• DNS and internet

    From Steve@110:300/1.1 to All on Sun Nov 15 14:54:23 2009
    Hi guys,

    You can maybe help me.

    I have a domain name ( foo.com ) and my domain provider doesn't allow me
    to get some sub domains...

    I decided to have my own DNS server
    Internally, the server is seems to work fine ( basic configuration made
    with Webmin )

    Now, how can have my sub-domains available over internet ?
    Unfortunately, I have absolutely no idea.

    - Should I change the DNS of my domain name provider ? ( pointing out MY
    DNS server ?

    - is there something else to do ?

    Thanks and indvance

    --- MBSE BBS v0.95.5 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Guest of ProXad - France (110:300/1.1@linuxnet)
  • From Jacob@1:0/0 to All on Sun Nov 15 16:26:28 2009
    I think you want to do is not so easy. The DNS resolution will point at an IP-address with (www.)foo.com this is usally a webserver.
    If you need a subdomain you can have a name-based subdomain on the same
    server (ip-address) or an ip-based on a different server (Different
    IP-Adress)
    To ensure that your subdomain can be reached, you need an ip-address with
    can be reached 24/365. If you have one you can make an entrance in your DNS-Server like:
    www.foo.com. IN A IP1 ;Original Domain
    sub.foo.com. IN A IP2 ;Subdomain
    The second IP can be where you want, but it has to be present 24/365!!

    If you don't have an IP2, but only a dynamic one (xyz.dyndns.org), you could try it with an alias like
    sub.foo.com. IN cname xyz.dyndns.org ;canonial address for
    subdomain

    it should work, but I have no idea how stable it is. Important is of course
    to get this entrance in a running DNS-Server for your domain.

    HTH
    Jacob

    "Steve" <Steve@noreply.fr> schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:4b00080f$0$24768$426a74cc@news.free.fr...
    Hi guys,

    You can maybe help me.

    I have a domain name ( foo.com ) and my domain provider doesn't allow me
    to get some sub domains...

    I decided to have my own DNS server
    Internally, the server is seems to work fine ( basic configuration made
    with Webmin )

    Now, how can have my sub-domains available over internet ?
    Unfortunately, I have absolutely no idea.

    - Should I change the DNS of my domain name provider ? ( pointing out MY
    DNS server ?

    - is there something else to do ?

    Thanks and indvance



    --- MBSE BBS v0.95.5 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: The KofoBBS MBSE - telnet://fido1.kofobbs.net
  • From Moe Trin@1:0/0 to All on Sun Nov 15 22:30:30 2009
    On Sun, 15 Nov 2009, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.redhat, in article <4b001da5$0$3296$8e6e7893@newsreader.ewetel.de>, Jacob wrote:

    [Top-posting corrected]

    "Steve" <Steve@noreply.fr> schrieb

    I have a domain name ( foo.com ) and my domain provider doesn't
    allow me to get some sub domains...

    I think what you mean is that the DNS provider won't set up sub-domains
    for your domain. You could change providers, but the extra service will probably cost more.

    I decided to have my own DNS server

    The DNS-HOWTO is rather old, but will get you started. For additional
    help with sub-domains (a.k.a. child domains), you probably want to be
    reading the 'cricket book' (DNS and BIND) from O'Reilly and Assoc.

    DNS and BIND, Fifth Edition May 2006 $49.99 ISBN: 978-0-596-10057-5
    or 0-596-10057-4, 648 pages

    Internally, the server is seems to work fine ( basic configuration
    made with Webmin )

    If it works, I guess it's OK, but I have no confidence in Webmin.

    Now, how can have my sub-domains available over internet ?
    Unfortunately, I have absolutely no idea.

    - Should I change the DNS of my domain name provider ? ( pointing
    out MY DNS server ?

    yes, and the slave or secondary. You probably would get better help
    on the Usenet newsgroup 'comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains'.

    I think you want to do is not so easy. The DNS resolution will point
    at an IP-address with (www.)foo.com this is usally a webserver.

    If all you have is a single IP address, this is probably true, but
    hardly the way larger domains - those normally associated with
    sub-domains - are operated.

    If you need a subdomain you can have a name-based subdomain on the
    same server (ip-address) or an ip-based on a different server
    (Different IP-Adress)

    This doesn't make sense even when discussing how the name server is
    configured, much less how the sub-domain is set up.

