• some stuff

    From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to All on Wed Jun 27 08:51:00 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, all!

    A car driver knocked down a pedestrian at a pedestrian crossing.
    The driver to the pedestrian: "Oh, you are lucky today! I am a doctor!"
    The pedestrian: "But you a not lucky. I am a lawyer."

    The most reliable shelters against Russia's nuclear rockets are under
    American banks.

    If you want your guests to be off, ask them for money. If you want them
    to stay, ask for advice.

    Bye, all!
    Alexander Koryagin
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to alexander koryagin on Wed Jun 27 11:10:02 2018
    alexander koryagin wrote to All:

    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, all!

    A car driver knocked down a pedestrian at a pedestrian crossing.
    The driver to the pedestrian: "Oh, you are lucky today! I am a
    doctor!" The pedestrian: "But you a not lucky. I am a lawyer."

    A car driver knocked down a pedestrian in a pedestrian crosswalk.

    The driver said to the pedestrian: "Oh, you are lucky today! I am a
    doctor!"

    The pedestrian replied: "But you are not so lucky. I am a lawyer."

    The most reliable shelters against Russia's nuclear rockets are under American banks.

    The most reliable shelter against Russian nuclear bombs are in the vaults
    of Georgian banks. Russian rockets would be intercepted and destroyed by American satellites using rocket killer lasers from space.

    If you want your guests to be off, ask them for money. If you want
    them to stay, ask for advice.

    If you want your guests to leave, ask them for money. If you want them to
    stay, ask them for advice.

    Bye, all!

    Goodbye everybody

    Alexander Koryagin

    Alex


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.92
    * Origin: Lone-Star BBS - San Antonio, Texas - USA (1:387/22)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Roy Witt on Thu Jun 28 12:53:14 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Roy Witt!
    I read your message from 27.06.2013 11:10

    A car driver knocked down a pedestrian at a pedestrian crossing.
    The driver to the pedestrian: "Oh, you are lucky today! I am a
    doctor!" The pedestrian: "But you a not lucky. I am a lawyer."

    A car driver knocked down a pedestrian in a pedestrian crosswalk.

    BTW, I am often confused about prepositions "at" and "in" in cases when
    I tell about crosswalks and squares. For instance, I understand, that a
    street is something long and it is not a place, is not a point. So I use
    "in", for example:

    There is a man in the street.

    But what if I tell about a point, a place, where something has happened?
    Can I use "at"? IMHO it is quite logical, especially when I tell about
    the place:

    "Where is John?" "He is at the market" "Where is his monument?" "It is
    at Trafalgar Square."


    <skipped>
    The most reliable shelters against Russia's nuclear rockets are
    under American banks.
    The most reliable shelter against Russian nuclear bombs are in the
    vaults of Georgian banks.

    Where are they? In Georgia, the Caucasus? 8-}

    Russian rockets would be intercepted and destroyed by American
    satellites using rocket killer lasers from space.

    Can we have in Russia laser killers for the American satellites? ;)

    If you want your guests to be off, ask them for money. If you want
    them to stay, ask for advice.

    If you want your guests to leave, ask them for money. If you want
    them to stay, ask them for advice.

    I wonder, maybe "be off" is more rude, and therefore is more apt when it applied to annoying guests? ;)


    Bye, Roy!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to alexander koryagin on Thu Jun 28 09:29:26 2018
    alexander koryagin wrote to Roy Witt:

    A car driver knocked down a pedestrian at a pedestrian crossing.
    The driver to the pedestrian: "Oh, you are lucky today! I am a
    doctor!" The pedestrian: "But you a not lucky. I am a lawyer."

    A car driver knocked down a pedestrian in a pedestrian crosswalk.

    BTW, I am often confused about prepositions "at" and "in" in cases
    when I tell about crosswalks and squares. For instance, I understand,
    that a street is something long and it is not a place, is not a
    point. So I use "in", for example:

    There is a man in the street.

    This would be correct for someone who is actually in the street. There is
    also a correct way to say 'the man on the street' as a general term as a
    news reporter doing remote radio or TV broadcasting.

    In the above example, a pedestrian crosswalk is in the street and a
    pedestrian should be in the crosswalk.

