• Solar TV Battery Test II

    From Barry Martin@454:1/1 to Nancy Backus on Sun Apr 5 10:04:00 2020

    Hi Nancy!

    But you can keep it in your pocket if you aren't swayed by their
    rhetoric... ;)
    And I have! Also have been swayed but on checking out reviews is
    barely useful.
    I tend to be mostly impervious to advertising.... unless I'm already
    considering something, and have been already checking it out, their
    rhetoric doesn't get to me... :)
    But-but-but: it's New _and_ Improved!! <g>
    And.........??? <G>
    And?! But it's 'New' and 'Improved'!!' What more could one want?!! <g>
    Working, and doing what I need it to do....? <G> Oh, and not
    costing excessively, or actually not being any different from the
    previous item.... ;)

    Working better than before is always a nice thing! Even better is when
    I notice the proclaimed improvement and it actually does something. "Now
    with more bubbles!" is fine for a bubble bath but not necessarily for a
    car wash soap!


    I'll tend to glance at the electronics (more computer) advertising,
    sort of to see what's out there, sort of for planning future computer
    builds/expansions.
    That somewhat makes sense... not so much planning on buying as
    keeping abreast on what might be happening...
    The 'buck/boost' device idea derived from a 'technical advertisement'. Will admit it took a few postings of the ad to finally catch.
    It finally dawned on you what good it might do YOU... ;)

    Yup! I had been thinking Zener diode which would 'buck' the high input voltage but would dp nothing for the low input. For than I had a
    digital voltmeter: visually monitoring. Both of those have a bit of a
    flaw, which is probably why I didn't persue.


    As for the insurance ads - some are entertaining! More what perks up
    my ears is the "you could save up to", which did get me to consider
    and eventually change my insurance -- ten years ago?! Right now
    still at a reasonable rate, no dissatisfaction, so no need to
    consider switching. Will probably do a review again in a year or two.
    I look at the print ads sometimes, but not been inclined to check
    anything out yet.... I've noticed that the company we're with tends
    to have the least savings by switching, which tends to reinforce my
    idea that we're probably best off where we are... :)
    That would seem logical. Not a bad idea to have a review every five
    or ten years: things change. You might have purchased a ...ummm... (y'know being relatively easily satisfied has drawbacks when trying to come up with examples!).... Aw, jacuzzi! Maybe you thought was covered under homeowners but isn't, or barely is and for a few dollars can get
    a decent rider.
    Yeah, right.... not too many things we'd even consider as a
    possible thing.... Besides, our agent does have us come in every
    so often to check our coverage and make sure that we have what we
    need.... :)

    Our agent is more of a slackard on that specific but any time there is a question she's available and will fit us in.



    As for clothing, food, ...furniture.... Don't really need anything.
    Well, food on a regular basis but satisfied with Hy-Vee; do check
    their ads for sale items.
    Likewise... :) Wegmans doesn't have food ads anymore, as such... but
    I do keep an eye out in the store at things we buy regularly to see if
    they go on sale, and if so, if one should get it a little early to
    take advantage of the sale.... and I regularly check out the digital
    coupons for anything I might be getting.... :)
    Hy-Vee announced last week they were temporarily discontinuing their
    print ad because they couldn't guarantee sufficient stock due to
    COVID-19 issues. Did have the on-line ad, at least for this week (effective date March 25), though IMO wasn't much in it; I probably
    would have skipped if it wasn't for me being across the street for the cards, etc., at Dollar General and needing a few things which rarely
    go on sale.
    Wegmans had discontinued theirs a couple of years ago... long
    before anything like this was happening.... We just do our weekly shopping... I have noticed, though, that some of the sales (noted
    from the shelf tags) have quietly ended early.... I guess there's
    no need to stimulate sales when one at the same time has to limit
    how much shoppers can buy at a time, with stocks diminishing too quickly.... ;0 There haven't been any new digital coupons
    either...

    I'm wondering if Hy-Vee (and other grocers and possibly retailers in
    general) will take this as an opportunity to cut back on their
    advertising? I'm sort of relucant to eliminate print ads as I think
    they serve as a reminder ("remember us!") but I don't think short-term
    sales are necessary. Actually I find them rather annoying: so if I go
    Friday instead of Thursday I could save, but Fridays are inconvenient. ...Suppose not much different than it's on sale this week but not next.

