• FiberOptic semi-follow-up

    From Barry Martin@454:1/1 to Nancy Backus on Thu Jun 18 15:21:00 2020

    Hi Nancy!

    Sort of a follow-up to something I think I mentioned to you. And
    sometimes typing things out gets my brina working. I had fiber-optic
    Internet service installed last Monday morning - the install went fine
    but a problem with the main transmission lines on the telephone poles:
    I'm getting only a reading of '40' and should be 90 or above. Fix
    requires a different kind of tech.

    There was something about the LEDs on the interface box which didn't
    make sense to me: the LED for "Data" was off. According to a manual I
    found on-line:

    DATA: Under normal conditions, this light will be blinking
    green/yellow! The blinking symbolizes data flowing through the ONT.

    (Not sure why they put an exclamation point in there.) OK, so one way
    to read is if no data then no blinkie. OTOH usually when an Ethernet
    cable is plugged in usually the port LEDs turn on, so solid.

    Brought the laptop downstairs; WiFi signal works (as expected).
    Disconnect the Ethernet cable from the fiber-optic box, plug into the
    laptop. ...Still on wireless, no port LEDs. (I'll give myself an
    exclamation point here! <g>) Check the other end of the Ethernet cable
    at the Hub -- unplugged; all 8 ports used so I had unplugged on never
    plugged this spare line in. Right now have an 'off' line (device on the
    other end shut off or disconnected) so using that line -- need to get a
    bigger hub.

    Next step is to check if my fix gave me high-speed Internet!


    Barry_Martin_3@
    @Q.COM



    ... As Noah said after dinner, "Those unicorn steaks were excellent!"
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.47
    wcECHO 4.2 ILink: The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA

    --- QScan/PCB v1.20a / 01-0462
    * Origin: ILink: CFBBS | cfbbs.no-ip.com | 856-933-7096 (454:1/1)
  • From Barry Martin@454:1/1 to Nancy Backus on Thu Jun 18 15:27:00 2020


    Hi Nancy!

    This may be a repeat of a message I just uploaded a minute ago -- I
    can't tell if the upload took or not. If the next paragraph looks
    familiar it did, if not it didn't!


    Sort of a follow-up to something I think I mentioned to you. And
    sometimes typing things out gets my brina working. I had fiber-optic
    Internet service installed last Monday morning - the install went fine
    but a problem with the main transmission lines on the telephone poles:
    I'm getting only a reading of '40' and should be 90 or above. Fix
    requires a different kind of tech.

    There was something about the LEDs on the interface box which didn't
    make sense to me: the LED for "Data" was off. According to a manual I
    found on-line:

    DATA: Under normal conditions, this light will be blinking
    green/yellow! The blinking symbolizes data flowing through the ONT.

    (Not sure why they put an exclamation point in there.) OK, so one way
    to read is if no data then no blinkie. OTOH usually when an Ethernet
    cable is plugged in usually the port LEDs turn on, so solid.

    Brought the laptop downstairs; WiFi signal works (as expected).
    Disconnect the Ethernet cable from the fiber-optic box, plug into the
    laptop. ...Still on wireless, no port LEDs. (I'll give myself an
    exclamation point here! <g>) Check the other end of the Ethernet cable
    at the Hub -- unplugged; all 8 ports used so I had unplugged on never
    plugged this spare line in. Right now have an 'off' line (device on the
    other end shut off or disconnected) so using that line -- need to get a
    bigger hub.

    Next step is to check if my fix gave me high-speed Internet!


    Barry_Martin_3@
    @Q.COM



    ... As Noah said after dinner, "Those unicorn steaks were excellent!"
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.47
    wcECHO 4.2 ILink: The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA

    --- QScan/PCB v1.20a / 01-0462
    * Origin: ILink: CFBBS | cfbbs.no-ip.com | 856-933-7096 (454:1/1)
  • From Daryl Stout@454:1/33 to Barry Martin on Sat Jun 20 10:55:00 2020
    Barry,

    Next step is to check if my fix gave me high-speed Internet!