    But what if I tell about a point, a place, where something has
    happened? Can I use "at"? IMHO it is quite logical, especially when I
    tell about the place:

    "Where is John?" "He is at the market" "Where is his monument?" "It
    is at Trafalgar Square."

    Quite correct. However, he can also be in the market, shopping. You could
    also get more specific with: 'It is at Trafalgar Square, next to George Washington's statue.'

    <skipped>

    The most reliable shelters against Russia's nuclear rockets are
    under American banks.
    The most reliable shelter against Russian nuclear bombs are in the
    vaults of Georgian banks.

    Where are they? In Georgia, the Caucasus? 8-}

    Where are the banks in Georgia? I have no idea as I've never been there.
    The above was just an example of your statement. American banks do have underground vaults, but many bank vaults are above ground in such places
    that have no basements.

    Russian rockets would be intercepted and destroyed by American
    satellites using rocket killer lasers from space.

    Can we have in Russia laser killers for the American satellites? ;)

    Probably...just as America has spy satelites looking in your bathroom
    window. 8^)

    If you want your guests to be off, ask them for money. If you want
    them to stay, ask for advice.

    If you want your guests to leave, ask them for money. If you want
    them to stay, ask them for advice.

    I wonder, maybe "be off" is more rude, and therefore is more apt when
    it applied to annoying guests? ;)

    No, I think 'be off' is a British way of saying 'leave' in American
    English.

    You should be aware that all English dialects are not the same. American, Australian, British, Canadian and Hong Kong English are just a few of
    them. All are spoken and written with differences only a native English
    speaker can detect and understand, Even then, some of it has to be
    explained to us. Sometimes, I have to have a New England American citizen repeat themselves because their speach is too often not understood in
    Texas, or the rest of the country for that matter.

    For instance the use of 'mate' in British, Australian and perhaps Canadian means 'friend' in American English. The little English that I've heard
    spoken in Hong Kong has been over Chinese news casts by satelite TV and
    they speak English there the same as the CNN or FOX news channels here in America. You would think that they, being a former British colony, would
    speak English with a British accent, but they do not.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.92
    * Origin: Lone-Star BBS - San Antonio, Texas - USA (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to alexander koryagin on Mon Jul 2 10:50:20 2018
    alexander koryagin wrote to Roy Witt:

    "There is a man in the street."

    This would be correct for someone who is actually in the street.
    There is also a correct way to say 'the man on the street' as a
    general term as a news reporter doing remote radio or TV
    broadcasting.

    I read in a dictionary that it is an American variant. The British
    say "in the street."

    I forget who it was or which morning TV program it was, but they featured
    'the man on the street' way back in the 1960s...he interviewed the people
    on the street on a daily basis. They were actually on the sidewalk,
    outside the TV studio where the show was being broadcast.

    In the above example, a pedestrian crosswalk is in the street and a
    pedestrian should be in the crosswalk.

    But what if I tell about a point, a place, where something has
    happened? Can I use "at"? IMHO it is quite logical, especially
    when I tell about the place:

    "Where is John?" "He is at the market" "Where is his monument?"
    "It is at Trafalgar Square."

    Quite correct. However, he can also be in the market, shopping. You
    could also get more specific with: 'It is at Trafalgar Square, next
    to George Washington's statue.'

    But look at the example at http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/square_2

    "She lives in Hanover Square."

    Can she live AT Hanover Square?

    Yes, she can live at 12 Hanover Square, which would be more specific than saying she lives in Hanover Square.

    The most reliable shelters against Russia's nuclear rockets are
    under American banks.
    The most reliable shelter against Russian nuclear bombs are in
    the vaults of Georgian banks.

    Where are they? In Georgia, the Caucasus? 8-}

    Where are the banks in Georgia? I have no idea as I've never been
    there. The above was just an example of your statement. American
    banks do have underground vaults, but many bank vaults are above
    ground in such places that have no basements.

    When I said that the American banks are the most safe place in
    case of Russian attack I just meant a humorous statement that those thieves in Russia, who rule the country, keep their booty and buy
    property somewhere in the US. So, if Russia bombs the US there will
    be some places they spare. ;)

    Now see, I wouldn't have known that unless I was a Russian insider like
    you are.