    As for the lack of digital coupons, Clorox and the like don't need to advertise much less give money off; DiGiorno probably would still like to
    tempt customers away from Tony's. And redeemed coupons add several
    cents to the store's bottom line.


    Will be interesting to see what next week's electronic ad offers.
    Indeed. :)

    I was telling someone last week's Hy-Vee digital ad had over 1,000 items
    while this week's had a little over 400. And their 99 orange juice
    (limit two) was sold out. (But I did get the last roll of Angel Soft
    toilet paper, plus I had a dollar off digital coupon!!)

    ... Windows without dos is only Winw.

    <LOL!!>


    Barry_Martin_3@
    @Q.COM



    ... A fake diamond is a shamrock.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.47
    wcECHO 4.2 ILink: The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA

    --- QScan/PCB v1.20a / 01-0462
    * Origin: ILink: CFBBS | cfbbs.no-ip.com | 856-933-7096 (454:1/1)
  • From Nancy Backus@454:1/452 to Barry Martin on Tue Apr 14 17:54:04 2020
    Quoting Barry Martin to Nancy Backus on 05-Apr-2020 10:04 <=-

    I tend to be mostly impervious to advertising.... unless I'm already
    considering something, and have been already checking it out, their
    rhetoric doesn't get to me... :)
    But-but-but: it's New _and_ Improved!! <g>
    And.........??? <G>
    And?! But it's 'New' and 'Improved'!!' What more could one want?!! <g>
    Working, and doing what I need it to do....? <G> Oh, and not costing
    excessively, or actually not being any different from the previous
    item.... ;)
    Working better than before is always a nice thing! Even better is
    when I notice the proclaimed improvement and it actually does
    something. "Now with more bubbles!" is fine for a bubble bath but not necessarily for a car wash soap!

    Exactly... it is possible for a product to actually be improved, in a
    way that is useful.... ;) But often it's only hype... <G>

    I'll tend to glance at the electronics (more computer) advertising,
    sort of to see what's out there, sort of for planning future computer
    builds/expansions.
    That somewhat makes sense... not so much planning on buying as
    keeping abreast on what might be happening...
    The 'buck/boost' device idea derived from a 'technical advertisement'.
    Will admit it took a few postings of the ad to finally catch.
    It finally dawned on you what good it might do YOU... ;)
    Yup! I had been thinking Zener diode which would 'buck' the high
    input voltage but would do nothing for the low input. For than I had a digital voltmeter: visually monitoring. Both of those have a bit of a flaw, which is probably why I didn't persue.

    Having something to handle both ends of the problem without your needing
    to intervene is indeed a useful thing... :)

    That would seem logical. Not a bad idea to have a review every five
    or ten years: things change. You might have purchased a ...ummm...
    (y'know being relatively easily satisfied has drawbacks when trying to
    come up with examples!).... Aw, jacuzzi! Maybe you thought was covered
    under homeowners but isn't, or barely is and for a few dollars can get
    a decent rider.
    Yeah, right.... not too many things we'd even consider as a possible
    thing.... Besides, our agent does have us come in every so often to
    check our coverage and make sure that we have what we need.... :)
    Our agent is more of a slackard on that specific but any time there is
    a question she's available and will fit us in.

    Ours is also good on the answering questions part, and helping with
    situations as they come up... :)

    Hy-Vee announced last week they were temporarily discontinuing their
    print ad because they couldn't guarantee sufficient stock due to
    COVID-19 issues. Did have the on-line ad, at least for this week
    (effective date March 25), though IMO wasn't much in it; I probably
    would have skipped if it wasn't for me being across the street for the
    cards, etc., at Dollar General and needing a few things which rarely
    go on sale.
    Wegmans had discontinued theirs a couple of years ago... long before
    anything like this was happening.... We just do our weekly shopping...
    I have noticed, though, that some of the sales (noted from the shelf
    tags) have quietly ended early.... I guess there's no need to
    stimulate sales when one at the same time has to limit how much
    shoppers can buy at a time, with stocks diminishing too quickly... ;0
    There haven't been any new digital coupons either...
    I'm wondering if Hy-Vee (and other grocers and possibly retailers in general) will take this as an opportunity to cut back on their advertising? I'm sort of reluctant to eliminate print ads as I think
    they serve as a reminder ("remember us!") but I don't think short-term sales are necessary. Actually I find them rather annoying: so if I go Friday instead of Thursday I could save, but Fridays are inconvenient. ...Suppose not much different than it's on sale this week but not next.

