• From a book

    From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to All on Fri Oct 12 14:35:32 2018
    Hi, all!

    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    The bus chugged westward. On both sides of the streets were interesting buildings. The Cowboy's Retreat was a log cabin fronted with flashing
    neon lights. The Emerald Crown was a hotel shaped like a wedding cake
    with a carpet that rolled down to the road like a green beach meeting a
    tarmac sea.
    ----- The end of the citation -----

    What is a green beach, what is a tarmac sea, and how can they meet? ;-)

    Alexander Koryagin
    english_tutor 2018

    ---
    * Origin: - nntp://news.fidonet.fi - Lake Ylo - Finland - (2:221/6)
  • From Michael Dukelsky@2:5020/1042 to Alexander Koryagin on Fri Oct 12 19:48:10 2018
    Hello Alexander,

    Friday October 12 2018, Alexander Koryagin wrote to All:

    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    The bus chugged westward. On both sides of the streets were
    interesting buildings. The Cowboy's Retreat was a log cabin fronted
    with flashing neon lights. The Emerald Crown was a hotel shaped like a wedding cake with a carpet that rolled down to the road like a green
    beach meeting a tarmac sea.
    ----- The end of the citation -----

    What is a green beach, what is a tarmac sea, and how can they meet?
    ;-)

    訩 㯠 䠫஢ ண ( 䠫).

    Michael

    ... node (at) f1042 (dot) ru
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: Moscow, Russia (2:5020/1042)
  • From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to Michael Dukelsky on Fri Oct 12 21:01:40 2018
    Hi, Michael Dukelsky!
    I read your message from 12.10.2018 19:48

    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    The bus chugged westward. On both sides of the streets were
    interesting buildings. The Cowboy's Retreat was a log cabin
    fronted with flashing neon lights. The Emerald Crown was a hotel
    shaped like a wedding cake with a carpet that rolled down to the
    road like a green beach meeting a tarmac sea.
    ----- The end of the citation -----

    What is a green beach, what is a tarmac sea, and how can they
    meet?

    訩 㯠 䠫஢ ண ( 䠫).

    Thanx, but actually this is a pure English echo, and it would be good to write explanation in English. So that it could be checked by the native speakers here. ;-)

    Bye, Michael!
    Alexander Koryagin
    english_tutor 2018

    ---
    * Origin: - nntp://news.fidonet.fi - Lake Ylo - Finland - (2:221/6)
  • From Paul Quinn@3:640/1384.125 to Michael Dukelsky on Sat Oct 13 09:54:09 2018
    Hi! Michael,

    On 10/13/2018 02:48 AM, you wrote to Alexander Koryagin:

    What is a green beach, what is a tarmac sea, and how can they meet?
    ;-)

    Заросший пляж вплотную подступает к
    асфальтированной дороге (морю
    асфальта)
    Translated by Bing...

    Overgrown beach is close to the paved road (Sea of asphalt).

    Bad boy. :)

    Some Russian fellers take too much to heart and think that every written thing ought to be taken literally. I think there is some literary licence being taken by the author of that passage. When I first read it I thought that someone had discovered the Blues Brothers but, no.

    Then there seemed to be an oblique reference to the artwork style (coloured sequences) in the 'Wizard Of Oz' 1930s film. I think my latter idea is close.

    Cheers,
    Paul.

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux i686; rv:31.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/31.4.0
    * Origin: So Many Messages! So Little Time! (3:640/1384.125)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Paul Quinn on Sun Oct 14 11:56:41 2018
    Hi, Paul! Recently you wrote in a message to Michael Dukelsky:

    Translated by Bing...

    Overgrown beach is close to the paved road (Sea of asphalt).

    Bad boy. :)

    Some Russian fellers take too much to heart and think that
    every written thing ought to be taken literally.


