• some

    From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to All on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, all!

    Football between Colombia and the Netherlands -- the meeting between
    dealers and customers.

    What is the difference between journalists and flies? Flies also love jam.

    Many people think naively that have never tested dog meat.


    Bye, all!
    Alexander Koryagin

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    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to alexander koryagin on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    Greetings alexander!

    Football between Colombia and the Netherlands

    is better known as Socker; Columbia wins by a whisp of smoke.

    -- the meeting between dealers and customers

    takes place on the socker field.

    What is the difference between journalists and flies?

    Journalists spread crap on walls (and certain brides) and flies use it for lipstick!

    Flies also love jam

    like journalists love to spred crap on the walls.

    Many people think naively that have never tested dog meat.

    Most of them havn't tasted it either.


    Have a day!

    R\%/itt - K5RXT

    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.99
    * Origin: South-Texas Area Hub - Gulf Coast Backbone (1:387/22)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Roy Witt on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Roy Witt!
    I read your message from 09.07.2014 17:45 ak>> Football between Colombia
    and the Netherlands
    RW> is better known as Socker; Columbia wins by a whisp of smoke.

    BTW, what a strange word "socker." Foot+ball is so clear and can be
    divided by English football, American football, beach football,
    minifootball, criketball.

    ak>> -- the meeting between dealers and customers
    RW> takes place on the socker field.

    ak>> What is the difference between journalists and flies?
    RW> Journalists spread crap on walls (and certain brides) and flies use
    RW> it for lipstick!
    ak>> Flies also love jam
    RW> like journalists love to spred crap on the walls.

    why on walls? They write for newspapers or TV?

    ak>> Many people think naively that have never tested dog meat.
    RW> Most of them havn't tasted it either.

    It is a joke about cheap snack bars' production. ;)

    Bye, Roy!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2014
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to alexander koryagin on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    Greetings alexander!

    is better known as Socker; Columbia wins by a whisp of smoke.

    BTW, what a strange word "socker." Foot+ball is so clear and can be divided by English football, American football, beach football, minifootball, criketball.

    The sport is known as Socker in America. Basically because that
    nomenclature distinguishes it from American Football, which isn't the same sport.

    -- the meeting between dealers and customers
    takes place on the socker field.

    What is the difference between journalists and flies?
    Journalists spread crap on walls (and certain brides) and flies use
    it for lipstick!
    Flies also love jam
    like journalists love to spred crap on the walls.

    why on walls? They write for newspapers or TV?

    The word 'crap' describe what it is that they write, whether or not it's
    on the wall is irrelevant. A true journalist would report the news as it
    really happened, but not American journalists. American journalists would rather write about fiction than non-fiction.

    Many people think naively that have never tested dog meat.
    Most of them havn't tasted it either.

    It is a joke about cheap snack bars' production. ;)

    Y'all have snack bars that serve dog meat in Russia?

    In any case, my comment was based on the word tested in your comment.

    Tasted: To distinguish the flavor of dog meat by taking into the mouth.

    The word tasted would fit that line better than tested.


    Have a day!

    R\%/itt - K5RXT

    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.99
    * Origin: South-Texas Area Hub - Gulf Coast Backbone (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Dallas Hinton on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    Greetings Dallas!

    Hi Roy -- on Jul 11 2014 at 10:06, you wrote:

    The sport is known as Socker in America. Basically because that

    Actually spelled "Soccer" :-)

    Right. Thanks for pointing that out; saves me from having to do so.

    Dunno how that name change came about.

    I changed it in my old brain. Didn't realize it until I saw the soccer
    news this morning...


    Have a day!

    R\%/itt - K5RXT

    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.99
    * Origin: South-Texas Area Hub - Gulf Coast Backbone (1:387/22)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Roy Witt on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@newmail.ru>

    Hi, Roy Witt!
    I read your message from 11.07.2014 10:06
    about some more.

    RW> The word tasted would fit that line better than tested.

    Tasted. To tell the truth, I wanted to put just this word.

    Bye, Roy!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2014
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Dallas Hinton on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@newmail.ru>

    Hi, Dallas Hinton!
    I read your message from 12.07.2014 13:57
    about some more.

    DH> Actually, I meant that I don't know why it's "soccer" in North
    DH> America and "football" everywhere (?) else!

    I know that in Croatia people don't use the word "football". Instead
    they call it "nogomet" - it sounds probably like "footthrowing" in
    English. I believe that in this way they fight against foreign words.

    Bye, Dallas!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2014
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Roy Witt on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Roy Witt!
    I read your message from 13.07.2014 13:20

    RW>>> The word tasted would fit that line better than tested.
    RW>
    ak>> Tasted. To tell the truth, I wanted to put just this word.
    RW>
    RW> Tasted or tested?

    "Tasted" of course. If I had pronounced it better, in my head, I would
    not probably make such an error. BTW, it is a very good idea to
    pronounce correctly all what you are writing or reading. As for me, if I
    have even a doubt about the pronunciation of the word which I am reading
    or writing I always take my dictionary.

    PS: "Taste" was a too known verb to make me take my dictionary. ;-)

    Bye, Roy!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2014
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Roy Witt on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Roy Witt!
    I read your message from 13.07.2014 13:21

    DH>>> Actually, I meant that I don't know why it's "soccer"
    DH>>> in North America and "football" everywhere (?) else!
    RW>
    ak>> I know that in Croatia people don't use the word
    ak>> "football". Instead they call it "nogomet" - it sounds
    ak>> probably like "footthrowing" in English. I believe that in
    ak>> this way they fight against foreign words.
    RW>
    RW> They should then use a word that would translate as
    RW> 'foot-kicking' - since ??the players do more of that than
    RW> 'throwing' the ball with their feet.
    RW> Better yet, make goal attempts using their heads the only way
    RW> to score and call the game 'head-kicking'...

    Even more amusing "nogomet" sounds for the Russian people. "Met" in
    Croatian and Russian means "to throw". For instance, "minomet" is a
    weapon -- a mine thrower (launcher). "Nogomet" can mean that you throw a
    foot (that was probably cut off).

    Bye, Roy!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2014
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Roy Witt on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Roy Witt!
    I read your message from 16.07.2014 11:55

    RW>>> Tasted or tested?

    <skipped>

    RW> www.freedictionary.com has a feature where you can hear the word
    RW> being spoken in English so that you can pronounce it correctly. It
    RW> also helps to say the word out-loud, so you can hear it being
    RW> spoken with a 'Russian' accent. 8^)

    I will try immitate the American accent. ;-)

    ak>> PS: "Taste" was a too known verb to make me take my dictionary.

    RW> Read:
    RW> PS: "Taste" is a very well known verb, enough so to make me consult
    RW> my dictionary for spelling and meaning.


    IMHO, your variant doesn't reflect that I meant the event from the past. Actually, I tried to explain why I didn't take my dictionary.

    Bye, Roy!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2014
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