• Can you write it?

    From alexander koryagin@3:640/384 to All on Mon Oct 2 17:31:08 2017
    Hi All!

    This is a short mp3 audio file. Logically I understand it, but can you write it exactly, as it is? It was from the latest BBC click program about how to prolong life of the mobile phone battery.

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B4vhI2LJjxi5ZnNEdmF4Q1RFVkk


    PS: In Russia we say that some people have ears that were stepped by bears. :)

    Bye all!
    Alexander
    english_tutor

    --- Paul's Win98SE VirtualBox
    * Origin: Quinn's Post - Maryborough, Queensland, OZ (3:640/384)
  • From Paul Quinn@3:640/1384 to alexander koryagin on Mon Oct 2 19:23:26 2017
    Hi! alexander,

    On 02 Oct 17 17:31, you wrote to All:

    This is a short mp3 audio file. Logically I understand it, but can
    you write it exactly, as it is? It was from the latest BBC click
    program about how to prolong life of the mobile phone battery.

    Yes, so did I. On the second time through I was concentrating on significant bits of information stated in the message, and not listening to the message very much; in short, hunting for keywords related to the subject.

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B4vhI2LJjxi5ZnNEdmF4Q1RFVkk

    The audio sample wouldn't play for me but it offered a download option, which I
    accepted. Played on auto-repeat for a few minutes, I got: "if you plug in your phone when you go to bed and it's charged up over a couple of hours, that time at 100% charge overnight will significantly accelerate the degradation of the battery".

    PS: In Russia we say that some people have ears that were stepped by bears. :)

    If that means it takes a while getting used to a person's pronounciation peculiarities then that was particularly so with that audio, given the horrible
    English accent. Yuck. :)

    Cheers,
    Paul.

    ... In memory of a hero: Zoya Kosmodemyanskaya, 29 Nov 1941.
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20110213
    * Origin: Quinn's Rock - Live from Paul's Xubuntu desktop! (3:640/1384)
  • From Nil Alexandrov@1:16/101 to alexander koryagin on Mon Oct 2 12:21:06 2017
    Hello, alexander!

    Monday October 02 2017 17:31, from alexander koryagin -> All, in URL @OFGHIUrl:

    Can you write it?

    What you are probably asking for is to transcript the utterance.

    This is a short mp3 audio file. Logically I understand it, but can
    you write it exactly, as it is? It was from the latest BBC click
    program about how to prolong life of the mobile phone battery. https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B4vhI2LJjxi5ZnNEdmF4Q1RFVkk

    The transcript would be like "If you plugin it when you get beds, and it charges after a couple of hours, that time at the 100% charge overnight will significantly accelerate the degradation of the battery."

    PS: In Russia we say that some people have ears that were stepped by bears. :)

    Have Van Gogh's ear for music?
    The equivalent to that Russia expression would be "to be tone-deaf".

    Best Regards, Nil
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5
    * Origin: DE KC1GSH 73! (1:16/101)
  • From Nil Alexandrov@1:16/101 to alexander koryagin on Mon Oct 2 12:41:32 2017
    Hello, alexander!

    Monday October 02 2017 12:21, from Nil Alexandrov -> alexander koryagin

    Can you write it?
    What you are probably asking for is to transcript the utterance.

    My bad, I meant to transcribe here.

    Best Regards, Nil
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5
    * Origin: DE KC1GSH 73! (1:16/101)
  • From alexander koryagin@3:640/384 to Paul Quinn on Tue Oct 3 18:13:37 2017
    Hi, Paul Quinn!
    I read your message from 02.10.2017 12:23
    about Can you write it?.

    The audio sample wouldn't play for me but it offered a download
    option, which I accepted. Played on auto-repeat for a few minutes,
    I got:

    "if you plug in your phone when you go to bed and it's charged up
    over a couple of hours, that time at 100% charge overnight will significantly accelerate the degradation of the battery".

    I also employed a cool mp3 player. My version is slightly different:

    "If you plug your phone when you get to beds -- I mean charge after a couple of
    hours that time at a 100% charge overnights will significantly accelerate the degradation of the battery."


    PS: IMHO a mobile battery switches itself off when it gets 100%. So, the statement of this guy is dubious. Probably he said his own opinion.