    IMHO the first half of the translated version needs a bit more work,
    but the tarmac sea/sea of asphalt does appear to be a paved road.... :-)

    I know Canadians... i.e. native speakers of English... who also take
    things literally. One of them admitted to Dallas & me privately that he didn't
    understand metaphors unless he could look them up in the dictionary, yet he was
    quite intelligent in other ways. And I think those who are learning English as
    a foreign language or depending on computer software to translate for them tend
    to find themselves in much the same position.

    One way some people have fun with the latter is to give the software
    a metaphorical expression which is well-known in English, then see what happens
    after it's been translated into another language & back again into English. In
    an example I read about long ago "The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak"
    came back as "The liquor is good, but the meat is rotten". Although I have yet
    to try that myself, I experimented briefly with a program Dallas had on his BBS
    at one time. IIRC it was called LIZA, and I'd heard about it as a student. It
    was originally meant to be used in counselling situations where what people may
    need is somebody who will listen patiently & make occasional sympathetic noises
    while they think aloud but doesn't expect to be paid more than they can afford.
    I'd seen BBS users spend half an hour talking to LIZA before they realized they
    were talking to a computer, but since I already realized that I gave her a very
    simple test. When she said "How are you?" she expected a conventional response ... and I used a deliberately unconventional response to see what would happen.
    I quoted a line from THE MUPPET MUSICIANS OF BREMEN: "I'm old... I'm beat up...
    I'm worn away", to which LIZA answered "I'm twenty-three years old". If I need
    somebody who understands where I'm coming from I won't count on *her*.... :-))



    I think there is some literary licence being taken
    by the author of that passage.


    I agree. And give yourself a gold star, BTW, for knowing whether to
    spell "licence/license" in this context as a noun or a verb.... :-)



    When I first read it I thought that someone had discovered
    the Blues Brothers but, no.


    OTOH there's something about the rustic cabin with neon lights which
    reminds me of the Blues Brothers attempting to play a C&W gig... [chuckle].



    Then there seemed to be an oblique reference to the artwork
    style (coloured sequences) in the 'Wizard Of Oz' 1930s film.
    I think my latter idea is close.


    I think you're close on both counts.

    In the Emerald City, where the wizard lived, everything was green...
    but now we're talking about a different hotel. If I put the two ideas together
    I imagine the narrator is referring to someplace like Las Vegas, where there is
    an air of unreality about everything. When I visited this city years ago there
    was a hotel with a neon sign cowboy who tipped his hat & said "Hi, Pardner!" at
    all hours of the day & night, and there were many "wedding chapels" where folks
    could get married after a quickie divorce in Reno. But I wouldn't expect other
    folks to draw such conclusions if they live eighteen hours away by air.... :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Paul Quinn@3:640/1384.125 to Ardith Hinton on Mon Oct 15 07:31:15 2018
    Hi! Ardith,

    On 10/14/2018 11:56 AM, you wrote:

    IMHO the first half of the translated version needs a bit
    more work, but the tarmac sea/sea of asphalt does appear to be a paved road.... :-)

    Yes, Michael is more likely correct.

    I'm beat up... I'm worn away", to which LIZA answered "I'm twenty-three years old". If I need somebody who understands where I'm coming from I won't count on *her*.... :-))

    I had a similar experience in 1998, from an on-looker's perspective during a sysop-hosted users' BBQ. One of my users (a student/mate from our class at a tech college) was logged in locally to the BBS and was enjoying an on-line discussion, which went for at least 10 minutes. He had a ton of fun with it. It was something of a disappointment to him when I told him later that it was an AI chat program. 8-)

    OTOH there's something about the rustic cabin with neon
    lights which reminds me of the Blues Brothers attempting to play a C&W gig... [chuckle].

    I think we both have seen the flick too many times.

    In the Emerald City, where the wizard lived, everything was green... but now we're talking about a different hotel. If I put the
    two ideas together I imagine the narrator is referring to someplace like Las Vegas, where there is an air of unreality about everything.

