• Riddle

    From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Anybody Interested on Sat Oct 28 23:50:48 2017
    Q. What do you call a big lizard with an extensive vocabulary?

    A. Thesaurus rex.




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Paul Quinn@3:640/1384 to Ardith Hinton on Sun Oct 29 17:54:23 2017
    Hi! Ardith,

    On 10/28/2017 11:50 PM, you wrote to Anybody Interested:

    Q. What do you call a big lizard with an extensive vocabulary?

    A. Thesaurus rex.

    Q. What do you call one who wants everyone else to know it has an extensive vocabulary?

    A. [insert preferred expletive] Annoying!

    Cheers,
    Paul.

    ... Then, suddenly and embarrassingly, my swash came unbuckled...
    ---
    * Origin: Quinn's Rock - Now upstairs & whizzing on Xubuntu!! (3:640/1384)
  • From alexander koryagin@3:640/384 to Ardith Hinton on Sun Oct 29 18:17:29 2017
    Hi, Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 28.10.2017 17:50

    Q. What do you call a big lizard with an extensive vocabulary?

    A. Thesaurus rex.


    I wonder who had invented Thesaurus Rex? I suspect he was a teacher who wanted to attract children to language learning. Children like horrible beasts. :)

    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    Thesaurus Rex
    The Thesaurus Rex is a lonely creature that lurks in abandoned mines. At 20 feet tall, he is a force to be reckoned with. Its name comes from the fact that
    it evolved from a Tyranosaurus Rex into a more knowledgable being. The monster is now capable of reading, writing and speaking human language. It spends its time expanding its vocabulary in a dim portion of the cave. Like its ancestors,
    this beast is territorial, so when a hero gets too close, it attacks without mercy.
    http://wiki.godvillegame.com/Thesaurus_Rex
    ----- The end of the citation -----

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    ENGLISH_TUTOR 2017

    --- Paul's Win98SE VirtualBox
    * Origin: Quinn's Post - Maryborough, Queensland, OZ (3:640/384)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to alexander koryagin on Thu Nov 2 23:52:25 2017
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    Q. What do you call a big lizard with an extensive
    vocabulary?

    A. Thesaurus rex.


    I wonder who had invented Thesaurus Rex?


    Dunno. Perhaps I should have guessed... but I hadn't realized such creatures actually exist, i.e. on the Internet at least. :-))



    I suspect he was a teacher who wanted to attract
    children to language learning.


    Or a gamer who knew his audience... [chuckle].



    Children like horrible beasts. :)


    Now that you mention it, I'm reminded of various works for children in which potentially scary beasts... like the monster in your citation... turn out to be quite harmless when one sees them from a different point of view. I think stories like this may help children learn to deal with their fears. :-)



    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    Thesaurus Rex
    The Thesaurus Rex is a lonely creature that lurks in
    abandoned mines. At 20 feet tall, he is a force to be
    reckoned with. Its name comes from the fact that it
    evolved from a Tyranosaurus Rex into a more knowledgable
    being. The monster is now capable of reading, writing
    and speaking human language. It spends its time expanding
    its vocabulary in a dim portion of the cave. Like its
    ancestors, this beast is territorial, so when a hero gets
    too close, it attacks without mercy.
    http://wiki.godvillegame.com/Thesaurus_Rex
    ----- The end of the citation -----


    Hmm. As a well-known British general once said, "Discretion is the better part of valour." This creature just wants to be left alone while he is reading etc. I know humans like that. If Our Hero wants to prove his manhood to *me* he won't do it by invading others' personal space & destroying what he doesn't understand. Kids often feel small & vulnerable. But a lot of stories in English seem to illustrate the triumph of Brain over Brawn as well.... ;-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)