    300 baud is a lot better than 110. <g,d,r>

    Daryl

    ... Gone crazy, be back later, please leave message.
    === MultiMail/Win32 v0.50
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (454:1/33)
  • From Barry Martin@454:1/1 to Daryl Stout on Mon Jun 22 09:41:00 2020

    Might be a duplicate: I didn't see it upload.


    Hi Daryl!

    Next step is to check if my fix gave me high-speed Internet!
    300 baud is a lot better than 110. <g,d,r>

    Response A: Though one would think almost three times better.

    Response B: Both are better than your bod!



    Barry_Martin_3@
    @Q.COM



    ... "He-hehe-hehe, 2400 baud!" -- V.bis and Baudhead.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.47
    wcECHO 4.2 ILink: The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA

    --- QScan/PCB v1.20a / 01-0462
    * Origin: ILink: CFBBS | cfbbs.no-ip.com | 856-933-7096 (454:1/1)
  • From Daryl Stout@454:1/33 to Barry Martin on Wed Jun 24 12:50:00 2020
    Barry,

    Might be a duplicate: I didn't see it upload.

    OK, we'll send a reply 4 times, to strengthen our quads. <G>

    ... "He-hehe-hehe, 2400 baud!" -- V.bis and Baudhead.

    I remember when we had 9600 and 14.4, and we thought we were
    "smokin'". <G> And, only Sysops can get "enjoyment" over hearing
    the sound effect of a dial-up modem connecting. <G>

    Daryl

    ... He who laughs last thinks slowest.
    === MultiMail/Win32 v0.50
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (454:1/33)
  • From Barry Martin@454:1/1 to Daryl Stout on Thu Jun 25 19:29:00 2020

    Hi Daryl!

    Might be a duplicate: I didn't see it upload.
    OK, we'll send a reply 4 times, to strengthen our quads. <G>

    That's one way to do those reps!


    ... "He-hehe-hehe, 2400 baud!" -- V.bis and Baudhead.
    I remember when we had 9600 and 14.4, and we thought we were
    "smokin'". <G> And, only Sysops can get "enjoyment" over hearing
    the sound effect of a dial-up modem connecting. <G>

    Screeeeech, squawksch! Boing! Boing!



    Barry_Martin_3@
    @Q.COM



    ...  Oh, give me a phone, with a modem on loan... 
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.47
    wcECHO 4.2 ILink: The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA

    --- QScan/PCB v1.20a / 01-0462
    * Origin: ILink: CFBBS | cfbbs.no-ip.com | 856-933-7096 (454:1/1)
  • From Nancy Backus@454:1/452 to Barry Martin on Fri Jun 26 17:31:46 2020
    Quoting Barry Martin to Nancy Backus on 18-Jun-2020 15:27 <=-

    This may be a repeat of a message I just uploaded a minute ago -- I
    can't tell if the upload took or not. If the next paragraph looks familiar it did, if not it didn't!

    It was a repeat, so I'm answering this instead of the first... not that
    there's much for me to say... ;)

    Sort of a follow-up to something I think I mentioned to you. And sometimes typing things out gets my brina working. I had fiber-optic
    ^^^^^
    (repeat, even to the typo of brain above....[g])

    Internet service installed last Monday morning - the install went fine
    but a problem with the main transmission lines on the telephone poles:
    I'm getting only a reading of '40' and should be 90 or above. Fix requires a different kind of tech.
    There was something about the LEDs on the interface box which didn't
    make sense to me: the LED for "Data" was off. According to a manual I found on-line:
    DATA: Under normal conditions, this light will be blinking
    green/yellow! The blinking symbolizes data flowing through the ONT.
    (Not sure why they put an exclamation point in there.) OK, so one way
    to read is if no data then no blinkie. OTOH usually when an Ethernet cable is plugged in usually the port LEDs turn on, so solid.

    Kinda makes sense...