    Yes. I fear we will have to wait for Alexander's comments (including potential
    clarification), after he returns from chasing the last days of summer in Moscow
    over the weekend. ;)

    Cheers,
    Paul.

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux i686; rv:31.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/31.4.0
    * Origin: Who killed Laura Palmer? (3:640/1384.125)
  • From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to Ardith Hinton on Mon Oct 15 10:41:44 2018
    Hi, Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 14.10.2018 11:56


    In the Emerald City, where the wizard lived, everything was
    green... but now we're talking about a different hotel. If I put
    the two ideas together I imagine the narrator is referring to
    someplace like Las Vegas, where there is an air of unreality about everything. When I visited this city years ago there was a hotel
    with a neon sign cowboy who tipped his hat & said "Hi, Pardner!" at
    all hours of the day & night, and there were many "wedding chapels"
    where folks could get married after a quickie divorce in Reno. But
    I wouldn't expect other folks to draw such conclusions if they live eighteen hours away by air.... :-)

    Yes, the heroes of the novel were in Los Angeles, in the area where film stars live.

    PS: If somebody wants to look at the original text of the book in question ("Molly Moon Stops the World", by Georgia Byng), I have temporarily put its PDF
    version here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Fa1Q6yeh1SNMpgI55jRb7YmxDpD7nGai

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    english_tutor 2018

    ---
    * Origin: - nntp://news.fidonet.fi - Lake Ylo - Finland - (2:221/6)
  • From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to Paul Quinn on Mon Oct 15 10:54:08 2018
    Paul Quinn -> Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 15.10.2018 00:31

    IMHO the first half of the translated version needs a bit more
    work, but the tarmac sea/sea of asphalt does appear to be a paved
    road.... :-)

    Yes, Michael is more likely correct.

    <skipped>
    the two ideas together I imagine the narrator is referring to
    someplace like Las Vegas, where there is an air of unreality about
    everything.

    Yes. I fear we will have to wait for Alexander's comments
    (including potential clarification), after he returns from chasing
    the last days of summer in Moscow over the weekend. ;)

    No comment from my side. As we say in Russia, I am listening to and wind it on my whisker. ;-) I hope I will have some more questions, reading that book. I read it because a paper book is much better for language learning than the e-version of a book. I can make marks and remarks with my pencil.

    Bye, Paul!
    Alexander Koryagin
    english_tutor 2018

    ---
    * Origin: - nntp://news.fidonet.fi - Lake Ylo - Finland - (2:221/6)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Alexander Koryagin on Tue Oct 16 17:56:59 2018
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to All:

    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    The bus chugged westward. On both sides of the streets
    were interesting buildings. The Cowboy's Retreat was a
    log cabin fronted with flashing neon lights. The Emerald
    Crown was a hotel shaped like a wedding cake with a carpet
    that rolled down to the road like a green beach meeting
    a tarmac sea.
    ----- The end of the citation -----


    What is a green beach, what is a tarmac sea, and how
    can they meet?


    The word "like" tells me the author is making a comparison here... technically a simile. I imagine the carpet as a lawn, possibly made of fake grass, and the tarmac sea as a paved road. Apparently one part of this lawn ends at the side of the road, i.e. the lawn & the road come into contact. I also get the impression the lawn is uninterrupted by anything else such as a fence, a bit of shrubbery, or a public walkway. Maybe it's supposed to look like the red carpet which is rolled out for visiting heads of state. In any case, the narrator is thinking of it as a beach adjacent to the sea.... :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Michael Dukelsky@2:5020/1042 to Ardith Hinton on Wed Oct 17 13:08:38 2018
    Hello Ardith,

    Tuesday October 16 2018, Ardith Hinton wrote to Alexander Koryagin:

    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    The bus chugged westward. On both sides of the streets
    were interesting buildings. The Cowboy's Retreat was a
    log cabin fronted with flashing neon lights. The Emerald
    Crown was a hotel shaped like a wedding cake with a carpet
    that rolled down to the road like a green beach meeting
    a tarmac sea.
    ----- The end of the citation -----

    What is a green beach, what is a tarmac sea, and how
    can they meet?