    Wegmans has very few short-term (even just a week long) sales anymore...
    they went to longer term price reductions on things, like a couple of
    months or so.... the idea being that one doesn't have to binge-buy on
    something when it finally goes on sale, but can stock up gradually over
    the course of weeks... ;) That's been the case for maybe even a decade
    now... :)

    As for the lack of digital coupons, Clorox and the like don't need to advertise much less give money off; DiGiorno probably would still like
    to tempt customers away from Tony's. And redeemed coupons add several cents to the store's bottom line.

    I was thinking more of the store's own digital coupons... I've not been
    getting the digital manufacturer's coupons... only the paper ones when
    they happen to show up for things I buy anyway... :)

    Will be interesting to see what next week's electronic ad offers.
    Indeed. :)
    I was telling someone last week's Hy-Vee digital ad had over 1,000
    items while this week's had a little over 400. And their 99 orange
    juice (limit two) was sold out. (But I did get the last roll of Angel Soft toilet paper, plus I had a dollar off digital coupon!!)

    Win some, lose some... ;)

    ttyl neb

    ... Multigrain cereals: boxes full of small cookies with oat bran added.

    --- EzyBlueWave V3.00 01FB001F
    * Origin: Tiny's BBS - http://www.tinysbbs.com (454:1/452)
  • From Barry Martin@454:1/1 to Nancy Backus on Wed Apr 15 10:01:00 2020

    Hi Nancy!

    I tend to be mostly impervious to advertising.... unless I'm already
    considering something, and have been already checking it out, their
    rhetoric doesn't get to me... :)
    But-but-but: it's New _and_ Improved!! <g>
    And.........??? <G>
    And?! But it's 'New' and 'Improved'!!' What more could one want?!! <g>
    Working, and doing what I need it to do....? <G> Oh, and not costing
    excessively, or actually not being any different from the previous
    item.... ;)
    Working better than before is always a nice thing! Even better is
    when I notice the proclaimed improvement and it actually does
    something. "Now with more bubbles!" is fine for a bubble bath but not necessarily for a car wash soap!
    Exactly... it is possible for a product to actually be improved,
    in a way that is useful.... ;) But often it's only hype... <G>

    Most of it is. I don't go around looking at the darker side of things
    but seems most of the 'new & improved' is for the manufacturer's
    benefit. Wide mouth in a Thermos is great for soup, stews, etc.;
    remember reading a 10% increase in the opening of items like toothpaste, ketchup, etc., caused the consumer to use more, so good for the seller,
    not necessarily good for the buyer as caused more to be used whne not necedssary.


    I'll tend to glance at the electronics (more computer) advertising,
    sort of to see what's out there, sort of for planning future computer
    builds/expansions.
    That somewhat makes sense... not so much planning on buying as
    keeping abreast on what might be happening...
    The 'buck/boost' device idea derived from a 'technical advertisement'.
    Will admit it took a few postings of the ad to finally catch.
    It finally dawned on you what good it might do YOU... ;)
    Yup! I had been thinking Zener diode which would 'buck' the high
    input voltage but would do nothing for the low input. For than I had a digital voltmeter: visually monitoring. Both of those have a bit of a flaw, which is probably why I didn't persue.
    Having something to handle both ends of the problem without your
    needing to intervene is indeed a useful thing... :)

    Right. Human monitoring and intervention is good up to a point; so is automated monitoring. A combination of both seems to be right for this instance.



    Hy-Vee announced last week they were temporarily discontinuing their
    print ad because they couldn't guarantee sufficient stock due to
    COVID-19 issues. Did have the on-line ad, at least for this week
    (effective date March 25), though IMO wasn't much in it; I probably
    would have skipped if it wasn't for me being across the street for the
    cards, etc., at Dollar General and needing a few things which rarely
    go on sale.
    Wegmans had discontinued theirs a couple of years ago... long before
    anything like this was happening.... We just do our weekly shopping...
    I have noticed, though, that some of the sales (noted from the shelf
    tags) have quietly ended early.... I guess there's no need to
    stimulate sales when one at the same time has to limit how much
    shoppers can buy at a time, with stocks diminishing too quickly... ;0
    There haven't been any new digital coupons either...
    I'm wondering if Hy-Vee (and other grocers and possibly retailers in general) will take this as an opportunity to cut back on their advertising? I'm sort of reluctant to eliminate print ads as I think
    they serve as a reminder ("remember us!") but I don't think short-term sales are necessary. Actually I find them rather annoying: so if I go Friday instead of Thursday I could save, but Fridays are inconvenient. ...Suppose not much different than it's on sale this week but not next.
    Wegmans has very few short-term (even just a week long) sales
    anymore... they went to longer term price reductions on things,
    like a couple of months or so.... the idea being that one doesn't
    have to binge-buy on something when it finally goes on sale, but
    can stock up gradually over the course of weeks... ;) That's
    been the case for maybe even a decade now... :)