    Brought the laptop downstairs; WiFi signal works (as expected).
    Disconnect the Ethernet cable from the fiber-optic box, plug into the laptop. ...Still on wireless, no port LEDs. (I'll give myself an exclamation point here! <g>) Check the other end of the Ethernet
    cable at the Hub -- unplugged; all 8 ports used so I had unplugged or never plugged this spare line in. Right now have an 'off' line (device
    on the other end shut off or disconnected) so using that line -- need
    to get a bigger hub.

    Well, that could explain some of the problem... if not the 40 vs 90...

    Next step is to check if my fix gave me high-speed Internet!

    And had it...?

    ttyl neb

    ... A riddle, wrapped in an enigma, folded into a soft taco shell.

    --- EzyBlueWave V3.00 01FB001F
    * Origin: Tiny's BBS - http://www.tinysbbs.com (454:1/452)
  • From Barry Martin@454:1/1 to Nancy Backus on Sat Jun 27 09:29:00 2020

    Hi Nancy!


    This may be a repeat of a message I just uploaded a minute ago -- I
    can't tell if the upload took or not. If the next paragraph looks familiar it did, if not it didn't!
    It was a repeat, so I'm answering this instead of the first...
    not that there's much for me to say... ;)

    So they did get inserted -- better safe than sorry, especially the long
    way I have to do to recreate. Probably a better way, just need so infrequently....


    Sort of a follow-up to something I think I mentioned to you. And sometimes typing things out gets my brina working. I had fiber-optic
    ^^^^^
    (repeat, even to the typo of brain above....[g])

    Too much Italian salt? ==> brine-a!


    Internet service installed last Monday morning - the install went fine
    but a problem with the main transmission lines on the telephone poles:
    I'm getting only a reading of '40' and should be 90 or above. Fix requires a different kind of tech.
    There was something about the LEDs on the interface box which didn't
    make sense to me: the LED for "Data" was off. According to a manual I found on-line:
    DATA: Under normal conditions, this light will be blinking
    green/yellow! The blinking symbolizes data flowing through the ONT.
    (Not sure why they put an exclamation point in there.) OK, so one way
    to read is if no data then no blinkie. OTOH usually when an Ethernet cable is plugged in usually the port LEDs turn on, so solid.
    Kinda makes sense...

    And I had sort of found out from the second technician (the one who only
    had to install the router but his work ticket said a full install) they
    only have five hours of training. Sort of makes sense: for that
    particular job "all" they do is string the fiber optic drop from the
    pole to the house, plug the fiber optic drop in to the box at the pole
    and the box on the side of the house, run another cable inside, connect
    that to another box inside... Maybe the firts tech had to go to the
    rest room at this point and missed the part about the router, or with a
    single computer it works but multiple like I have it needs that router.

    Not putting them down but there's a lot of details one learns even as a hobbyist for over fifty years as opposed to a five hour classroom
    session. ...Even if a fifty hour class. Basically the three of us
    needed each other and worked together to get it done.



    Brought the laptop downstairs; WiFi signal works (as expected).
    Disconnect the Ethernet cable from the fiber-optic box, plug into the laptop. ...Still on wireless, no port LEDs. (I'll give myself an exclamation point here! <g>) Check the other end of the Ethernet
    cable at the Hub -- unplugged; all 8 ports used so I had unplugged or never plugged this spare line in. Right now have an 'off' line (device
    on the other end shut off or disconnected) so using that line -- need
    to get a bigger hub.
    Well, that could explain some of the problem... if not the 40 vs
    90...

    It would have been funny if I had done it the Rube Goldberg way: I think there's a wireless output from the router: have that picked up by the
    WiFi up here and distribute it back to the wired portion!


    Next step is to check if my fix gave me high-speed Internet!
    And had it...?

    Yup! Ky gave me a test site: have 200 Mbps symetrical service. The test
    showed 204 Mbps d/l and around 150 Mbps u/l. With symmetrical the
    latter should also be in the 200 range but not going to whine about
    that: I could have easily screwed up the test as one isn't supposed to
    be running other stuff while the test is being conducted. With DSL I
    could see when Pandora was updating the music as there was a slight
    slowdown with the test charting.