    The word "like" tells me the author is making a comparison here... technically a simile. I imagine the carpet as a lawn,
    possibly made of fake grass, and the tarmac sea as a paved road. Apparently one part of this lawn ends at the side of the road, i.e.
    the lawn & the road come into contact.

    This is what I meant except I thought of not fake but real grass.

    In any case, the narrator is thinking of it as a beach adjacent to the sea.... :-)

    Exactly.

    BTW I was named a bad boy here but I consider it a compliment, since I was a boy very long ago. :)

    Michael

    ... node (at) f1042 (dot) ru
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: Moscow, Russia (2:5020/1042)
  • From Paul Quinn@3:640/1384 to Michael Dukelsky on Wed Oct 17 20:24:18 2018
    Hi! Michael,

    On 17 Oct 18 13:08, you wrote to Ardith Hinton:

    BTW I was named a bad boy here but I consider it a compliment, since I
    was a boy very long ago. :)

    I've been a bad boy for longer than you. ;)

    Cheers,
    Paul.

    ... No smoke or sparks! ...Hmmm... Must be a software problem then...
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20130515
    * Origin: Quinn's Rock - Live from Paul's Xubuntu desktop! (3:640/1384)
  • From Michael Dukelsky@2:5020/1042 to Paul Quinn on Wed Oct 17 20:31:42 2018
    Hello Paul,

    Wednesday October 17 2018, Paul Quinn wrote to Michael Dukelsky:

    BTW I was named a bad boy here but I consider it a compliment,
    since I was a boy very long ago. :)

    I've been a bad boy for longer than you. ;)

    How do you know? :)

    Michael

    ... node (at) f1042 (dot) ru
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: Moscow, Russia (2:5020/1042)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Alexander Koryagin on Thu Oct 18 23:28:12 2018
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    [...] I imagine the narrator is referring to someplace
    like Las Vegas, where there is an air of unreality about
    everything. When I visited this city years ago there was
    a hotel with a neon sign cowboy who tipped his hat & said
    "Hi, Pardner!" at all hours of the day & night, and there
    were many "wedding chapels" where folks could get married
    after a quickie divorce in Reno. But I wouldn't expect
    other folks to draw such conclusions if they live eighteen
    hours away by air.... :-)


    I wasn't forgetting you there, BTW. At a rough estimate I think you would be +/- the same distance away as Paul... in the opposite direction. ;-)



    Yes, the heroes of the novel were in Los Angeles, in the
    area where film stars live.


    Ah... that explains a lot. In your original citation there was a bus
    chugging westward, presumably carrying at least one of these heroes. Las Vegas
    is four hours by road east of Los Angeles. And I can well imagine how somebody
    from further east who is hoping to obtain a job in the film industry might pass
    through Las Vegas en route to Los Angeles.

    I suppose the bus might have been carrying actors from one scene in a
    movie set to another, but in that case the direction of travel would be of very
    little significance to the reader. From what I remember of Los Angeles there's
    nothing particularly unusual about the architecture. OTOH the economy seems to
    depend quite a bit less on entertainment & tourism than that of Las Vegas. :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Michael Dukelsky on Tue Oct 23 20:20:04 2018
    Hi, Michael! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    The bus chugged westward. On both sides of the streets
    were interesting buildings. The Cowboy's Retreat was a
    log cabin fronted with flashing neon lights. The Emerald
    Crown was a hotel shaped like a wedding cake with a carpet
    that rolled down to the road like a green beach meeting
    a tarmac sea.
    ----- The end of the citation -----

    What is a green beach, what is a tarmac sea, and how
    can they meet?

    The word "like" tells me the author is making a comparison
    here... technically a simile. I imagine the carpet as a
    lawn, possibly made of fake grass, and the tarmac sea as a
    paved road. Apparently one part of this lawn ends at the
    side of the road, i.e. the lawn & the road come into contact.

