• one more time

    From Maurice Kinal@1:261/38 to All on Tue Jun 5 03:55:36 2018
    The last one buggered up the 0xfe character (3 of them) and for what ever reason changed them to 0xa4. So let us try it again;

    Wide ne bi wel, cw se e gehyrde on helle hriman.

    Looks okay in the editor but let us see what happens when it is saved.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-3
    * Origin: Prism bbs (1:261/38)
  • From Maurice Kinal@1:261/38 to Maurice Kinal on Tue Jun 5 03:56:24 2018
    The last one buggered up the 0xfe character (3 of them) and for what ever reason changed them to 0xa4. So let us try it again;
    Wide ne bi wel, cw se e gehyrde on helle hriman.
    Looks okay in the editor but let us see what happens when it is saved.

    Still buggered it up. ::sigh:::

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-3
    * Origin: Prism bbs (1:261/38)
  • From Ed Vance@1:2320/105 to Maurice Kinal on Tue Jun 5 09:58:00 2018
    06-05-18 03:56 Maurice Kinal wrote to Maurice Kinal about one more time
    Howdy! Maurice,

    @MSGID: <5B165F55.6090.fi-linux@capitolcityonline.net>
    @REPLY: <5B165F55.6089.fi-linux@capitolcityonline.net>
    The last one buggered up the 0xfe character (3 of them) and for what ever reason changed them to 0xa4. So let us try it again;
    Wide ne bi. wel, cw.. se .e gehyrde on helle hriman.
    Looks okay in the editor but let us see what happens when it is saved.

    Still buggered it up. ::sigh:::

    I thought I could read English but can't make any sense of those words.

    Looking at them made me think of a Tenth Grade High School English Teacher telling his class about Chaucer's writings.

    I couldn't make any sense of what he was trying to teach us back then.


    ... Health nuts will feel stupid lying in a hospital dying of nothing.
    --- MultiMail/MS-DOS v0.49
    * Origin: Capitol City Online - capitolcityonline.net (1:2320/105)
  • From Maurice Kinal@2:280/464.113 to Ed Vance on Tue Jun 5 15:38:02 2018
    Hallo Ed!

    I thought I could read English but can't make any sense of those
    words.

    Things are bad everywhere, said the man who heard wailing in hell.

    Looking at them made me think of a Tenth Grade High School
    English Teacher telling his class about Chaucer's writings.

    Chaucer wrote in middle English which is at least a couple centuries after the proverb in question was written (old English). We have to wait until Shakespeare before we see anything resembling what we call English.

    I couldn't make any sense of what he was trying to teach us back
    then.

    Like everything, practice makes perfect. I saw a linguist on a documentary who
    claimed if you read Chaucer aloud it starts making more sense. I claim that it
    is all Greek to me.

    Het leven is goed,
    Maurice

    ... Huil niet om mij, ik heb vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.23(1)-release (x86_64-bonnell-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's EuroPoint - Ladysmith BC, Canada (2:280/464.113)
  • From Ed Vance@1:2320/105 to Maurice Kinal on Tue Jun 5 19:33:00 2018
    06-05-18 15:38 Maurice Kinal wrote to Ed Vance about one more time
    Howdy! Maurice,

    @MSGID: <5B16F67F.6095.fi-linux@capitolcityonline.net>
    Hallo Ed!

    I thought I could read English but can't make any sense of those
    words.

    Things are bad everywhere, said the man who heard wailing in hell.

    Looking at them made me think of a Tenth Grade High School
    English Teacher telling his class about Chaucer's writings.

    Chaucer wrote in middle English which is at least a couple centuries
    after the proverb in question was written (old English). We have to
    wait until Shakespeare before we see anything resembling what we call English.

    I couldn't make any sense of what he was trying to teach us back
    then.

    Like everything, practice makes perfect. I saw a linguist on a documentary who claimed if you read Chaucer aloud it starts making more sense. I claim that it is all Greek to me.

    There is a story about one person saying that they were fluent in almost
    all Languages, except Greek, and asked the person they were with to tell
    him a word and ask him to say it in some other language.