    Hy-Vee might be going towards that: they established what is permanent
    pricing on a lot of items. Some of the sales have changed from a week
    to a couple/few weeks -- probably takes the urgency out of shopping but
    is nice to not have to rush out to buy, plus as you said can so a small
    stock up this week, another one next week -- easier on the budget!



    As for the lack of digital coupons, Clorox and the like don't need to advertise much less give money off; DiGiorno probably would still like
    to tempt customers away from Tony's. And redeemed coupons add several cents to the store's bottom line.
    I was thinking more of the store's own digital coupons... I've
    not been getting the digital manufacturer's coupons... only the
    paper ones when they happen to show up for things I buy anyway... :)

    Possibly due to different state regulations: I'd say most of Hy-Vee's
    digital coupons are manufacturers'. The one that seems to be an
    exclusion is Kraft: if their cheese has a coupon always need a paper
    one; I've never seen it as a digital coupon. The digital ad will also
    link the advertised item to the digital coupon; for Kraft cheese never
    has a "load coupon" button but some statement indicating need to clip
    the coupon out of the paper.



    Will be interesting to see what next week's electronic ad offers.
    Indeed. :)
    I was telling someone last week's Hy-Vee digital ad had over 1,000
    items while this week's had a little over 400. And their 99 orange
    juice (limit two) was sold out. (But I did get the last roll of Angel Soft toilet paper, plus I had a dollar off digital coupon!!)
    Win some, lose some... ;)

    Right now I would have preferred the orange juice over the toilet paper
    but my mind may change later!



    Barry_Martin_3@
    @Q.COM



    ... Out of my mind. Back in five minutes. Well, maybe.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.47
    wcECHO 4.2 ILink: The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA

    --- QScan/PCB v1.20a / 01-0462
    * Origin: ILink: CFBBS | cfbbs.no-ip.com | 856-933-7096 (454:1/1)
  • From Nancy Backus@454:1/452 to Barry Martin on Sat Apr 25 20:38:20 2020
    Quoting Barry Martin to Nancy Backus on 15-Apr-2020 10:01 <=-

    And?! But it's 'New' and 'Improved'!!' What more could one want?!! <g>
    Working, and doing what I need it to do....? <G> Oh, and not costing
    excessively, or actually not being any different from the previous
    item.... ;)
    Working better than before is always a nice thing! Even better is
    when I notice the proclaimed improvement and it actually does
    something. "Now with more bubbles!" is fine for a bubble bath but not
    necessarily for a car wash soap!
    Exactly... it is possible for a product to actually be improved,
    in a way that is useful.... ;) But often it's only hype... <G>
    Most of it is. I don't go around looking at the darker side of things
    but seems most of the 'new & improved' is for the manufacturer's
    benefit.

    Often merely even a chance to charge more for the same product and get
    away with it... ;0

    Wide mouth in a Thermos is great for soup, stews, etc.; remember
    reading a 10% increase in the opening of items like toothpaste,
    ketchup, etc., caused the consumer to use more, so good for the seller, not necessarily good for the buyer as caused more to be used when not necessary.

    If one doesn't realize that more is coming out the opening... eventually
    the buyer could figure it out, though, and go back to using the original amount, just squeezing a little less... :)

    The 'buck/boost' device idea derived from a 'technical advertisement'.
    Will admit it took a few postings of the ad to finally catch.
    It finally dawned on you what good it might do YOU... ;)
    Yup! I had been thinking Zener diode which would 'buck' the high
    input voltage but would do nothing for the low input. For than I had a
    digital voltmeter: visually monitoring. Both of those have a bit of a
    flaw, which is probably why I didn't persue.
    Having something to handle both ends of the problem without your
    needing to intervene is indeed a useful thing... :)
    Right. Human monitoring and intervention is good up to a point; so is automated monitoring. A combination of both seems to be right for
    this instance.