    This is what I meant except I thought of not fake but real
    grass.


    I thought of real grass initially, because a well-kept lawn is often
    described as a carpet in English. But since there was no mention of a sidewalk
    I began to wonder how the prospective bride would get to the front door of this
    establishment without messing up her new shoes (or whatever). I am troubled by
    the idea that while other people's lawn parties are planned well in advance the
    maintenance is too... yet hotels must be prepared to accept guests at any time.
    In an environment where a lot of other things seem contrived their guests might
    settle for fake grass which needn't be mowed, fertilized, &/or watered.... :-)

    If the hotel had substituted a bit of "indoor-outdoor" carpeting I'd
    expect to see a comma after "cake". I am much relieved because I've yet to see
    a carpet under a wedding cake. A table cloth would be more usual... [chuckle].



    In any case, the narrator is thinking of it as a beach
    adjacent to the sea.... :-)

    Exactly.


    And it would appear to me that Bing did you an injustice. I have no
    idea how "adjacent" translates into Russian, but I see how in English the exact
    interpretation may depend on the context. IMHO we're on the same page.... :-)



    BTW I was named a bad boy here but I consider it a
    compliment, since I was a boy very long ago. :)


    In Aussie lingo, I think it probably is a compliment. :-))




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Michael Dukelsky@2:5020/1042 to Ardith Hinton on Wed Oct 24 22:38:28 2018
    Hello Ardith,

    Tuesday October 23 2018, Ardith Hinton wrote to Michael Dukelsky:

    I thought of real grass initially, because a well-kept lawn
    is often described as a carpet in English. But since there was no
    mention of a sidewalk I began to wonder how the prospective bride
    would get to the front door of this establishment without messing up
    her new shoes (or whatever). I am troubled by the idea that while
    other people's lawn parties are planned well in advance the
    maintenance is too... yet hotels must be prepared to accept guests at
    any time. In an environment where a lot of other things seem contrived their guests might settle for fake grass which needn't be mowed, fertilized, &/or watered.... :-)

    A well thought-out consideration.

    If the hotel had substituted a bit of "indoor-outdoor" carpeting I'd expect to see a comma after "cake". I am much relieved because I've yet to see a carpet under a wedding cake. A table cloth would be more usual... [chuckle].

    :-))

    In any case, the narrator is thinking of it as a beach
    adjacent to the sea.... :-)

    Exactly.

    And it would appear to me that Bing did you an injustice.

    Automatic translation is still not so good, and though Google Translate works better than Bing, there is much space for improvement. For justice, it should be noted that earlier the automatic translation was much worse. So obviously there is some progress.

    I have no idea how "adjacent" translates into Russian, but I see how
    in English the exact interpretation may depend on the context. IMHO
    we're on the same page.... :-)

    I can translate the phrase I wrote in Russian this way: "An overgrown beach comes right up to a paved road (asphalt sea)".

    Michael

    ... node (at) f1042 (dot) ru
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: Moscow, Russia (2:5020/1042)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Alexander Koryagin on Thu Oct 25 12:46:13 2018
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to Paul Quinn:

    As we say in Russia, I am listening to
    |i.e. listening to what Paul is saying?

    and wind it on my whisker. ;-)
    |"winding" would make a better parallelism here.


    Like a man twirling his handlebar moustache? Cute.... :-)



    I hope I will have some more questions,
    reading that book.


    As do I! IMHO you ask interesting questions, and if it weren't for people like you I'd be talking to myself & enjoying the echo a lot less. :-))



    I read it because a paper book is much better for
    language learning than the e-version of a book. I
    can make marks and remarks with my pencil.


    I often did that as a university student, when I was reading French novels & had to buy my own textbooks. IMHO the bit you cited here is on a par with some of the flowery descriptions where I made a lot of notes too.... :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to Ardith Hinton on Fri Oct 26 20:33:54 2018
    Hi, Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 25.10.2018 12:46

    As we say in Russia, I am listening to
    |i.e. listening to what Paul is saying?

