• show goes on

    From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to All on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>


    Hi, all!


    Yesterday, at 9pm, without declaring a war, my neighbors bought a piano.

    Daddy, I've got two question for you. Can I have more pocket money and
    why not?

    A snowwoman which is made by a boy acquires more and more details with
    every year passing.


    Bye, all!
    Alexander Koryagin

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  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to alexander koryagin on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    alexander koryagin wrote to All:

    Yesterday, at 9pm, without declaring a war, my neighbors bought a
    piano.

    Yeah, and? Other than perhaps the comma after Yesterday, I see no problem
    with this sentence. Keep in mind that a comma seperates or pauses a
    thought, as you have done with Yesterday (pause) at 9pm (pause) without declaring a war (pause) my neighbors bought a piano (stop)

    Comma = pause
    Period = stop

    Daddy, I've got two question for you. Can I have more pocket money
    and why not?

    Ahhh...an opportunistic child. Get both questions in before the old man
    can think about why not...

    A snowwoman which is made by a boy acquires more and more details
    with every year passing.

    A boy who soon becomes a young man and the details are more pronounced as
    his mind instructs his physical being to add the minutest details as if
    the snowwoman were a real woman.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.92
    * Origin: Lone-Star BBS - San Antonio, Texas - USA (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Alexander Koryagin on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    22 Aug 13 20:43, Paul Quinn wrote to Alexander Koryagin:

    Paul Quinn wrote to Alexander Koryagin:

    The sentence would still make sense if you drop the first comma.
    I.e. to read, "Yesterday at 9pm, without...". By the way, we spell
    our neighbours with the extra "u" here. 'Neighbors' is a North
    American, and possibly Canadian, variation from the normal.

    Being too long in the outback makes learning modern English too impossible
    to keep up with the times and so, the variation of the spelling is due to
    a lack of growing with the language. Modern English dropped the
    added and useless 'u' spelling way back in the early 1800s...


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.92
    * Origin: Lone-Star BBS - San Antonio, Texas - USA (1:387/22)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Paul Quinn on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Paul Quinn!
    I read your message from 22.08.2013 20:43

    Yesterday, at 9pm, without declaring a war, my neighbors bought a
    piano.

    The sentence would still make sense if you drop the first comma. I.
    e. to read, "Yesterday at 9pm, without...".

    In one punctuation manual I read on this account the following rule:
    if a part of the sentence can be removed and the sentence meaning to be
    the same, you should separate such a part with commas. Let's check it
    and throw out "at 9 pm":

    [Yesterday, without declaring a war, my neighbors bought a piano.] No
    damage for the humor.

    Should we put a comma after yesterday? Let's try to remove it.

    [Without declaring a war, my neighbors bought a piano.]

    There is still a humorous point. "Yesterday" is not essential and
    should be separated by a comma.

    Now we check the comma after "without declaring a war". Actually my
    error is here! I put a comma after that words but I can't remove them!

    [Yesterday, at 9 pm, my neighbors bought a piano.]

    The sentence has lost its sense of humor! The comma was put wrongly.
    So the final version (IMHO of course) is:

    [Yesterday, at 9pm, without declaring a war my neighbors bought a
    piano.]

    Well, let's wait for Ardith's comment. ;)

    PS: But the final rule in that manual was the following: "if you feel
    that in your sentence there are too many commas, throw out some of them. Abundance of commas cause more harm than help and hamper reading." ;-)

    By the way, we spell our neighbours with the extra "u" here.
    'Neighbors' is a North American, and possibly Canadian, variation
    from the normal.

    I know it - my choice was deliberate. In school I studied British
    English, but when I and Everette checked my translation he was very
    unhappy with my British spelling. And I decided to write as an American.
    ;-) Actually I can't please everyone on this account.

    Daddy, I've got two question for you. Can I have more pocket money
    and why not?
    That's two _questions_. :)

    I am a poor corrector. And I still pretend that I can manage without glasses. ;-)

    A snowwoman which is made by a boy acquires more and more details
    with every year passing.
    What's a "snowwoman"? ;-) We nearly had ice on the ground here this morning, when the temperature dropped to about 1deg Celsius.

    Well, it is like a snowman, but female. ;) She is made of snow, you
    are right. But it demands a lot of snow and a carrot (for the nose). ;)

    Isn't this normal for any snow figure? The number of acquisitions
    would naturally increase if the debris from each spring's melt
    isn't removed for other uses, prior to the following
    autumn(fall)/winter rebuild.

    That acquisitions in the snowwoman's body were not made from debris
    that accumulated every year. With every year passing the boy paid more
    and more attention to those details he didn't notice when he was
    younger.