    Indeed. With the right tools, one can do the right combination... :)

    I have noticed, though, that some of the sales (noted from the shelf
    tags) have quietly ended early.... I guess there's no need to
    stimulate sales when one at the same time has to limit how much
    shoppers can buy at a time, with stocks diminishing too quickly... ;0
    There haven't been any new digital coupons either...
    I'm wondering if Hy-Vee (and other grocers and possibly retailers in
    general) will take this as an opportunity to cut back on their
    advertising? I'm sort of reluctant to eliminate print ads as I think
    they serve as a reminder ("remember us!") but I don't think short-term
    sales are necessary. Actually I find them rather annoying: so if I go
    Friday instead of Thursday I could save, but Fridays are inconvenient.
    ...Suppose not much different than it's on sale this week but not next.
    Wegmans has very few short-term (even just a week long) sales anymore..
    they went to longer term price reductions on things, like a couple of
    months or so.... the idea being that one doesn't have to binge-buy on
    something when it finally goes on sale, but can stock up gradually over
    the course of weeks... ;) That's been the case for maybe even a
    decade now... :)
    Hy-Vee might be going towards that: they established what is permanent pricing on a lot of items. Some of the sales have changed from a week
    to a couple/few weeks -- probably takes the urgency out of shopping
    but is nice to not have to rush out to buy, plus as you said can so a small stock up this week, another one next week -- easier on the
    budget!

    Exactly. :)

    As for the lack of digital coupons, Clorox and the like don't need to
    advertise much less give money off; DiGiorno probably would still like
    to tempt customers away from Tony's. And redeemed coupons add several
    cents to the store's bottom line.
    I was thinking more of the store's own digital coupons... I've not
    been getting the digital manufacturer's coupons... only the paper ones
    when they happen to show up for things I buy anyway... :)
    Possibly due to different state regulations: I'd say most of Hy-Vee's digital coupons are manufacturers'. The one that seems to be an
    exclusion is Kraft: if their cheese has a coupon always need a paper
    one; I've never seen it as a digital coupon. The digital ad will also link the advertised item to the digital coupon; for Kraft cheese never
    has a "load coupon" button but some statement indicating need to clip
    the coupon out of the paper.

    Might be state regulations, might just be store policy... Wegmans has a
    lot of really high quality (and sometimes price) store items, so a
    coupon to encourage the consumer to try it can be useful... There are
    some digital coupons on the Wegmans site for brand name products from
    time to time, just not as often... It does seem very strange, though,
    to not have any digital coupons available... I'm sure it's a passing
    thing, and probably related to needing to keep stock on the shelves, and
    with the crisis not knowing what will have the next run on it... ;)

    Will be interesting to see what next week's electronic ad offers.
    Indeed. :)
    I was telling someone last week's Hy-Vee digital ad had over 1,000
    items while this week's had a little over 400. And their 99 orange
    juice (limit two) was sold out. (But I did get the last roll of Angel
    Soft toilet paper, plus I had a dollar off digital coupon!!)
    Win some, lose some... ;)
    Right now I would have preferred the orange juice over the toilet
    paper but my mind may change later!

    Depending on what you were out of at the time... <G>

    ttyl neb

    ... BUDGET: an orderly approach to going into debt.

    --- EzyBlueWave V3.00 01FB001F
    * Origin: Tiny's BBS - http://www.tinysbbs.com (454:1/452)
  • From Barry Martin@454:1/1 to Nancy Backus on Sun Apr 26 10:43:00 2020

    Hi Nancy!

    And?! But it's 'New' and 'Improved'!!' What more could one want?!! <g>
    Working, and doing what I need it to do....? <G> Oh, and not costing
    excessively, or actually not being any different from the previous
    item.... ;)
    Working better than before is always a nice thing! Even better is
    when I notice the proclaimed improvement and it actually does
    something. "Now with more bubbles!" is fine for a bubble bath but not
    necessarily for a car wash soap!
    Exactly... it is possible for a product to actually be improved,
    in a way that is useful.... ;) But often it's only hype... <G>
    Most of it is. I don't go around looking at the darker side of things
    but seems most of the 'new & improved' is for the manufacturer's
    benefit.
    Often merely even a chance to charge more for the same product
    and get away with it... ;0

    Possibly and probably right: the 'new and improved' isn't the same as
    the original and so could be charged at a different rate. OTOH it might
    not be too good an idea to change the product and change the price: I'm thinking a price decrease could be interpreted as not as good as the
    original, a price increase interpreted as an opportunity to explore
    other brands as if the original had to be improved maybe it wasn't so
    good after all.