    Russian rockets would be intercepted and destroyed by American
    satellites using rocket killer lasers from space.
    Can we have in Russia laser killers for the American satellites?
    ;)

    Probably... just as America has spy satelites looking in your
    bathroom window. 8^)

    As Snowden would said "look who's talking!" ;-)

    Apparently he's a smart guy, but he's not very smart! Know what I mean?
    8^)

    Iceland has offered him a welcome there and there's no extradition treaty between them and the USA. In Iceland he'd be able to walk the streets
    without fear of being picked up and extradited. Now he just sits in a
    holding area while Putin thumbs his nose at Obama.

    More power to Snowden as far as I'm concerned.

    They say when he wants to swear at CIA he does it the Sheremetyevo bathroom holding the douche as a telephone handset. ;=)

    There are douche' bags in Russian bathrooms for men?

    If you want your guests to be off, ask them for money. If you
    want them to stay, ask for advice.
    If you want your guests to leave, ask them for money. If you want
    them to stay, ask them for advice.
    I wonder, maybe "be off" is more rude, and therefore is more apt
    when it applied to annoying guests? ;)

    No, I think 'be off' is a British way of saying 'leave' in American
    English.

    I need something nasty. Maybe this:

    "If you want your guests to buzz off ask them for money...." ;)

    How about: If you want your unwanted guests to flee the party, tell them
    one of the drunken party-goers pissed in the punch bowl. Those who have
    been drinking the punch will be out of there with a flash...

    You should be aware that all English dialects are not the same.
    American, Australian, British, Canadian and Hong Kong English are
    just a few of them. All are spoken and written with differences
    only a native English speaker can detect and understand, Even then,
    some of it has to be explained to us. Sometimes, I have to have a
    New England American citizen repeat themselves because their speach
    is too often not understood in Texas, or the rest of the country
    for that matter.

    I heard the same about dialects in the UK. They say that some Englishmen don't understand each other even in the UK. They have
    different meanings, different pronunciations.

    I would believe that. I once worked alongside a Scottsman who I couldn't understand a single thing he said. He used to get mad when I asked him to repeat himself, slowly. Then I'd ask him again, even if I got it on the
    2nd go around.

    For instance the use of 'mate' in British, Australian and perhaps
    Canadian means 'friend' in American English. The little English
    that I've heard spoken in Hong Kong has been over Chinese news
    casts by satelite TV and they speak English there the same as the
    CNN or FOX news channels here in America. You would think that
    they, being a former British colony, would speak English with a
    British accent, but they do not.

    I sometimes watch their satellite channels CCTV9 and CNC World
    English. They try to have native speakers there. But when I hear
    native Chinese speaking English they IMHO have a notable, specific
    accent.

    I too watch CCTV9 and the English spoken on that channel is the same
    English spoken on American news channels like CNN, FOX, etc.. Which, btw,
    is the same English that I speak, so it is very understandable to me and I
    do not detect any accent. Except for the occasional British way of using
    or pronouncing a word.



    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.92
    * Origin: Lone-Star BBS - San Antonio, Texas - USA (1:387/22)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Roy Witt on Wed Jul 4 09:22:30 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Roy Witt!
    I read your message from 02.07.2013 10:50

    "There is a man in the street."

    This would be correct for someone who is actually in the street.
    There is also a correct way to say 'the man on the street' as a
    general term as a news reporter doing remote radio or TV
    broadcasting.

    I read in a dictionary that it is an American variant. The British
    say "in the street."

    I forget who it was or which morning TV program it was, but they
    featured 'the man on the street' way back in the 1960s... he
    interviewed the people on the street on a daily basis. They were
    actually on the sidewalk, outside the TV studio where the show was
    being broadcast.

    As for me, I like "on the street." I think that when the Americans modernized their English they understood that, in this case, the
    preposition "on" is much logical than British "in." Although, the
    tradition means much. For instance, IMO it is funny, that birds in
    America are still IN the tree, not ON the tree, although it would be
    quite logical. Even more logical than "on the street." ;-)

    In Russia, our birds are ON trees, but mice are IN holes. Bark
    beetles live IN trees.