    Bye, Paul!
    Alexander Koryagin
    ENGLISH_TUTOR 2017

    --- Paul's Win98SE VirtualBox
    * Origin: Quinn's Post - Maryborough, Queensland, OZ (3:640/384)
  • From alexander koryagin@3:640/384 to Nil Alexandrov on Tue Oct 3 18:26:19 2017
    Hi, Nil Alexandrov!
    I read your message from 02.10.2017 19:21
    about Can you write it?.

    Can you write it?

    What you are probably asking for is to transcript the utterance.

    Do you think "write" is unclear for the Englishmen? "Transcribe" is somewhat a scientific word, IMHO. :)

    This is a short mp3 audio file. Logically I understand it, but can
    you write it exactly, as it is? It was from the latest BBC click
    program about how to prolong life of the mobile phone battery.
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B4vhI2LJjxi5ZnNEdmF4Q1RFVkk

    The transcript would be like "If you plugin it when you get beds, and it charges after a couple of hours, that time at the 100% charge overnight will significantly accelerate the degradation of the battery."

    I also spent a half an hour listening it. :) I sent my third version in the previous message.


    PS: In Russia we say that some people have ears that were stepped by
    bears. :)

    Have Van Gogh's ear for music?
    The equivalent to that Russia expression would be "to be tone-deaf".

    IMHO, pure Russian phrases are more interesting for the foreigners. After all this idiom is very clear, and a person understands easily that a person has a poor musical ear if it was stepped by a heavy bear.

    Bye, Nil!
    Alexander Koryagin
    ENGLISH_TUTOR 2017

    --- Paul's Win98SE VirtualBox
    * Origin: Quinn's Post - Maryborough, Queensland, OZ (3:640/384)
  • From Nil Alexandrov@1:16/101 to alexander koryagin on Tue Oct 3 13:55:08 2017
    Hello, alexander!

    Tuesday October 03 2017 18:26, from alexander koryagin -> Nil Alexandrov:

    Can you write it?
    Do you think "write" is unclear for the Englishmen? "Transcribe" is somewhat a scientific word, IMHO. :)

    "Can you write it down, please?" -- Would sound more naturally and less scientific, although people nowadays are pretty well familiar with the tech like CC (closed caption) and subtitles everywhere on TV.

    I also spent a half an hour listening it. :) I sent my third version
    in the previous message.

    "If you plug your phone .." -- cannot hear "phone" here.
    ".. I mean charge after -- cannot hear "mean".

    IMHO, pure Russian phrases are more interesting for the foreigners.
    After all this idiom is very clear, and a person understands easily
    that a person has a poor musical ear if it was stepped by a heavy
    bear.

    In this context (of Russia and bears), you just support the cliche - bears, vodka, balalaika :-)

    Best Regards, Nil
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5
    * Origin: DE KC1GSH 73! (1:16/101)
  • From alexander koryagin@3:640/384 to Nil Alexandrov on Wed Oct 4 17:19:10 2017
    Hi, Nil Alexandrov!
    I read your message from 03.10.2017 20:55
    about Can you write it?.

    Can you write it?
    Do you think "write" is unclear for the Englishmen? "Transcribe"
    is somewhat a scientific word, IMHO. :)

    "Can you write it down, please?" -- Would sound more naturally and
    less scientific, although people nowadays are pretty well familiar
    with the tech like CC (closed caption) and subtitles everywhere on
    TV.

    As a Russian student could answer, "I am not a Down". ;-) But if seriously, it is an interesting question to the native speakers -- when it is necessary to add "up" and "down" to the verbs. Should it be done to add clearness to the verbs? Is "Can you write it?" not clear enough?

    I also spent a half an hour listening it. :) I sent my third
    version in the previous message.

    "If you plug your phone.." -- cannot hear "phone" here.

    Paul heard it too, BTW.

    ".. I mean charge after -- cannot hear "mean".

    Well... As I said I don't pretend...

    IMHO, pure Russian phrases are more interesting for the
    foreigners. After all this idiom is very clear, and a person
    understands easily that a person has a poor musical ear if it was
    stepped by a heavy bear.