    Wide mouth in a Thermos is great for soup, stews, etc.; remember
    reading a 10% increase in the opening of items like toothpaste,
    ketchup, etc., caused the consumer to use more, so good for the seller, not necessarily good for the buyer as caused more to be used when not necessary.
    If one doesn't realize that more is coming out the opening...
    eventually the buyer could figure it out, though, and go back to
    using the original amount, just squeezing a little less... :)

    True, though I'm recalling the study stating the consumer was using more because of the increased flow, not adjusting back, and so the sales
    increased. I'd assume some consumers would realize the flow change and
    so cut back, but overall appears most kept the squeeze constant and so
    used more.


    The 'buck/boost' device idea derived from a 'technical advertisement'.
    Will admit it took a few postings of the ad to finally catch.
    It finally dawned on you what good it might do YOU... ;)
    Yup! I had been thinking Zener diode which would 'buck' the high
    input voltage but would do nothing for the low input. For than I had a
    digital voltmeter: visually monitoring. Both of those have a bit of a
    flaw, which is probably why I didn't persue.
    Having something to handle both ends of the problem without your
    needing to intervene is indeed a useful thing... :)
    Right. Human monitoring and intervention is good up to a point; so is automated monitoring. A combination of both seems to be right for
    this instance.
    Indeed. With the right tools, one can do the right
    combination... :)

    Right, though sometimes need to find the right tool exists!


    As for the lack of digital coupons, Clorox and the like don't need to
    advertise much less give money off; DiGiorno probably would still like
    to tempt customers away from Tony's. And redeemed coupons add several
    cents to the store's bottom line.
    I was thinking more of the store's own digital coupons... I've not
    been getting the digital manufacturer's coupons... only the paper ones
    when they happen to show up for things I buy anyway... :)
    Possibly due to different state regulations: I'd say most of Hy-Vee's digital coupons are manufacturers'. The one that seems to be an
    exclusion is Kraft: if their cheese has a coupon always need a paper
    one; I've never seen it as a digital coupon. The digital ad will also link the advertised item to the digital coupon; for Kraft cheese never
    has a "load coupon" button but some statement indicating need to clip
    the coupon out of the paper.
    Might be state regulations, might just be store policy... Wegmans
    has a lot of really high quality (and sometimes price) store
    items, so a coupon to encourage the consumer to try it can be
    useful... There are some digital coupons on the Wegmans site for
    brand name products from time to time, just not as often... It
    does seem very strange, though, to not have any digital coupons available... I'm sure it's a passing thing, and probably related
    to needing to keep stock on the shelves, and with the crisis not
    knowing what will have the next run on it... ;)

    My guess is more uncertainty over product availablity: sudden closure of
    a manufacturing (or import) facility, causing an unexpected drying up of
    the supply; can't put it on the shelf if don't have it. May be better
    to not entice the average consumer with a sale or coupon than to deal
    with the 'negative publicity' of implying the product would be
    available at a discount (sale/coupon).




    Will be interesting to see what next week's electronic ad offers.
    Indeed. :)
    I was telling someone last week's Hy-Vee digital ad had over 1,000
    items while this week's had a little over 400. And their 99 orange
    juice (limit two) was sold out. (But I did get the last roll of Angel
    Soft toilet paper, plus I had a dollar off digital coupon!!)
    Win some, lose some... ;)
    Right now I would have preferred the orange juice over the toilet
    paper but my mind may change later!
    Depending on what you were out of at the time... <G>

    That does tend to alter my needs perception! <gg>



    Barry_Martin_3@
    @Q.COM



    ... "He would be out of his depth in a parking lot puddle."
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.47
    wcECHO 4.2 ILink: The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA

    --- QScan/PCB v1.20a / 01-0462
    * Origin: ILink: CFBBS | cfbbs.no-ip.com | 856-933-7096 (454:1/1)
  • From Nancy Backus@454:1/452 to Barry Martin on Mon May 4 20:20:14 2020
    Quoting Barry Martin to Nancy Backus on 26-Apr-2020 10:43 <=-