    ... A riddle, wrapped in an enigma, folded into a soft taco
    shell.

    That's one way to describe troubleshooting!



    Barry_Martin_3@
    @Q.COM



    ... The human heart creates enough pressure to squirt blood 30 feet.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.47
    wcECHO 4.2 ILink: The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA

    --- QScan/PCB v1.20a / 01-0462
    * Origin: ILink: CFBBS | cfbbs.no-ip.com | 856-933-7096 (454:1/1)
  • From Nancy Backus@454:1/452 to Barry Martin on Thu Jul 9 00:35:16 2020
    Quoting Barry Martin to Nancy Backus on 27-Jun-2020 09:29 <=-

    Sort of a follow-up to something I think I mentioned to you. And
    sometimes typing things out gets my brina working. I had fiber-optic
    ^^^^^
    (repeat, even to the typo of brain above....[g])
    Too much Italian salt? ==> brine-a!

    Could be... ;) But yes, I know what you mean about typing things out
    can get the brain working... and I'm used to being used as a sounding
    board even for things I have no clue about.... :)

    Internet service installed last Monday morning - the install went fine
    but a problem with the main transmission lines on the telephone poles:
    I'm getting only a reading of '40' and should be 90 or above. Fix
    requires a different kind of tech.
    There was something about the LEDs on the interface box which didn't
    make sense to me: the LED for "Data" was off. According to a manual I
    found on-line:
    DATA: Under normal conditions, this light will be blinking
    green/yellow! The blinking symbolizes data flowing through the ONT.
    (Not sure why they put an exclamation point in there.) OK, so one way
    to read is if no data then no blinkie. OTOH usually when an Ethernet
    cable is plugged in usually the port LEDs turn on, so solid.
    Kinda makes sense...
    And I had sort of found out from the second technician (the one who
    only had to install the router but his work ticket said a full install) they only have five hours of training. Sort of makes sense: for that particular job "all" they do is string the fiber optic drop from the
    pole to the house, plug the fiber optic drop in to the box at the pole
    and the box on the side of the house, run another cable inside,
    connect that to another box inside... Maybe the first tech had to go
    to the rest room at this point and missed the part about the router, or with a single computer it works but multiple like I have it needs that router.

    And maybe there were a lot of picky specifics that were only in the
    written handouts, and not part of the actual lectures... or they were
    mostly videos, and the techs tended to zone out... ;)

    Not putting them down but there's a lot of details one learns even as
    a hobbyist for over fifty years as opposed to a five hour classroom session. ...Even if a fifty hour class. Basically the three of us
    needed each other and worked together to get it done.

    And as you say, your setup was probably not the standard one, with your multitude of computers, as opposed to just the one that many people
    have.... ;)

    Brought the laptop downstairs; WiFi signal works (as expected).
    Disconnect the Ethernet cable from the fiber-optic box, plug into the
    laptop. ...Still on wireless, no port LEDs. (I'll give myself an
    exclamation point here! <g>) Check the other end of the Ethernet
    cable at the Hub -- unplugged; all 8 ports used so I had unplugged or
    never plugged this spare line in. Right now have an 'off' line (device
    on the other end shut off or disconnected) so using that line -- need
    to get a bigger hub.
    Well, that could explain some of the problem... if not the 40 vs 90...
    It would have been funny if I had done it the Rube Goldberg way: I
    think there's a wireless output from the router: have that picked up by the WiFi up here and distribute it back to the wired portion!

    Yes, that could have been amusing.... :)

    Next step is to check if my fix gave me high-speed Internet!
    And had it...?
    Yup! Ky gave me a test site: have 200 Mbps symetrical service. The
    test showed 204 Mbps d/l and around 150 Mbps u/l. With symmetrical the latter should also be in the 200 range but not going to whine about
    that: I could have easily screwed up the test as one isn't supposed to
    be running other stuff while the test is being conducted. With DSL I could see when Pandora was updating the music as there was a slight slowdown with the test charting.

    Then I guess it's been worth it to upgrade to fiber... ;)

    ... A riddle, wrapped in an enigma, folded into a soft taco shell.
    That's one way to describe troubleshooting!

