• Some funny stuff

    From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to All on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, All!

    Yesterday, a Polish customs station was paralyzed by a Russian truck
    loaded with matreshka dolls.

    "Daddy, do you believe in hosts?"
    "No, son, they don't exist."
    "But the housemaid said they exist."
    "Oh! Pack your things, and we're leaving in a jiffy!"
    "Why?"
    "We haven't any housemaids."

    It's difficult to search for Bin Laden in Afghanistan. Especially if he
    is not there. (A new Chinese wisdom from Alex Ko :))

    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
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  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to mark lewis on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, mark lewis!
    I read your message from 23.09.2013 11:20

    ak>> Yesterday, a Polish customs station was paralyzed by a
    ak>> Russian truck loaded with matreshka dolls.
    ml>
    ml> one needs to know what matreshka dolls are for this one to make
    ml> sense and be funny...

    Do you think that there are many people who don't know what a matreshka
    doll is? IMHO, it is as well-known as vodka. ;-)

    ak>> "Daddy, do you believe in hosts?"
    ak>> "No, son, they don't exist."
    ak>> "But the housemaid said they exist."
    ak>> "Oh! Pack your things, and we're leaving in a jiffy!"
    ak>> "Why?"
    ak>> "We haven't any housemaids."
    ml>
    ml> ??this one is good :)
    ml>
    ak>> It's difficult to search for Bin Laden in Afghanistan.
    ak>> Especially if he is not there. (A new Chinese wisdom from
    ak>> Alex Ko :))
    ml>
    ml> ??the use of "search for" in this one is not right... one can
    ml> always and easily search for something where it may or may not
    ml> be... instead "find" should be used...
    ml>
    ml> It's difficult to find Bin Laden in Afghanistan. Especially
    ml> if he is not there.

    Yes, probably it sounds clearer.
    Although, for speaking practice, I can note that if we derive this
    phrase from the original one (about a cat and a dark room) we can find
    out that it is indeed a difficult task to search for anything in the
    complete darkness. So we have two difficulties:

    1. Searching in the darkness (for something) is a difficult business.
    2. It is an especially difficult business if the something we a looking
    for is absent in the dark room, where we are searching.

    Translating it for Afghanistan we can note, that searching in Afghan
    mountains is a very difficult business itself. And it is a especially difficult business if the subject of searching is not there.

    Bye, mark!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
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  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to mark lewis on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, mark lewis!
    I read your message from 24.09.2013 11:52

    ak>>> Yesterday, a Polish customs station was paralyzed by a Russian
    ak>>> truck loaded with matreshka dolls.
    ml>
    ml>> one needs to know what matreshka dolls are for this one to make
    ml>> sense and be funny...

    ak>> Do you think that there are many people who don't know what a
    ak>> matreshka doll is? IMHO, it is as well-known as vodka. ;-)

    ML> i think, without looking it up, that they are those dolls within
    ML> dolls...

    And there are record breakers. ;-)

    <skipped>
    ak>>> It's difficult to search for Bin Laden in Afghanistan. Especially
    ak>>> if he is not there. (A new Chinese wisdom from Alex Ko :))
    ml>> ?? the use of "search for" in this one is not right... one can
    ml>> always and easily search for something where it may or may not
    ml>> be... instead "find" should be used... It's difficult to find Bin
    ml>> Laden in Afghanistan. Especially if he is not there.

    ak>> Yes, probably it sounds clearer. Although, for speaking practice,
    ak>> I can note that if we derive this phrase from the original one
    ak>> (about a cat and a dark room) we can find out that it is indeed a
    ak>> difficult task to search for anything in the complete darkness. So
    ak>> we have two difficulties:

    ML> hahaha... actually, there in the darkness, it is easy to search ;)
    ML> O:)

    It isn't there! ;)

    ak>> 1. Searching in the darkness (for something) is a difficult
    ak>> business.
    ML> i have to wonder what a blind person would say about that ;)

    Can he say something more different than me? In the darkness we will
    both search by groping. Well, I will probably turn on a flashlight. ;=)
    The main problem I will have is the possibility of searching in one
    place many times. Well, I can mark my path with chalk, writing
    everywhere that Alex Ko was there. When a sapper checked mines in a mine-strewn field he does something like that.

    ak>> 2. It is an especially difficult business if the something we a
    ak>> looking for is absent in the dark room, where we are searching.
    ML> absolutely true when it comes to finding the object of the search
    ML> :)

    _Finding_ is an optional part of any searching process. ;) You can
    easily find your object if you stumble against it.

    <skipped>
    ML> is possible that both mean the same thing in the original language
    ML> or there was simply no concept of one or the other and the
    ML> translators simply took the most direct translation instead of
    ML> working with the context...

    Yeah, there are many ways to cook the cat. ;)

    Bye, mark!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
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  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Ardith Hinton on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 24.09.2013 16:32

    ak>> Yesterday, a Polish customs station was paralyzed by a Russian
    ak>> truck loaded with matreshka dolls.

    ml>> one needs to know what matreshka dolls are

    AH> ... usually spelled "matryoshka" or "matrioshka" in Canada. I have
    AH> also seen it spelled "matrushka". While it appears to be spelled
    AH> with an "e" in Russian, their vowel sounds differ from ours at
    AH> times.... :-)

    Actually, must be "matryoshka."

    AH> I had to think about it for a moment... but our daughter has such a
    AH> doll. AFAIC they're classic wooden toys of the sort which can still
    AH> be found here in Vancouver if you know where to look. They're quite
    AH> readily available in Alaska, especially in shops frequented by
    AH> tourists. I suppose there could be folks in other parts of North
    AH> America who have never heard of them.

    Well, there're no anecdotes understandable for everyone. Although,
    IMHO every nation has something that symbolize it, and it is usually
    known for everybody who is watching TV channels that show the world. In
    Russia -- matryoshka, vodka, balalaika (musical instrument). Ukraine has
    salo (salty pork fat), hopak (a crazy, national dance), horilka (vodka
    with cayenne). The US has football, baseball, turkey. Canada has
    grizzlies. ;=)

    AH> Okay, so you take the doll apart in the middle & find another doll.
    AH> You repeat the same exercise any number of times, depending on how
    AH> large a bit of tree trunk the wood carver started with & how much
    AH> you can afford to spend. Now imagine what reaction this might get
    AH> at an international border... and how a bunch of grownups might be
    AH> taking these dolls apart in order to establish to their own
    AH> satisfaction that there is absolutely nothing hidden inside them
    AH> except other dolls. As one who has travelled to the USA, I can
    AH> certainly relate... [BEG].

    Yes, some drugs can be put inside a small doll. Besides,
    disassembling, in this case, implies assembling thereafter. ;)

    AH> JFTR, I'm not criticizing border guards from other countries. When
    AH> we were flying from Whitehorse to Vancouver, a month or two prior
    AH> to 9/11, we encountered a young man at the airport who insisted on
    AH> examining my own & our daughter's deodorant bottles in detail...
    AH> while an older co-worker looked on. Although he'd been introduced
    AH> to us earlier in our hostess's house it was his duty to ensure we
    AH> weren't trying to smuggle bear spray... which is illegal in
    AH> Vancouver... and the size & shape of the containers was roughly
    AH> similar. :-)

    Why do people smuggle bear spray? Can it be drunk? ;)

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
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