    Exactly... it is possible for a product to actually be improved,
    in a way that is useful.... ;) But often it's only hype... <G>
    Most of it is. I don't go around looking at the darker side of things
    but seems most of the 'new & improved' is for the manufacturer's
    benefit.
    Often merely even a chance to charge more for the same product and get
    away with it... ;0
    Possibly and probably right: the 'new and improved' isn't the same as
    the original and so could be charged at a different rate. OTOH it
    might not be too good an idea to change the product and change the
    price: I'm thinking a price decrease could be interpreted as not as
    good as the original, a price increase interpreted as an opportunity to explore other brands as if the original had to be improved maybe it
    wasn't so good after all.

    Likely any price increase would be hidden.... It might be the same price
    per container, but the net weight or volume has decreased slightly...
    thinking that the customer is less likely to notice that sort of
    thing... ;)

    Wide mouth in a Thermos is great for soup, stews, etc.; remember
    reading a 10% increase in the opening of items like toothpaste,
    ketchup, etc., caused the consumer to use more, so good for the seller,
    not necessarily good for the buyer as caused more to be used when not
    necessary.
    If one doesn't realize that more is coming out the opening...
    eventually the buyer could figure it out, though, and go back to
    using the original amount, just squeezing a little less... :)
    True, though I'm recalling the study stating the consumer was using
    more because of the increased flow, not adjusting back, and so the
    sales increased. I'd assume some consumers would realize the flow
    change and so cut back, but overall appears most kept the squeeze
    constant and so used more.

    Maybe after the results of the study came out some more customers
    changed their usage as well... ;)

    The 'buck/boost' device idea derived from a 'technical advertisement'.
    Will admit it took a few postings of the ad to finally catch.
    It finally dawned on you what good it might do YOU... ;)
    Yup! I had been thinking Zener diode which would 'buck' the high
    input voltage but would do nothing for the low input. For than I had a
    digital voltmeter: visually monitoring. Both of those have a bit of a
    flaw, which is probably why I didn't persue.
    Having something to handle both ends of the problem without your
    needing to intervene is indeed a useful thing... :)
    Right. Human monitoring and intervention is good up to a point; so is
    automated monitoring. A combination of both seems to be right for
    this instance.
    Indeed. With the right tools, one can do the right combination... :)
    Right, though sometimes need to find the right tool exists!

    True... that always helps... ;)

    As for the lack of digital coupons, Clorox and the like don't need to
    advertise much less give money off; DiGiorno probably would still like
    to tempt customers away from Tony's. And redeemed coupons add several
    cents to the store's bottom line.
    I was thinking more of the store's own digital coupons... I've not
    been getting the digital manufacturer's coupons... only the paper ones
    when they happen to show up for things I buy anyway... :)
    Possibly due to different state regulations: I'd say most of Hy-Vee's
    digital coupons are manufacturers'. The one that seems to be an
    exclusion is Kraft: if their cheese has a coupon always need a paper
    one; I've never seen it as a digital coupon. The digital ad will also
    link the advertised item to the digital coupon; for Kraft cheese never
    has a "load coupon" button but some statement indicating need to clip
    the coupon out of the paper.
    Might be state regulations, might just be store policy... Wegmans has
    a lot of really high quality (and sometimes price) store items, so a
    coupon to encourage the consumer to try it can be useful... There are
    some digital coupons on the Wegmans site for brand name products from
    time to time, just not as often... It does seem very strange, though,
    to not have any digital coupons available... I'm sure it's a passing
    thing, and probably related to needing to keep stock on the shelves,
    and with the crisis not knowing what will have the next run on it.. ;)
    My guess is more uncertainty over product availablity: sudden closure
    of a manufacturing (or import) facility, causing an unexpected drying
    up of the supply; can't put it on the shelf if don't have it.

    That's another possibility...

    May be better to not entice the average consumer with a sale or
    coupon than to deal with the 'negative publicity' of implying the
    product would be available at a discount (sale/coupon).

    BJ's still has coupons available (although they just shifted to all done digitally or clipless instead of having paper coupons), but they have a disclaimer right there with the coupons that due to the current crisis,
    there might be disruptions in the supply or not sufficient goods on the shelves, and that there won't be any rainchecks for the time being... So
    they are trying to deflect any negative publicity issues, obviously...