    Yup. I did think that appropriate... ;)

    ttyl neb

    ... "I've changed my mind." "Great! Does it work any better?"

    --- EzyBlueWave V3.00 01FB001F
    * Origin: Tiny's BBS - http://www.tinysbbs.com (454:1/452)
  • From Barry Martin@454:1/1 to Nancy Backus on Thu Jul 9 08:41:00 2020

    Hi Nancy!


    Sort of a follow-up to something I think I mentioned to you. And
    sometimes typing things out gets my brina working. I had fiber-optic
    (repeat, even to the typo of brain above....[g])
    Too much Italian salt? ==> brine-a!
    Could be... ;) But yes, I know what you mean about typing things
    out can get the brain working... and I'm used to being used as a
    sounding board even for things I have no clue about.... :)

    As I mentioned some time before, sometimes the act of me explaining
    (verbally or typing) the situation/prject forces me to think
    differently: I have to describe something the other person has little to
    no clue about. And even if they do know a little bit the explaining at
    their level requires a thinking at a different level to create the explanation. So actually a compliment to person being the soundingboard
    by the original person: the belief is soundingboard person can be
    brought up to speed on the subject quickly and provide input. ;)



    Internet service installed last Monday morning - the install went fine
    but a problem with the main transmission lines on the telephone poles:
    I'm getting only a reading of '40' and should be 90 or above. Fix
    requires a different kind of tech.
    There was something about the LEDs on the interface box which didn't
    make sense to me: the LED for "Data" was off. According to a manual I
    found on-line:
    DATA: Under normal conditions, this light will be blinking
    green/yellow! The blinking symbolizes data flowing through the ONT.
    (Not sure why they put an exclamation point in there.) OK, so one way
    to read is if no data then no blinkie. OTOH usually when an Ethernet
    cable is plugged in usually the port LEDs turn on, so solid.
    Kinda makes sense...
    And I had sort of found out from the second technician (the one who
    only had to install the router but his work ticket said a full install) they only have five hours of training. Sort of makes sense: for that particular job "all" they do is string the fiber optic drop from the
    pole to the house, plug the fiber optic drop in to the box at the pole
    and the box on the side of the house, run another cable inside,
    connect that to another box inside... Maybe the first tech had to go
    to the rest room at this point and missed the part about the router, or with a single computer it works but multiple like I have it needs that router.
    And maybe there were a lot of picky specifics that were only in
    the written handouts, and not part of the actual lectures... or
    they were mostly videos, and the techs tended to zone out... ;)

    Possible! Classroom troubleshooting scenarios are somewhat difficult to create, though mine with a disconnecting Ethernet line seems easy
    enough. I'm not coming up with an easy way to forget about an entire
    device (the Router). Oh well, it's running quite nicely now. :) And
    the bill was adjusted to start from the Friday it properly connected
    not the previous Monday of the installation.


    Not putting them down but there's a lot of details one learns even as
    a hobbyist for over fifty years as opposed to a five hour classroom session. ...Even if a fifty hour class. Basically the three of us
    needed each other and worked together to get it done.
    And as you say, your setup was probably not the standard one,
    with your multitude of computers, as opposed to just the one that
    many people have.... ;)

    I suppose, Was thinking a lot of people might not have a stuck-in-one-
    place computer but a lot of laptops, tablets. and other wireless
    devices. ...Which probably would have connected to the originally-
    installed gateway device! Thanks! You just explained why the first
    technician wouldn't have thought it odd not to install a Router!



    Next step is to check if my fix gave me high-speed Internet!
    And had it...?
    Yup! Ky gave me a test site: have 200 Mbps symetrical service. The
    test showed 204 Mbps d/l and around 150 Mbps u/l. With symmetrical the latter should also be in the 200 range but not going to whine about
    that: I could have easily screwed up the test as one isn't supposed to
    be running other stuff while the test is being conducted. With DSL I could see when Pandora was updating the music as there was a slight slowdown with the test charting.
    Then I guess it's been worth it to upgrade to fiber... ;)

    In the interim I had uploaded a 'ton' of pictures -- with DSL would have
    taken about 15-20 minutes; fiber optic took maybe two. (I should say
    the DSL service available to me was either 7 or 10 Mbps d/l and
    something like 870 Kbps u/l. Ther are faster DSL services but I can't
    get them.)