    To ensure that your subdomain can be reached, you need an ip-address
    with can be reached 24/365. If you have one you can make an entrance
    in your DNS-Server like:
    www.foo.com. IN A IP1 ;Original Domain
    sub.foo.com. IN A IP2 ;Subdomain

    Except that isn't a subdomain - it's merely a different _host_ in the
    parent domain. What you put in your zone files isn't going to do
    anything until your registrar has published the IP of the two or
    more name servers authoritative for your domain.

    If you don't have an IP2, but only a dynamic one (xyz.dyndns.org),

    you shouldn't be trying to pretend to have sub-domains.

    you could try it with an alias like
    sub.foo.com. IN cname xyz.dyndns.org ;canonial address for
    subdomain

    it should work, but I have no idea how stable it is.

    Your registrar should reject the concept of the same IP address for
    both name servers. You do realize that your domain registrar wants
    the IP addresses, not the names - how do you expect the world to be
    able to find the name servers if all they have is names, and no one
    to translate the name or refer to a name server that can do so.
    The reason for the IANA requirement of two OR MORE name servers is
    redundancy, allowing the names to be resolved when a host, OR THE
    LINK TO IT is down temporarily.

    Old guy

    --- MBSE BBS v0.95.5 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: The KofoBBS MBSE - telnet://fido1.kofobbs.net
  • From Steve@110:300/1.1 to All on Tue Nov 17 08:27:19 2009
    On Sun, 15 Nov 2009 15:30:30 -0600, Moe Trin wrote:

    On Sun, 15 Nov 2009, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.redhat, in
    article <4b001da5$0$3296$8e6e7893@newsreader.ewetel.de>, Jacob wrote:

    [Top-posting corrected]

    "Steve" <Steve@noreply.fr> schrieb

    I have a domain name ( foo.com ) and my domain provider doesn't allow
    me to get some sub domains...

    I think what you mean is that the DNS provider won't set up sub-domains
    for your domain. You could change providers, but the extra service will probably cost more.

    I decided to have my own DNS server

    The DNS-HOWTO is rather old, but will get you started. For additional
    help with sub-domains (a.k.a. child domains), you probably want to be
    reading the 'cricket book' (DNS and BIND) from O'Reilly and Assoc.

    DNS and BIND, Fifth Edition May 2006 $49.99 ISBN: 978-0-596-10057-5
    or 0-596-10057-4, 648 pages

    Internally, the server is seems to work fine ( basic configuration
    made with Webmin )

    If it works, I guess it's OK, but I have no confidence in Webmin.

    Now, how can have my sub-domains available over internet ?
    Unfortunately, I have absolutely no idea.

    - Should I change the DNS of my domain name provider ? ( pointing out
    MY DNS server ?

    yes, and the slave or secondary. You probably would get better help on
    the Usenet newsgroup 'comp.protocols.tcp-ip.domains'.

    I think you want to do is not so easy. The DNS resolution will point at
    an IP-address with (www.)foo.com this is usally a webserver.

    If all you have is a single IP address, this is probably true, but
    hardly the way larger domains - those normally associated with
    sub-domains - are operated.

    If you need a subdomain you can have a name-based subdomain on the same >>server (ip-address) or an ip-based on a different server (Different >>IP-Adress)

    This doesn't make sense even when discussing how the name server is configured, much less how the sub-domain is set up.

    To ensure that your subdomain can be reached, you need an ip-address
    with can be reached 24/365. If you have one you can make an entrance in >>your DNS-Server like:
    www.foo.com. IN A IP1 ;Original Domain sub.foo.com. IN
    A IP2 ;Subdomain

    Except that isn't a subdomain - it's merely a different _host_ in the
    parent domain. What you put in your zone files isn't going to do
    anything until your registrar has published the IP of the two or more
    name servers authoritative for your domain.

    If you don't have an IP2, but only a dynamic one (xyz.dyndns.org),

    you shouldn't be trying to pretend to have sub-domains.

    you could try it with an alias like
    sub.foo.com. IN cname xyz.dyndns.org ;canonial address for >>subdomain

    it should work, but I have no idea how stable it is.

    Your registrar should reject the concept of the same IP address for both
    name servers. You do realize that your domain registrar wants the IP addresses, not the names - how do you expect the world to be able to
    find the name servers if all they have is names, and no one to translate
    the name or refer to a name server that can do so. The reason for the
    IANA requirement of two OR MORE name servers is redundancy, allowing the names to be resolved when a host, OR THE LINK TO IT is down temporarily.