    I was telling someone last week's Hy-Vee digital ad had over 1,000
    items while this week's had a little over 400. And their 99 orange
    juice (limit two) was sold out. (But I did get the last roll of Angel
    Soft toilet paper, plus I had a dollar off digital coupon!!)
    Win some, lose some... ;)
    Right now I would have preferred the orange juice over the toilet
    paper but my mind may change later!
    Depending on what you were out of at the time... <G>
    That does tend to alter my needs perception! <gg>

    Yup... <G>

    ttyl neb

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  • From Barry Martin@454:1/1 to Nancy Backus on Tue May 5 10:45:00 2020

    Hi Nancy!

    Exactly... it is possible for a product to actually be improved,
    in a way that is useful.... ;) But often it's only hype... <G>
    Most of it is. I don't go around looking at the darker side of things
    but seems most of the 'new & improved' is for the manufacturer's
    benefit.
    Often merely even a chance to charge more for the same product and get
    away with it... ;0
    Possibly and probably right: the 'new and improved' isn't the same as
    the original and so could be charged at a different rate. OTOH it
    might not be too good an idea to change the product and change the
    price: I'm thinking a price decrease could be interpreted as not as
    good as the original, a price increase interpreted as an opportunity to explore other brands as if the original had to be improved maybe it
    wasn't so good after all.
    Likely any price increase would be hidden.... It might be the
    same price per container, but the net weight or volume has
    decreased slightly... thinking that the customer is less likely
    to notice that sort of thing... ;)

    Yes: keep the price and container the same but less contents.


    Wide mouth in a Thermos is great for soup, stews, etc.; remember
    reading a 10% increase in the opening of items like toothpaste,
    ketchup, etc., caused the consumer to use more, so good for the seller,
    not necessarily good for the buyer as caused more to be used when not
    necessary.
    If one doesn't realize that more is coming out the opening...
    eventually the buyer could figure it out, though, and go back to
    using the original amount, just squeezing a little less... :)
    True, though I'm recalling the study stating the consumer was using
    more because of the increased flow, not adjusting back, and so the
    sales increased. I'd assume some consumers would realize the flow
    change and so cut back, but overall appears most kept the squeeze
    constant and so used more.
    Maybe after the results of the study came out some more customers
    changed their usage as well... ;)

    I would think a few would do a "so that's why the bigger opening!" and
    adjust their usage but the majority shrug it off and continue as they
    were.



    As for the lack of digital coupons, Clorox and the like don't need to <snip>
    May be better to not entice the average consumer with a sale or
    coupon than to deal with the 'negative publicity' of implying the
    product would be available at a discount (sale/coupon).
    BJ's still has coupons available (although they just shifted to
    all done digitally or clipless instead of having paper coupons),
    but they have a disclaimer right there with the coupons that due
    to the current crisis, there might be disruptions in the supply
    or not sufficient goods on the shelves, and that there won't be
    any rainchecks for the time being... So they are trying to
    deflect any negative publicity issues, obviously...

    Which to me is good: "if we can't get it we can't sell it to you". Not
    all that great from the consumer side to not have the raincheck but if
    the promotion is going on currently the discount is paid for by the
    supplier; if a raincheck then the discount is probably paid from the
    store's bottom line and right now they're probabky in the red due to all
    the other expenses like plastic bags (no consumer re-usables), masks, extra/specialized cleaning supplies, barriers.....


    I was telling someone last week's Hy-Vee digital ad had over 1,000
    items while this week's had a little over 400. And their 99 orange
    juice (limit two) was sold out. (But I did get the last roll of Angel
    Soft toilet paper, plus I had a dollar off digital coupon!!)
    Win some, lose some... ;)
    Right now I would have preferred the orange juice over the toilet
    paper but my mind may change later!
    Depending on what you were out of at the time... <G>
    That does tend to alter my needs perception! <gg>
    Yup... <G>

    And that reminded me: the coffee-flavourd M&Ms were a restricted-time offering. I was on eBay for something else (ended up not buying
    anywhere) and someone was selling just-expired packs (expiry April 17th
    or something) and someone else had listed packs with an expiry the end
    of May. Either one would have been OK but I wasn't sure of the
    quantity: looked like a single pack at $9.99 - so ten dollars. Uh, no.
    OK, so free shipping, but still seemed rather high for a little packet.
    I'm not spending my stimulus check on candy!



    Barry_Martin_3@
    @Q.COM



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