    Yes.

    and wind it on my whisker.
    |"winding" would make a better parallelism here.

    Like a man twirling his handlebar moustache? Cute....

    It is a Russian idiom. Long ago, when a person heard an interesting piece of information he would wind his whisker around his finger contemplating it. :) Why does it help to memorize or think? I suspect it is in the same way as nape scratching helps. ;-)

    I hope I will have some more questions, reading that book.

    As do I! IMHO you ask interesting questions, and if it weren't for
    people like you I'd be talking to myself & enjoying the echo a lot
    less. :-))

    Do you know that some people created Fidonet clients for mobile phones and tablet computers. So we can expect that some day new people will join us. IMHO the Fidonet style text messaging makes chats more intelligent. People will recall what the forgot.

    I read it because a paper book is much better for language
    learning than the e-version of a book. I can make marks and
    remarks with my pencil.

    I often did that as a university student, when I was reading French
    novels & had to buy my own textbooks. IMHO the bit you cited here
    is on a par with some of the flowery descriptions where I made a
    lot of notes too....

    I wonder when will they invent an e-book where I will be able to make remarks using a digital stylus pen? :)

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    english_tutor 2018

    ---
    * Origin: - nntp://news.fidonet.fi - Lake Ylo - Finland - (2:221/6.0)
  • From Dallas Hinton@1:153/7715 to Alexander Koryagin on Sun Oct 28 02:25:14 2018
    Hi Alexander -- on Oct 26 2018 at 20:33, you wrote:

    I wonder when will they invent an e-book where I will be able to
    make remarks using a digital stylus pen? :)

    Already done -- Apple iBooks and Amazon Kindle both allow exactly that -- on an
    iPhone or iPad you have to use your finger unless you purchase an after-market stylus, but I use this technology in books and music, and it works very well!


    Cheers... Dallas

    --- timEd/NT 1.30+
    * Origin: The BandMaster, Vancouver, CANADA (1:153/7715)
  • From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to Dallas Hinton on Mon Oct 29 10:29:14 2018
    Hi, Dallas Hinton!
    I read your message from 28.10.2018 04:25

    I wonder when will they invent an e-book where I will be able to
    make remarks using a digital stylus pen? :)

    Already done -- Apple iBooks and Amazon Kindle both allow exactly
    that -- on an iPhone or iPad you have to use your finger unless you purchase an after-market stylus, but I use this technology in books
    and music, and it works very well!

    What is a format these books are made? Theoretically, it should be a dot-matrix, raster format.

    Bye, Dallas!
    Alexander Koryagin
    english_tutor 2018

    ---
    * Origin: - nntp://news.fidonet.fi - Lake Ylo - Finland - (2:221/6.0)
  • From Dallas Hinton@1:153/7715 to Alexander Koryagin on Mon Oct 29 11:58:47 2018
    Hi Alexander -- on Oct 29 2018 at 10:29, you wrote:

    What is a format these books are made? Theoretically, it should be a dot-matrix, raster format.

    I can't speak to that aspect, but there are several widely-accepted formats in use:

    EPUB
    The ePub format is an open format designed by the Open eBook Forum and developed by the International Digital Publishing Forum. Based on XHTML and XML.

    AZW
    This is an Amazon format used exclusively on the Amazon Kindle. It is basically a MOBI format that uses a high compression option.

    LIT
    This is an e-book format developed for the Microsoft Reader software.

    PDF
    The Portable Document Format was created by Adobe for its Acrobat products.

    ODF
    OpenDocument Format, XML-based file format, which is the default format for OpenOffice, an open source productivity suite that is becoming a popular alternative to Microsoft Office.

