• Re: Ha-ha again(2)

    From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Paul Quinn on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Paul Quinn!
    I read your message from 09.09.2013 20:15

    Give me a dirty-faced woman any time. :)
    Normally, women cover their faces and lips with paint, pomade etc.
    Without them women are not so bright and shining. So, if your wife
    stands up earlier in the morning to bring you a cap of coffee, you
    know that the coffee is just an excuse. She just needs time to paint
    herself all over, so you would recognize her, when awoken. ;=)

    As a matter of fact, it is 'the look' from the night before that is
    most frightening at times. All that facial cream & hair curlers.
    ;-)

    That is why almost all woman pop-stars have paranoia that when they are
    bathing they are secretly watched and photographed as they are in reality.

    Well, when I listen to an English speaker, I need to record him so
    I were able afterward to listen to him five times more and be sure
    that I had been correct when I answered OK, during our talk. ;=)

    Oh, yes. So do I, particularly during TV programs. In our case we
    have a pay-TV recorder box, with a facility for a rewind & replay function, and, a 'Closed Captions' option to turn on a text display
    window of the words spoken (if available for the program).

    However, I did not have that crutch when I used to work with an ex-
    West Yorkshireman who spoke some kind of pidgin Yorkshire/English/Scottish. Luckily he spoke Australian English
    moderately well, as well. :)

    BTW, the main villain from the "Fifth element", IMHO, spoke Australian
    English. I'll try to retell that passage:

    "This caase is empty!?
    Empty -- the opposite full.
    This caase is supposed to be full!!!
    Anyone care to explaain?
    Look at my fingers: four stones -- four craates. Zero stones -- zero craates!!!"

    Bye, Paul!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Ardith Hinton on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 17.09.2013 23:46

    Men and women are so different that even when they wash their
    faces they have different results. Men will look better.

    So when her Significant Other realizes what she looks like, without
    her War Paint, it's All Over? I thought that went out in the
    1960's.... ;-)


    Give me a dirty-faced woman any time. :)
    As either Erma Bombeck or Peg Bracken... both USAian writers,
    BTW... has commented, many people are more attracted to female
    hands which look as if they've been doing something interesting
    than to the soft & unscarred hands in TV ads.

    As would have said Freud "doing this, men remember their childhood
    when boys looked at mothers's hands in searching for something to eat." Pigeons, cats, dogs look at their feeders in a similar way. ;-)

    By the same token, I don't object to the sweat of honest toil when
    it is fresh enough not to remind me of "Eau de Locker Room". If
    only some of our male friends recognized that they needn't shower &
    shave & drown themselves in cheap cologne immediately prior to
    visiting with us... [wry grin].

    That cologne has been checked through centuries! Probably, it is like valerian drops and cats. ;)

    If you want soup making to be less boring laugh ominously every
    time when you add any ingredient.

    I would call it "soup-making", though I cannot explain why.
    (Ardith could, I'm sure.)

    <skipped>
    Anyway, here are the examples I've come up with thus far:
    1) standard two-word combinations (in North America, anyway):
    soup kitchen, soup spoon

    A soup kitchen? What is it? I always thought that a kitchen is a room
    to prepare any food.

    (??? ... that a kitchen is THE room... which article is more correct?)

    2) two words (from a wooden box which originally contained
    Bronnley English Lemons & which is now about forty years old):
    BY APPOINTMENT
    TO H M THE QUEEN
    TOILET SOAP MAKERS

    Both Pears & Carr's of Carlisle, OTOH... in more recent
    packaging... describe themselves as "xxx manufacturers", which more clearly requires two words.

    3) one word, no hyphen... confirmed by two dictionaries of
    Canadian English and apparently consistent with US English:

    dressmaker, dressmaking
    haymaker, haymaking
    metalworker, metalworking; woodworker, woodworking

    4) mixed results:

    merry-maker/merrymaker
    holiday-maker/holidaymaker/holiday maker

    In both cases the hyphen seems to be more popular among Brits & ex-
    Brits of a certain age... but these words are not commonly used in
    North America.

    IMHO, we can say that English doesn't prohibit us from a new words
    invention. When we say "soup making," without hyphen, and we mean that
    "soup" is an adjective and therefore two separate words are correct.
    But when we make "soup-making" we mean a single word. I believe that a dictionary can tell us if "soup-making" exists in nature. If it is in a dictionary, it looks like a green light. From another side, if English
    can make the adjective "soup" from the noun "soup" it probably means
    that we can make a new word from the words "soup" and "making" either. ;)

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Ardith Hinton on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    Brer Ardith Hinton wrote to Brer Paul Quinn about Ha-ha again(2):

    In both cases the hyphen seems to be more popular among Brits &
    ex-Brits of a certain age... but these words are not commonly used in North America.

    5) hyphenated word regarded by the authors of my OXFORD CANADIAN DICTIONARY as North American & Australian slang:

    widow-maker.

    No doubt you'll excuse me while I ROFL here! Bottom line is, I won't quibble about how others choose to spell words which can't easily be looked up. :-))

    The reality is that a hyphen between two words (two adjectives?) modifys
    the noun that comes after them. i.e. a widow-maker, the B-26 Marauder a
    WW2 twin-engine medium bomber - etc.. ^-modifier^ ^-----noun--^
    ^modifier-^ ^noun^

    OTH, if the same words came after the noun; i.e. The B-26 Maruader was a
    WW2 twin-engine medium bomber, nick-named the widow maker - etc.
    ^modifier-^ ^noun^ ^modifier^ ^noun^

    Which only goes to prove that you can slip this kind of stuff into any
    sentence in any which way that you please, as most native English speakers won't know the difference. 8^)


    R\%/itt



    --- Ya have ta ask yourself: What Would Roy Witt Do?
    * Origin: Lone-Star BBS - San Antonio, Texas - USA (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Ardith Hinton on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    Brer Ardith Hinton wrote to Brer Roy Witt about Ha-ha again(2):

    Hi, Roy! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    Brer Ardith Hinton wrote to Brer Paul Quinn

    ^^^^ ^^^^

    I see you've changed your spelling of this word, whether
    by accident or by design... so I thought a bit of clarification might
    be in order.

