• Re: Radio Controlled Foru

    From Daryl Stout@954:895/7 to Mike Dippel on Tue Jul 20 07:32:00 2021
    Mike,

    It would be cool to have them join us here.

    I don't get on the air that much locally. The last several
    years, I'd be constantly interfered with, even if just passing
    routine traffic. There are several clubs in the central Arkansas
    area, but for years, there's petty bickering between each other,
    especially on "who does the better job during Skywarn Severe
    Weather". To me, in an emergency (i.e. a tornado outbreak, and
    we've had some of those in the region, such as on Jan. 21, 1999,
    with 56 tornadoes, most of those in just 6 hours), you need to
    drop all club affiliations, etc., and work toward passing traffic
    to aid in disaster recovery.

    Plus, where I'm at, I don't have any RF gear...never mind not
    being able to afford it, and we get intense lightning here from
    thunderstorms. I know Florida is the lightning capitol of the
    world, but at times, Arkansas gives them competition. In one
    storm, in an hour's time, there were nearly 10 strikes per
    second in Pulaski County (Little Rock).

    So, I operate only via the computer, with a ThumbDV, and the
    BlueDV program by a ham in the Netherlands (I think). I can
    still talk to folks around the world, and I don't have to worry
    about rigs, antennas, power supplies, coaxial cable, SWR meters,
    towers, etc. Basically, my ham radio license isn't "just a sheet
    of paper". When I mentioned that at an area hamfest 2 years ago
    (the last one held in Arkansas before COVID-19 restrictions were
    implemented), while doing a forum, I got a standing ovation. :)

    As an accredited Volunteer Examiner (I have been for 14 years),
    to give and grade license exams (the FCC originally did these at
    the area Federal Buildings, but the Volunteer Examiner Coordinator
    (VEC) program was created 35 years ago, where the hams themselves
    would do the testing), I've seen folks study the material, pay
    the fee to take the exam, then they do nothing else with their
    license. My question is "Why did they spend all that time and
    money??".

    Now, any hobby can be a financial black hole...one time, there
    was a "DC To Daylight" radio for $20,000. Now, I could outfit a
    nice "radio shack" for that, with several items; or even buy a
    nice pre-owned car, or take a nice Amtrak trip. But, for just one
    radio, to me, that's just overkill.

    Daryl, WX4QZ

    ... H.A.M. Radio Operator: H)ave A)nother M)eal.
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    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - Little Rock, Arkansas (954:895/7)
  • From Daryl Stout@954:895/7 to Mike Dippel on Wed Jul 21 08:36:00 2021
    Mike,

    I'm just 20 miles south of Tampa, and my understanding is that they get
    a LOT of lightning strikes. When Del Webb was planning out community,
    the study showed that it doesn't generally rain that much here so he called it Sun City Center. He was wrong!

    I've known several ham radio operators from that area that I've talked to
    (we term it as "worked") on the air.

    We have a volunteer Emergency Squad, and they can provide us with a
    2-way radio for $15.00 in case of emergencies. That is the closest I
    will ever get to HAM, although we do have a Ham Radio club in our community. We are going to purchase the radio soon. It would be a
    great thing to have, as well as the battery-operated radio which we already have.

    At least they got rid of the Morse Code requirement 14 years ago. Now,
    folks learn that because they WANT to, not because they have to. Here are
    4 cute stories on that.

    1) I asked one ham what his secret was to learning Morse Code. He replied
    "I learned all the dirty words first". <G>

    2) A club in Dallas was teaching Morse Code (we also term it as "CW" for "continuous wave"), and the first 4 letters they taught formed "the S expletive". But, when you looked at the dot and dash pattern, it made
    perfect sense.

    3) In Annapolis, Maryland, four guys were at a restaurant, telling each
    other dirty jokes in CW. This drop dead, gorgeous, curvaceous female
    walked up to them, and sternly admonished "You boys need to watch your language. I teach CW at the Naval Academy across the street", and she
    walked out. They were as red as tomatoes!! <BG>

    4) Another couple in New York were in a restaurant, "signing" (AMESLAN)
    dirty jokes to each other. Deaf people at a nearby table understood
    everything that was "signed". <G>

    I can see why you are so into HAM, living where you do. Have you had
    to use it for emergencies? I guess the answer would be a resounding
    YES.

    I actually saved someone's life with it. When the National Square Dance Convention was in Orlando in 1997, the last night of the event, the security guard at my hotel assaulted our shuttle bus driver. I used ham radio to call for help. The angel of The Lord was with me for 2 reasons:

    1) The guard had a gun, and could've shot me dead.
    2) A thunderstorm was in progress, and I could've been hit by lightning.

    When the fellow square dancers on the bus said "You saved his life", I
    said "This is what amatuer radio operators prepare for...emergency communications".