    MOBI
    The e-book format used by the MobiPocket Reader


    Cheers... Dallas

    --- timEd/NT 1.30+
    * Origin: The BandMaster, Vancouver, CANADA (1:153/7715)
  • From Dallas Hinton@1:153/7715 to Alexander Koryagin on Mon Oct 29 12:20:30 2018
    Hi Alexander -- on Oct 29 2018 at 10:29, you wrote:

    What is a format these books are made? Theoretically, it should be a dot-matrix, raster format.

    I should also mention a program called Calibre (http://calibre-ebook.com) which
    is available for windows, mac, linus, portable, and windows 64.

    Calibre functions as a library indexing program, a reader, and converts among all the common ebook formats. AND it's free!

    Oh, yes, and it's available in English, Estonian, French, Spanich, Swedish, and
    Ukrainian (sorry, no Russian that I'm aware of).


    Cheers... Dallas

    --- timEd/NT 1.30+
    * Origin: The BandMaster, Vancouver, CANADA (1:153/7715)
  • From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to Dallas Hinton on Tue Oct 30 12:49:06 2018
    Hi, Dallas Hinton!
    I read your message from 29.10.2018 12:58

    What is a format these books are made? Theoretically, it should be
    a dot-matrix, raster format.

    I can't speak to that aspect, but there are several widely-accepted formats in use:

    EPUB The ePub format is an open format designed by the Open eBook
    Forum and developed by the International Digital Publishing Forum.
    Based on XHTML and XML.

    AZW This is an Amazon format used exclusively on the Amazon Kindle.
    It is basically a MOBI format that uses a high compression option.

    LIT This is an e-book format developed for the Microsoft Reader
    software.

    PDF The Portable Document Format was created by Adobe for its
    Acrobat products.

    ODF OpenDocument Format, XML-based file format, which is the
    default format for OpenOffice, an open source productivity suite
    that is becoming a popular alternative to Microsoft Office.

    MOBI The e-book format used by the MobiPocket Reader

    Well, can you take an e-text made according to some of the above mentioned formats and correct errors with red ink, using a sharp stylus as a teacher pen?
    Then you should be able to save the text and send it to the pupil. ;-)

    Bye, Dallas!
    Alexander Koryagin
    english_tutor 2018

    ---
    * Origin: - nntp://news.fidonet.fi - Lake Ylo - Finland - (2:221/6.0)
  • From Dallas Hinton@1:153/7715 to Alexander Koryagin on Tue Oct 30 23:37:55 2018
    Hi Alexander -- on Oct 30 2018 at 12:49, you wrote:

    Well, can you take an e-text made according to some of the above
    mentioned formats and correct errors with red ink, using a sharp
    stylus as a teacher pen? Then you should be able to save the text
    and send it to the pupil. ;-)

    Well (said with some hesitancy) yes. It depends on a number of issues -- primarily what platform you're using and what device. EPub doesn't play this game at all. PDF can be easily annotated if you use either the full Adobe Acrobat program (expensive) or one of the free clones such as Foxfire PDF reader. Kindle also allows for marking up the text, but it's not quite as friendly for sharing that mark up.

    Foxfire PDF is for Windows, btw, so you have to position the cursor with a mouse, then type. Not a big deal. On an iPad (probably on other tablets but I've no personal experience) you can actually write on the PDF with a stylus, dependng on which program you use (I like PDF Expert, personally).


    Cheers... Dallas

    --- timEd/NT 1.30+
    * Origin: The BandMaster, Vancouver, CANADA (1:153/7715)
  • From Dallas Hinton@1:153/7715 to Alexander Koryagin on Wed Oct 31 23:10:12 2018
    Hi Alexander -- on Oct 31 2018 at 10:54, you wrote:

    I don't want to type because not everything can be typed. I want to
    _write_ my marks like I do it with my felt-tip pen.

    Ah, well then -- you'd have to use a tablet of some brand (I use an iPad, fwiw)
    and an appropriate stylus - then you can handwrite to your heart's content!! Of
    course, there are touch screens for laptops and desktops (the latter is very impractical imo). The laptop touch screens are cumbersome, workable, but expensive. An iPad is a very satisfactory solution but still expensive!