    PS: In short, his last version was with breasts. ;=)

    Bye, Paul!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
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    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to mark lewis on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@newmail.ru>

    Hi, mark lewis!
    I read your message from 23.08.2013 12:18
    about show goes on.

    my error is here! I put a comma after that words but I can't
    remove them!

    [Yesterday, at 9 pm, my neighbors bought a piano.]

    The sentence has lost its sense of humor! The comma was put
    wrongly. So the final version (IMHO of course) is:

    [Yesterday, at 9pm, without declaring a war my neighbors bought a
    piano.]

    you should flip it around if you are not going to use the comma...
    here it is stripped to its essence...

    [My neighbors bought a piano without declaring a war.] or
    full-blooded
    [Yesterday, at 9pm, my neighbors bought a piano without declaring a
    war.]

    IMHO, the essential part of the humorous sense of this story is
    taking the listener aback. So, the story in my interpretation begins as
    an official statement about the war beginning which is broadcasting on
    the radio. The first part of the sentence should be spoken with a
    serious, official tone of voice, like was spoken this:

    "Today, at 3 hour in the morning, without declaring a war, Fascist
    Germany attacked our country." (this is a real citation of the USSR
    announcer, when he annonced the war in June 22, 1941).

    (BTW, here the words "without declaring a war" are not essential, and
    I put a comma after them - separating the elements of the list).

    So, actually, this story is a parody, and the the funny side of the situation is becoming visible after we tell of the piano buying. IMHO we
    should hide the words about the piano until the last moment, making the listener intrigued as much as possible.

    Bye, mark!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
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  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Paul Quinn on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@newmail.ru>

    Hi, Paul Quinn!
    I read your message from 24.08.2013 08:11
    about Re: show goes on.

    <skipped>
    Daddy, I've got two question for you. Can I have more pocket
    money and why not?
    That's two _questions_. :)

    I am a poor corrector. And I still pretend that I can manage
    without glasses. ;-)

    You shouldn't. There is no shame in using spectacles, and they can
    impart an aura of intelligence at a first-time meeting with
    strangers.

    Actually, I had worn grasses until 2000. I had strong
    nearsightedness, and I decided to have a laser correction. For ten years
    I enjoyed with perfect sight, but a couple years ago I found it was
    difficult to read text. I bought spectacles, but I use them when I read
    very small text only. I believe that nearsightedness probably can be
    cured if you read often and strain your eyes. Wearing grasses when
    reading is like a giving up.

    Well, it is like a snowman, but female. ;) She is made of snow,
    you are right. But it demands a lot of snow and a carrot (for the
    nose). ;)

    Of course; I knew this. It's just that we don't usually see any
    evidence of frozen water here, even in the coldest winters.

    Yes, but as for me the most beautiful season of mine is when snow
    melt in spring. There are a lot of pools and thawed earth smells
    marvellous. Well, if you stay outside of the town with its dog lovers.
    ;=)

    Bye, Paul!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Paul Quinn on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Paul Quinn!
    I read your message from 25.08.2013 07:58

    Actually, I had worn grasses until 2000. I had strong

    O my foot! ;-))

    Yikes! What have you been smoking? :)

    It was not a misspell, I just mixed the words up.
    Such things can happen when an English learner watches TV too much, and
    his mind became blurred, as after a real shot. ;-) As far as I remember,
    that day I watched Formula 1, which flattens the convolutions of my
    brain like an iron, and then I aggravated the situation by some American
    movie. ;-) No FIDONET allowed after such things.

    It works as intended if one views the world through the persona
    of a (deceased) English comedian, Benny Hill. His caricatures
    of asians' inability to ??tongue-twist the 'l' sound,
    substituting the 'r' sound instead, made for a lot of aural
    humour in his comedy skits.

    I saw his comics, but as far as I remember they were comedies of action, without words.

    Bye, Paul!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
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  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Paul Quinn on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Paul Quinn!
    I read your message from 26.08.2013 16:17

    It works as intended if one views the world through the
    persona of a (deceased) English comedian, Benny Hill.
    His caricatures of asians' inability to ??tongue-twist
    the 'l' sound, substituting the 'r' sound instead, made
    for a lot of aural humour in his comedy skits.

    I saw his comics, but as far as I remember they were
    comedies of action, without words.

    I just went to my aunty YouTube (uncle is Google) and typed in
    "benny hill", and the search engine suggested "benny hill
    chinese guy" in the list as I was ??typing. After I clicked on
    that suggestion, the first link/video offered was...

    (Mr Chow Mein auditions as a Ventriloquist:) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cy88Sxxce_4

    I rest my case. :) Enjoy.

    Yes, indeed, that "little ferrow" speaks there. ;) In Russia we haven't
    seen this episode, probably because it is untranslatable.

    Bye, Paul!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
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