    BarryMartin3@
    @MyMetronet.NET

    (Humans know what
    to remove.)

    ... ClientSez: I have a cursing flasher.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.47
    wcECHO 4.2 ILink: The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA

    --- QScan/PCB v1.20a / 01-0462
    * Origin: ILink: CFBBS | cfbbs.no-ip.com | 856-933-7096 (454:1/1)
  • From Nancy Backus@454:1/452 to Barry Martin on Fri Jul 31 17:11:54 2020
    Quoting Barry Martin to Nancy Backus on 09-Jul-2020 08:41 <=-

    But yes, I know what you mean about typing things out can get the
    brain working... and I'm used to being used as a sounding board even
    for things I have no clue about.... :)
    As I mentioned some time before, sometimes the act of me explaining (verbally or typing) the situation/prject forces me to think
    differently: I have to describe something the other person has little
    to no clue about. And even if they do know a little bit the explaining
    at their level requires a thinking at a different level to create the explanation. So actually a compliment to person being the
    soundingboard by the original person: the belief is soundingboard
    person can be brought up to speed on the subject quickly and provide input. ;)

    Or even if there isn't any actual input, the rethinking on your part
    might give some input anyway... ;)

    And I had sort of found out from the second technician (the one who
    only had to install the router but his work ticket said a full install)
    they only have five hours of training. Sort of makes sense: for that
    particular job "all" they do is string the fiber optic drop from the
    pole to the house, plug the fiber optic drop in to the box at the pole
    and the box on the side of the house, run another cable inside,
    connect that to another box inside... Maybe the first tech had to go
    to the rest room at this point and missed the part about the router, or
    with a single computer it works but multiple like I have it needs that
    router.
    And maybe there were a lot of picky specifics that were only in the
    written handouts, and not part of the actual lectures... or they were
    mostly videos, and the techs tended to zone out... ;)
    Possible! Classroom troubleshooting scenarios are somewhat difficult
    to create, though mine with a disconnecting Ethernet line seems easy enough. I'm not coming up with an easy way to forget about an entire device (the Router). Oh well, it's running quite nicely now. :) And
    the bill was adjusted to start from the Friday it properly connected
    not the previous Monday of the installation.

    Good that it is properly running now... and that they gave you a credit
    for the time it wasn't quite... :)

    Not putting them down but there's a lot of details one learns even as
    a hobbyist for over fifty years as opposed to a five hour classroom
    session. ...Even if a fifty hour class. Basically the three of us
    needed each other and worked together to get it done.
    And as you say, your setup was probably not the standard one, with
    your multitude of computers, as opposed to just the one that many
    people have.... ;)
    I suppose, Was thinking a lot of people might not have a stuck-in-one-place computer but a lot of laptops, tablets. and other wireless devices. ...Which probably would have connected to the originally-installed gateway device! Thanks! You just explained why
    the first technician wouldn't have thought it odd not to install a
    Router!

    Just a slightly different perspective... ;)

    Next step is to check if my fix gave me high-speed Internet!
    And had it...?
    Yup! Ky gave me a test site: have 200 Mbps symetrical service. The
    test showed 204 Mbps d/l and around 150 Mbps u/l. With symmetrical the
    latter should also be in the 200 range but not going to whine about
    that: I could have easily screwed up the test as one isn't supposed to
    be running other stuff while the test is being conducted. With DSL I
    could see when Pandora was updating the music as there was a slight
    slowdown with the test charting.
    Then I guess it's been worth it to upgrade to fiber... ;)
    In the interim I had uploaded a 'ton' of pictures -- with DSL would
    have taken about 15-20 minutes; fiber optic took maybe two. (I should
    say the DSL service available to me was either 7 or 10 Mbps d/l and something like 870 Kbps u/l. Ther are faster DSL services but I can't
    get them.)