    It was by design and from my early days in Fidonet. It is taken from a
    West African story about Br'er Rabbit and his friends, Br'er Fox, Br'er
    Bear and a Tar Baby, narrated by a black slave named Uncle Remus in a
    Disney Classic called "Song Of The South". You can find an illustrated
    history of the origins of the story here:

    http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Br%27er+Rabbit

    Essentially it's a dialectical variation & contraction of "brother". The apostrophe is used, as it is in other contractions, to indicate where there has been an omission of one or more letters:

    brother --> br[oth]er --> br'er

    True.

    Many people do spell it without the apostrophe nowadays
    though.
    :-)

    Yeup.

    hyphenated word regarded by the authors of my OXFORD
    CANADIAN DICTIONARY as North American & Australian slang:

    widow-maker.


    I noticed the same spelling in MERRIAM-WEBSTER ONLINE just
    now, BTW.

    Widowmaker is defined as: Widow maker or widowmaker is a somewhat
    facetious term used for something that is considered to present a lethal
    hazard to, predominantly, men, and thus, by taking their lives, may make
    their wives become widows.

    in the online dictionary that I use, TheFreeDictionary.com

    It has more than a dictionary and thesaurus, it also includes a Medical
    Legal and Financial dictionary, including Acronyms, Idioms and an Encyclopedia...

    If you look up widow-maker, you're referred to the origin and history of
    Pecos Pete and his horse, Widow-Maker. Which is an interesting piece if
    there ever was one.

    Pecos Pete's; "His horse, Widow-Maker (also called Lightning), was so
    named because no other man could ride him and live."


    The reality is that a hyphen between two words (two
    adjectives?) modifys the noun that comes after them.


    Sometimes we use hyphenated words as modifiers regardless
    of whether or not the components are listed in the dictionary as adjectives. You've shown us how terms like "widow-maker" and
    "twin-engine" can be used that way. But we can do it with other
    parts of speech too. I've seen things like "oft-wed movie actress
    Gloria Glamorpuss" used in Hollywood journalese over the years....
    :-)

    8^) I wouldn't know about that, as I don't read such, errr, journals.

    OTH, if the same words came after the noun; i.e. The
    B-26 Maruader was a WW2 twin-engine medium bomber,
    nick-named the widow maker -

    There's another example of the above... "B-26".

    Living across the border from Seattle, you should know that 'B-26' is a
    model designator for a bomber airplane made by The Boeing Company during
    WW2. The B indicates 'Bomber' and the number 26 is the model number. i.e.
    A B-29 dropped Little Boy (Atomic Bomb) over Hiroshima, Japan on August 6, 1945.

    But IMHO a nickname may be a different matter. Once it has achieved
    the status of a Proper Noun it could conceivably retain the same
    spelling for a long time. If whoever came up with the name used two
    words that's how it's spelled AFAIC.

    OK.

    I've met kids with given names which suggest their parents didn't
    know the standard spellings, and who are stuck with what's recorded
    on their birth certificate until they're old enough to have it
    legally changed.

    I would have preferred to grow up using the variation of my middle name,
    rather than Roy. Those were confusing times as my father and grandfather
    both had the same name that they gave me. My mother, who wanted to differentiate between us, called me Jackie or Jack, while my dad was
    referred to as Junior, leaving my grandfather with the distinction of
    using Roy.

    Other folks may have surnames they continue to spell the same way
    their ancestors did four hundred years ago, although they leave out
    half the syllables when they say them aloud.

    Some even distort the name to their preference. Bret Favre (Green Bay
    Packers) does this by pronouncing the 'r' before the 'v'...I call it as I
    see it and pronounce it as favor...i.e. we're not in France.

    How would you pronounce "Worcestershire sauce"? IIRC you omit two syllables, while I omit one.... ;-)

    I call it 'Steak Sauce!' because it's a whole lot better than A-1...

    Which only goes to prove that you can slip this kind
    of stuff into any sentence in any which way that you
    please, as most native English speakers won't know
    the difference. 8^)

    Uh-huh. When I checked the Internet +/- 7,530,000 entries appeared. I'm sure you'll forgive me for not reading all of them...
    but in terms of sheer numbers "widowmaker" (one word) seems to come
    out ahead. It's the name e.g. of a weapon, a cocktail lounge, a rock
    band or something of the sort, a movie, and a series of books.
    They're in the first forty entries here & our modem buddies overseas
    may be grateful they see fewer ads for such things! Apart from that
    I found only one example similar to
    yours: a doctor describes a specific variety of arterial blockage &
    calls it the widow maker (two words)... a patient writes about his widow-maker heart attack. In general, however, I'm inclined to agree
    with your assessment of the signal-to-noise ratio in the common
    parlance. :-))

    That's a fact too. Some people get stuck in a rut and even when it is
    pointed out to them that what they're saying is incorrect, they continue
    to 'have it their way'... i.e. your, you're comes to mind.


    R\%/itt - K5RXT

    Reminder: "On Friday September 8th 2006, Mike Godwin's 16 year experiment
    was concluded and Godwin's Law was officially repealed by a MAJORITY vote
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    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
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    * Origin: Lone-Star BBS - San Antonio, Texas - USA (1:387/22)