    In this context (of Russia and bears), you just support the
    cliche - bears, vodka, balalaika :-)

    In Australia they have kangaroos, in Russia we have bears. Why should we be shy
    of it? The idiom about the ears trodden by a bear, sounds funny and IMHO is more clear than "Van Gogh's ear", for instance.

    Bye, Nil!
    Alexander Koryagin
    ENGLISH_TUTOR 2017

    --- Paul's Win98SE VirtualBox
    * Origin: Quinn's Post - Maryborough, Queensland, OZ (3:640/384)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to alexander koryagin on Tue Oct 17 17:02:33 2017
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to Nil Alexandrov:

    Do you think "write" is unclear for the Englishmen?
    "Transcribe" is somewhat a scientific word, IMHO. :)


    It seems to me that "transcribe" is more precise if you want others to reproduce in writing exactly what they heard (or thought they did). If you are willing to let others make a few editorial changes in order to clarify the garbled instructions you heard (or thought you did) "write" allows for that.

    While I was still working on the current reply I also reviewed some other traffic in the echo & caught myself saying that as a police officer Paul would have been expected to "write down" who-what-when-where-why-how data in a logical & coherent manner... not to copy every word other folks may have said. I'd do much the same as a waitress taking your order for food & drink.... :-)



    it is an interesting question to the native speakers --
    when it is necessary to add "up" and "down" to the verbs.


    It would be more usual to say "write down" in this context. But if you got what you wanted I must conclude it's not strictly necessary... [grin].



    Should it be done to add clearness to the verbs?


    Heh. There's where I have difficulty with a certain "rule" many of the native speakers in E_T are familiar with... "Never use a long word where a short one will do." The shorter, more common words are not necessarily easier to understand. They often have several meanings. The verbs also tend to have irregular inflections &/or to be followed by other short words which look like adverbs or prepositions but don't appear to serve any useful purpose. In some cases I think they may have at one time. Why do we "hang up" the phone, e.g.? It doesn't make sense to me if one is using a desk phone or a cell phone & has to reach downward in order to accomplish the task. It makes sense when I cast my mind back to the wall-mounted phones some of my elderly relatives who lived in farmhouses of about the same vintage used years ago. I haven't seen such a thing in actual use since I was a child, but the language hasn't caught up.

    In a similar vein, university instructors may be called "lecturers" ... from the Latin verb "to read"... regardless of their subject area or their teaching style. The name = their rank, not their job description. Before the invention of the printing press the Great Man often sat on a podium & read his notes to the neophytes who were seated at a lower level. As a waitress, OTOH, I'd usually be standing while my customers were sitting... meaning I'd already be looking downward to see their faces before I wrote down their orders. :-))



    IMHO, pure Russian phrases are more interesting for
    the foreigners. After all this idiom is very clear,
    and a person understands easily that a person has a
    poor musical ear if it was stepped by a heavy bear.
    |I'd say "stepped on", but I almost missed that... ;-)

    In this context (of Russia and bears), you just support
    the cliche - bears, vodka, balalaika :-)

    In Australia they have kangaroos, in Russia we have bears.
    Why should we be shy of it?
    |IMHO "shy about" is more clear in this context.


    Why indeed. We also have bears in Canada & the US... some of which live within a half hour's drive of where I do. The stories I could tell about bears from around these parts take up a lot more bandwidth in my mind than the clich‚s I've encountered about bears from SomePlace Else. At any rate, idioms from other languages are fascinating AFAIC & I understood what you meant. :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From alexander koryagin@3:640/384 to Ardith Hinton on Wed Oct 18 23:43:07 2017
    Hi, Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 17.10.2017 10:02
    about Can you write it?.

    <skipped>>
    .. from the Latin verb "to read"... regardless of their subject
    area or their teaching style. The name = their rank, not their job description. Before the invention of the printing press the Great
    Man often sat on a podium & read his notes to the neophytes who
    were seated at a lower level. As a waitress, OTOH, I'd usually be
    standing while my customers were sitting... meaning I'd already be
    looking downward to see their faces before I wrote down their
    orders. :-))

    Thank you for your lecture and corrections.

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    ENGLISH_TUTOR 2017

    --- Paul's Win98SE VirtualBox
    * Origin: Quinn's Post - Maryborough, Queensland, OZ (3:640/384)