    After hear the Word and what Language the person wanted to hear it in,
    the first person would hold up his hands and say "That's Greek to Me!".


    ... Each experiment, success or failure, is a learning experience.
    --- MultiMail/MS-DOS v0.49
    * Origin: Capitol City Online - capitolcityonline.net (1:2320/105)
  • From Mike Powell@1:2320/107 to Maurice Kinal on Tue Jun 5 18:29:00 2018
    Wide ne bi~ wel, cw~~ se ~e gehyrde on helle hriman.
    Looks okay in the editor but let us see what happens when it is saved.
    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-3
    * Origin: Prism bbs (1:261/38)

    Again, FWIW!

    Mike

    ---
    * SLMR 2.1a * Wrinkles only go where smiles have been - Jimmy Buffett


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    * Origin: moe's * 1-502-875-8938 * moetiki.ddns.net:27 (1:2320/107.0)
  • From Mike Powell@1:2320/107 to Maurice Kinal on Thu Jun 7 18:13:00 2018
    Like everything, practice makes perfect. I saw a linguist on a documentary who claimed if you read Chaucer aloud it starts making more sense. I claim that it is all Greek to me.

    I believe it actually does help, if you pronounce the words phonetically as
    you speak them.

    Mike

    ---
    * SLMR 2.1a * ....we came in?


    --- GTMail 1.26
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  • From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001 to Mike Powell on Fri Jun 8 05:21:48 2018
    Hey Mike!

    I believe it actually does help, if you pronounce the words
    phonetically as you speak them.

    I was just looking at some examples online and what you say can and does work for the Chaucer examples I saw. However for some of the earlier examples of Middle English my success rate was far worse since the examples hadn't evolved much from Old English. Looking at the Modern English translations later tald the tale.

    It's been ages since I've read any Chaucer.

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Don't cry for me I have vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.23(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's Brain - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001)
  • From Holger Granholm@2:20/228 to Mike Powell on Fri Jun 8 09:40:00 2018
    In a message on 06-07-18 Mike Powell said to Maurice Kinal:

    Hi Mike,

    Like everything, practice makes perfect. I saw a linguist on a documentary who claimed if you read Chaucer aloud it starts making more sense. I claim that it is all Greek to me.

    I believe it actually does help, if you pronounce the words
    phonetically as you speak them.

    Languages differ very much in how they should be spelled. Some
    languages, like italian and finnish, are pronounciated just like they
    are written, while others like spanish and french require your tongue
    to turn every way.


    Have a good night,

    Holger


    .. We are not retreating - we are advancing in another direction.
    -- MR/2 2.30


    --- PCBoard (R) v15.22 (OS/2) 2
    * Origin: Coming to you from the Sunny Aland Islands. (2:20/228)
  • From Mike Powell@1:2320/107 to Maurice Kinal on Fri Jun 8 19:16:00 2018
    It's been ages since I've read any Chaucer.

    True story -- what first got me interested in reading Chaucer was the line
    "as the Miller told his tale" in the song "A Whiter Shade of Pale" by
    Procal Harum. :) We did have to read a couple of the other tales in
    school, but that was the one I actually have read (more than once) without being told to. :)

    Mike

    ---
    * SLMR 2.1a * Spelling is a sober man's game


    --- GTMail 1.26
    * Origin: moe's * 1-502-875-8938 * moetiki.ddns.net:27 (1:2320/107.0)
  • From Maurice Kinal@2:280/464.113 to Mike Powell on Sat Jun 9 15:31:53 2018
    Hallo Mike!

    what first got me interested in reading Chaucer was the line "as
    MP: the Miller told his tale" in the song "A Whiter Shade of Pale" by
    Procal Harum.

    I remember it well. The timing sounds about right for both that song and Chaucer with respect to my awareness of such things.

    My recent searches were more Middle English centric and after looking at many examples I came to the conclusion that Chaucer isn't all that difficult to follow as I previously thought given the other examples of Middle English I found.

    Het leven is goed,
    Maurice

    ... Huil niet om mij, ik heb vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.23(1)-release (x86_64-bonnell-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's EuroPoint - Ladysmith BC, Canada (2:280/464.113)