    Old guy



    I Moe,

    Thank you for your reply.

    I have a fix IP Address and up to know, I had enough with 5 subdomain
    that my NIC provider gave me.
    Unfortunately, I need to buy another domain (.fr)that my current provider doesn't offer -> I changed for another one and this one, doesn't allow me
    to do anything. ( in this case, I need to defined 2 differents address
    for the web and FTP server. If I want to do this, the provider is
    offering me a package much more expensive... that I don't need.

    At the moment, I am at test phase....
    I follow ( with webmin ) this procedure : http://www.scribd.com/doc/17731521/Using-Webmin-and-Bind9-to-Setup-DNS- Server-on-Linux-v13

    The result is not so bad... not everything is working fine... at the
    moment, but I made a good progress :-)

    Effectively, my problem is the second DNS ( the slave), which is not
    defined yet. So if I have a crash..... I will see that later on.

    Thanks

    Steve


    --- MBSE BBS v0.95.5 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: Guest of ProXad - France (110:300/1.1@linuxnet)
  • From Moe Trin@1:0/0 to All on Tue Nov 17 20:49:05 2009
    On 17 Nov 2009, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.redhat, in article <4b025057$0$18580$426a34cc@news.free.fr>, Steve wrote:

    Moe Trin wrote:

    The DNS-HOWTO is rather old, but will get you started. For additional
    help with sub-domains (a.k.a. child domains), you probably want to be
    reading the 'cricket book' (DNS and BIND) from O'Reilly and Assoc.

    DNS and BIND, Fifth Edition May 2006 $49.99 ISBN: 978-0-596-10057-5
    or 0-596-10057-4, 648 pages

    I have a fix IP Address and up to know, I had enough with 5 subdomain
    that my NIC provider gave me.
    Unfortunately, I need to buy another domain (.fr)that my current
    provider doesn't offer -> I changed for another one and this one,
    doesn't allow me to do anything. ( in this case, I need to defined 2 >differents address for the web and FTP server. If I want to do this,
    the provider is offering me a package much more expensive... that I
    don't need.

    Are we talking about the same thing? A sub-domain is a domain within
    the parent - such as

    county.TLD parent domain
    host.county.TLD host within parent domain
    host2.county.TLD another host within parent domain
    city.county.TLD child domain
    host.city.county.TLD host within child domain
    host2.city.county.TLD another host within child domain
    street.city.country.TLD child domain within child domain
    number.street.city.country.TLD host within that (sub-)sub-domain

    Just as "country.TLD" could be a CNAME for a host in the parent
    domain, you could also have "city.county.TLD" as a host name, but it
    would have to be a CNAME within the child, and this can get rather
    complicated to set up safely.

    Your description here sounds more as if you have two (or more) domains
    on the same physical host - which is a completely different problem.
    That's just a number of extra zonefiles listed in /etc/named.conf
    (although the PTR records can be ``interesting'').

    Effectively, my problem is the second DNS ( the slave), which is not
    defined yet. So if I have a crash..... I will see that later on.

    When we first set up DNS in the 1980s, we had master and slave
    located in the same room, on the same DMZ subnet, connected to the
    world by the same router... which really wasn't as big a problem
    as all of our network was reachable through a single T-1 only. If
    it went down, you couldn't reach our DNS, but you also could not
    reach any of our hosts, so it didn't matter that much (except for
    inbound mail which still worked if the sender knew the MX addresses,
    but not if they had to look those up first). By about 1988, we
    changed things such that we had connections to the world through
    several providers around the world, and had an internal set of links
    to connect everything. This allowed us to put the master in one
    facility, and the (three) slaves in three other facilities and each
    had a "different" connection to the world. Each facility was also a
    separate sub-domain (location.company.TLD), and each had their own
    master/slave DNS servers (hostname.location.company.TLD) that are
    authoritative for "their" sub-domain. Admining the individual
    sub-domains and the company domain isn't that difficult, but I
    certainly would not want to try to set it up without help and a lot
    of reading of the 'cricket book'. ;-)

    Old guy

    --- MBSE BBS v0.95.5 (GNU/Linux-x86_64)
    * Origin: The KofoBBS MBSE - telnet://fido1.kofobbs.net