    Definitely worth it for you then.... ;)

    ttyl neb

    ... *IT IS* documented, look under "For Internal Use Only."

    --- EzyBlueWave V3.00 01FB001F
    * Origin: Tiny's BBS - http://www.tinysbbs.com (454:1/452)
  • From Barry Martin@454:1/1 to Nancy Backus on Sat Aug 1 10:11:00 2020

    Hi Nancy!

    But yes, I know what you mean about typing things out can get the
    brain working... and I'm used to being used as a sounding board even
    for things I have no clue about.... :)
    As I mentioned some time before, sometimes the act of me explaining (verbally or typing) the situation/project forces me to think
    differently: I have to describe something the other person has little
    to no clue about. And even if they do know a little bit the explaining
    at their level requires a thinking at a different level to create the explanation. So actually a compliment to person being the
    soundingboard by the original person: the belief is soundingboard
    person can be brought up to speed on the subject quickly and provide input. ;)
    Or even if there isn't any actual input, the rethinking on your
    part might give some input anyway... ;)

    If the output of the soundboard person is "huh?" then there is a
    rethinking on my part of them! <g> But yes, doing something to alter
    the thinking loop is sometimes necessary, especially when
    troubleshooting. Also needed when sending stuff out into the real world
    -- part is called 'beta testing'!


    And I had sort of found out from the second technician (the one who
    only had to install the router but his work ticket said a full install)
    they only have five hours of training. Sort of makes sense: for that
    particular job "all" they do is string the fiber optic drop from the
    pole to the house, plug the fiber optic drop in to the box at the pole
    and the box on the side of the house, run another cable inside,
    connect that to another box inside... Maybe the first tech had to go
    to the rest room at this point and missed the part about the router, or
    with a single computer it works but multiple like I have it needs that
    router.
    And maybe there were a lot of picky specifics that were only in the
    written handouts, and not part of the actual lectures... or they were
    mostly videos, and the techs tended to zone out... ;)
    Possible! Classroom troubleshooting scenarios are somewhat difficult
    to create, though mine with a disconnecting Ethernet line seems easy enough. I'm not coming up with an easy way to forget about an entire device (the Router). Oh well, it's running quite nicely now. :) And
    the bill was adjusted to start from the Friday it properly connected
    not the previous Monday of the installation.
    Good that it is properly running now... and that they gave you a
    credit for the time it wasn't quite... :)

    Yes - no problems. Hasn't really had any 'acid tests' like power
    outages and stormy weather. Well, did have those torrential downpours
    but I wasn't at the computer to see things working.




    Next step is to check if my fix gave me high-speed Internet!
    And had it...?
    Yup! Ky gave me a test site: have 200 Mbps symetrical service. The
    test showed 204 Mbps d/l and around 150 Mbps u/l. With symmetrical the
    latter should also be in the 200 range but not going to whine about
    that: I could have easily screwed up the test as one isn't supposed to
    be running other stuff while the test is being conducted. With DSL I
    could see when Pandora was updating the music as there was a slight
    slowdown with the test charting.
    Then I guess it's been worth it to upgrade to fiber... ;)
    In the interim I had uploaded a 'ton' of pictures -- with DSL would
    have taken about 15-20 minutes; fiber optic took maybe two. (I should
    say the DSL service available to me was either 7 or 10 Mbps d/l and something like 870 Kbps u/l. There are faster DSL services but I can't get them.)
    Definitely worth it for you then.... ;)

    Yes, and I think right now because of the pricing special the fiber
    optic is costing me about the same as DSL was. I'm not sure: phone bill
    is had to figure out: all those little taxes and regulatory fees and
    toss a credit in here and there just for the feel good factor. Based on
    what the customer service person said my future telephone bills would be
    I'll only be paying about ten dollars more per month more. (Old phone
    with DSL + $10 = New Phone + fiber optic.)


    BarryMartin3@
    @MyMetronet.NET

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