• Outside IP Connection

    From worthingtonclinton@gmail.com@1:0/0 to All on Thu Feb 20 02:29:05 2014
    What are some ways I could have someone
    connect to my server through an internet
    browser outside of my local network?

    Example: http://72.22.14.20/ ???

    When I try the address above, the computer
    attempting to access my server through
    it's internet browser is thrown a 'cannot
    connect' error.

    My routers admin panel also does not
    allow me to port forward anything except a
    local IP.


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  • From Joe Beanfish@110:110/2002 to All on Thu Feb 20 14:26:20 2014
    On Wed, 19 Feb 2014 18:29:05 -0800, worthingtonclinton wrote:

    What are some ways I could have someone connect to my server through an internet browser outside of my local network?

    Example: http://72.22.14.20/ ???

    When I try the address above, the computer attempting to access my
    server through it's internet browser is thrown a 'cannot connect' error.

    My routers admin panel also does not allow me to port forward anything
    except a local IP.

    Seems unlikely and useless. What brand and model of router? Maybe someone
    here can tell you how to configure it.

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    * Origin: A noiseless patient Spider (110:110/2002@linuxnet)
  • From Andrew Gideon@110:110/2002 to All on Sat Feb 22 04:02:44 2014
    On Wed, 19 Feb 2014 18:29:05 -0800, worthingtonclinton wrote:

    My routers admin panel also does not allow me to port forward anything
    except a local IP.

    Perhaps the local IP is the IP which is the destination of the
    forwarding. If this router is a simple SOHO device, it may only support
    a single IP on the public Internet side, and that IP would necessarily be
    the IP to which some outsider would connect.

    In other words, your router is forwarding from sourceIP to destinationIP
    where sourceIP is the public Internet-facing IP of your router and is therefore not configuration where one configures the IP forwarding. Only
    the destinationIP - which is one of many possible IPs on the LAN side -
    is configurable where one configures IP forwarding.

    Of course, this is just a guess given that I know zero about what router you're using.

    - Andrew

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  • From Pascal Hambourg@110:110/2002 to All on Sat Feb 22 09:57:34 2014
    Reply-To: pascal.news@plouf.fr.eu.org

    Andrew Gideon a ‚crit :

    In other words, your router is forwarding from sourceIP to destinationIP where sourceIP is the public Internet-facing IP of your router

    In other words, it is the original *destination* address, and calling it
    "sourceIP" is misleading.

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    * Origin: Plouf ! (110:110/2002@linuxnet)
  • From Andrew Gideon@110:110/2002 to All on Sat Mar 1 20:19:05 2014
    On Sat, 22 Feb 2014 10:57:34 +0100, Pascal Hambourg wrote:

    In other words, your router is forwarding from sourceIP to
    destinationIP where sourceIP is the public Internet-facing IP of your
    router

    In other words, it is the original *destination* address, and calling it
    "sourceIP" is misleading.

    It is the destination IP of a connection being forwarded, but it is the
    source IP of the forwarding. I agree, though, that there are multiple contexts which can make this confusing. That's why I tried to explain in
    some detail.

    And, of course, all this remains merely a guess as to how the router
    might be working.

    - Andrew

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