    Cheers... Dallas

    --- timEd/NT 1.30+
    * Origin: The BandMaster, Vancouver, CANADA (1:153/7715)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Michael Dukelsky on Thu Nov 8 23:32:19 2018
    Hi, Michael! Awhile ago you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    I am troubled by the idea that while other people's lawn
    parties are planned well in advance the maintenance is
    too... yet hotels must be prepared to accept guests at
    any time. In an environment where a lot of other things
    seem contrived their guests might settle for fake grass
    which needn't be mowed, fertilized, &/or watered.... :-)

    A well thought-out consideration.


    Thankyou.... :-)



    Automatic translation is still not so good, and though
    Google Translate works better than Bing, there is much
    space for improvement.


    AFAIC translation is as much an art as a science, and while computers
    may be more efficient than humans are at calculating the value of pi to umpteen
    decimal points humans may do better with connotations & multiple meanings. ;-)



    For justice, it should be noted that earlier the
    automatic translation was much worse. So obviously
    there is some progress.


    So I gather... and I know spelling checkers have improved a lot since
    the days when Fidonetters made jokes like:

    I halve a spelling chequer;
    It came with my pea sea.

    Search engines, for that matter, are becoming more efficient too as they follow
    the procedure of allowing us to choose from a list what works best for us. :-)



    I can translate the phrase I wrote in Russian this way:
    "An overgrown beach comes right up to a paved road
    (asphalt sea)".


    I'm not sure about "overgrown beach"... but the rest is fine with me.
    The problem is that whereas a neglected garden might be described as overgrown,
    because e.g. nobody has done any weeding or pruning recently & Mother Nature is
    taking control, little or no plant life could survive for very long on what I'd
    refer to as a beach. Here on the Pacific Coast a beach consists mainly of sand
    &/or smooth stones which may be underwater half the time & get pounded by waves
    on a regular basis. I may be thinking a bit too much, of course... [wry grin].




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Alexander Koryagin on Tue Nov 13 23:36:58 2018
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    and wind it on my whisker.
    |"winding" would make a better parallelism here.

    Like a man twirling his handlebar moustache? Cute....

    It is a Russian idiom. Long ago, when a person heard
    an interesting piece of information he would wind his
    whisker around his finger contemplating it. :)


    Hmm... yes, I suppose one could do that with a beard as well. In my
    experience a moustache isn't usually long enough to wind around anything unless
    it's the century-old style I alluded to. If so I'd make "whisker" plural, BTW.

    What I had in mind was more like using one's fingertips to shape the
    ends of the moustache. Both men & women, however, sometimes curl a few strands
    of head hair around an index finger while they're thinking.... :-)



    Why does it help to memorize or think?
    I suspect it is in the same way as nape scratching
    helps. ;-)


    Or stroking one's chin or smoking a pipe? In a lot of cases it does
    seem to... or at least it indicates a person is considering the matter, but may
    need more time to think before deciding how to respond.

    Maybe the repetitive &/or ritualistic nature of such physical action
    calms the mind & is conducive to the state of relaxed attention in which people
    learn best. I understand walking tends to have similar effects.... :-)



    Do you know that some people created Fidonet clients
    for mobile phones and tablet computers.


    No, I didn't. Glad to hear it.... :-)



    IMHO the Fidonet style text messaging makes chats more
    intelligent.


    The Fidonet style is definitely more user-friendly AFAIC than any of
    its rivals. Although I have a cell phone I reserve it for family matters which
    require my immediate attention, and as you already know I do email only on rare
    occasions when I want to communicate privately with users from Russia.... :-))



    I wonder when will they invent an e-book where I will
    be able to make remarks using a digital stylus pen? :)


    I called this enquiry to the attention of the computer techie across
    the room, and I see he's answered already.... ;-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)