    I used to run "The Weather Watch Net", a precursor to "Arkansas Skywarn", when ham radio operators would go to the National Weather Service in North Little Rock. Arkansas gets "a double dose" from the east end of Tornado
    Alley to the west end of Dixie Alley...and most of our severe weather takes place after dark and before sunrise.

    One night, a tornado had hit the community of Atkins (where the pickles
    were made), so I was one of very few individuals on the radio (I even
    called the National Weather Service with storm reports). The tornado had
    hit around 1:30am. I was on the air before that, and at 3am, a ham said
    "Every time I turn on the radio during bad weather, you're here. Don't
    you ever sleep??!!". I sarcastically deadpanned "No. Next question", and
    busted out laughing. <BG>

    Daryl, WX4QZ

    ... H.A.M. Radio Operator: H)ave A)nother M)eal.
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    --- SBBSecho 3.14-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - Little Rock, Arkansas (954:895/7)
  • From Jimmy Anderson@954:895/1 to Daryl Stout on Fri Aug 20 09:34:00 2021
    DARYL STOUT wrote to MIKE DIPPEL <=-

    I don't get on the air that much locally. The last several
    years, I'd be constantly interfered with, even if just passing
    routine traffic. There are several clubs in the central Arkansas
    area, but for years, there's petty bickering between each other, especially on "who does the better job during Skywarn Severe
    Weather". To me, in an emergency (i.e. a tornado outbreak, and
    we've had some of those in the region, such as on Jan. 21, 1999,
    with 56 tornadoes, most of those in just 6 hours), you need to
    drop all club affiliations, etc., and work toward passing traffic
    to aid in disaster recovery.

    AGREED! During a recent bad weather bought I tried to sign in to
    a weather net to pass some info. Turns out the repeater had changed
    their PL Tone and I had missed it. I went to another local repeater
    and tried to get the info. No one answered (no real shock there -
    local traffic is few and far between) but within a minute or so
    someone on the other repeater gave the new PL Tone, but had a 'tone'
    in their voice like they didn't want to be bothered. I thought, "well,
    guess they don't need my input."

    I've turned the radio on twice since, and nothing - dead air, no
    call backs, etc. Next time I'm in my truck in Memphis or Nashville
    or Indy, though, there'll be plenty to talk to. :-)

    towers, etc. Basically, my ham radio license isn't "just a sheet
    of paper". When I mentioned that at an area hamfest 2 years ago
    (the last one held in Arkansas before COVID-19 restrictions were implemented), while doing a forum, I got a standing ovation. :)

    NICE!




    ... Daddy, what does FORMATTING DRIVE C MEAN?
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    wcQWK 8.0 Omicron Theta * Horn Lake, MS * winserver.org
    * Origin: The Hobby Line! BBS (954:895/1)
  • From Jimmy Anderson@954:895/1 to Mike Dippel on Fri Aug 20 09:38:00 2021
    MIKE DIPPEL wrote to DARYL STOUT <=-

    We have a volunteer Emergency Squad, and they can provide us with a
    2-way radio for $15.00 in case of emergencies. That is the closest I
    will ever get to HAM, although we do have a Ham Radio club in our community. We are going to purchase the radio soon. It would be a
    great thing to have, as well as the battery-operated radio which we already have.

    That's a cool idea!

    As for 'closest you'll ever get,' if you travel a lot and are interested
    in it, it CAN be cool! If you don't like talking to strangers, then no.
    :-)

    And you can get a handheld to keep in the camper - limited range, of
    course - for less than $50. Or you can install a mobile unit. This weekend
    is the Huntsville Hamfest, and four years ago I think it was, my wife and
    I went and I came home with TWO matching mobile rigs, antennas and mounting hardware for $625. I know prices are more, now, but I'm confident you can
    still get in for about $300 total.




    ... If everything seems to go right, check your zipper.
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    wcQWK 8.0 Omicron Theta * Horn Lake, MS * winserver.org
    * Origin: The Hobby Line! BBS (954:895/1)
  • From Daryl Stout@954:895/7 to Jimmy Anderson on Thu Aug 26 21:34:00 2021
    Jimmy,

    in their voice like they didn't want to be bothered. I thought, "well, guess they don't need my input."

    Sounds like they're snobbish.

    I've turned the radio on twice since, and nothing - dead air, no
    call backs, etc. Next time I'm in my truck in Memphis or Nashville
    or Indy, though, there'll be plenty to talk to. :-)

    Most repeaters, etc. are quiet, except during the nets.

    JA> NICE!

    I just wish that COVID-19 would've never occurred. It has really put a
    damper on so much. The Russellville, Arkansas Hamfest in 2020 was the
    last big hamfest in Arkansas before everything got locked down. The world's oldest Hamfest west of the Mississippi River (Mena, Arkansas...always the weekend after Labor Day), is still on, at least for now.

    ... Does "MNP-5" mean "Modem needs a 5 topping pizza"??
    === MultiMail/Win v0.52
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    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - Little Rock, Arkansas (954:895/7)