    <skipped>
    But look at the example at
    http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/square_2
    "She lives in Hanover Square." Can she live AT Hanover Square?

    Yes, she can live at 12 Hanover Square, which would be more
    specific than saying she lives in Hanover Square.

    Do you mean that I can't use "at" without mentioning her house
    number? I repeat the question: Can she live AT Hanover Square? Is it a legitimate question?

    <skipped>
    Russian rockets would be intercepted and destroyed by American
    satellites using rocket killer lasers from space.
    Can we have in Russia laser killers for the American satellites?
    ;)

    Probably... just as America has spy satelites looking in your
    bathroom window. 8^)
    As Snowden would said "look who's talking!" ;-)
    Apparently he's a smart guy, but he's not very smart! Know what I
    mean? 8^)

    Well, as any person he can be smart in a specific area, but be naive
    in some others. I think, he had hoped that he would stay in Hong-Kong.
    It has some autonomy from China, but it is not a communist country. From another side China provides the defense and controls Hong-Kong's foreign policy. Snowden could not be extradited without Chinese consent.
    Theoretically, Chinese Communist government must not allow Hong-Kong to extradite Snowen to the US. They are not friends, speaking mildly. He
    could hope on that, and that was the point that he revealed his secrets
    there, and open some information that the US spies widely in the Chinese cyberspace.

    Hong-Kong's authority appeared to be between two fires. As a Chinese territory it could not extradite Showden, but as a close the US' partner
    it could not grant him an asylum.

    Iceland has offered him a welcome there and there's no extradition
    treaty between them and the USA. In Iceland he'd be able to walk
    the streets without fear of being picked up and extradited. Now he
    just sits in a holding area while Putin thumbs his nose at Obama.

    In Russia, theoretically, Snowden would have the same freedom of
    movement. He is not the first spy nail between the US and Russia. There
    are many KGB traitors who have caused great damage to Russia when they
    sold top secrets to CIA, and they were given an asylum in the US. The
    situation looks similar -- Russia has been wanting to suit them as
    criminals, but the US is not in the mood to extradite them. So, for
    Russia, Showden could be just a small revenge.

    As for Putin's words, that "Snowden could stay in Russia on condition
    that he stops to cause damage to the US" -- all politicians are liars
    and hypocrites. IMHO, it was just a formal statement, and after that
    Putin's spokesman had said that Snowden would no be extradited in any
    case (because there is a death penalty in the US).

    They say when he wants to swear at CIA he does it the Sheremetyevo
    bathroom holding the douche as a telephone handset. ;=)

    There are douche' bags in Russian bathrooms for men?

    No, it is just a joking description of the late stage of insanity
    when a person thinks he is been listened everywhere. ;=) Modern pop
    stars have another syndrome -- they thought they are shot even they are photographed even in their bathrooms. But they bothers not about their nakedness, but about their face to be look good on the photos. So they
    smile in their bathrooms. ;)

    If you want your guests to be off, ask them for money. If you
    want them to stay, ask for advice.
    If you want your guests to leave, ask them for money. If you
    want them to stay, ask them for advice.
    I wonder, maybe "be off" is more rude, and therefore is more apt
    when it applied to annoying guests? ;)
    No, I think 'be off' is a British way of saying 'leave' in
    American English.
    I need something nasty. Maybe this: "If you want your guests to
    buzz off ask them for money...." ;)

    How about: If you want your unwanted guests to flee the party, tell
    them one of the drunken party-goers pissed in the punch bowl. Those
    who have been drinking the punch will be out of there with a
    flash...

    Well, as a rule guests are not unwanted. We say about our guests that
    stay very late, without thinking that the good time to leave had passed
    long ago. I remember as Winnie-the-Pooh was Rabbit's guest and got into
    a tight place. But all the Rabbit should have done was to ask the bear
    for some honey. ;-)

    Bye, Roy!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From Aleksej Serdjukov@2:5020/1042.42 to alexander koryagin on Wed Jul 4 23:57:00 2018
    Hello alexander.

    04 Jul 13 09:22, you wrote to Roy Witt:

    Hong-Kong. It has some autonomy from China, but it is not a communist country. From another side China provides the defense and controls

    *On the other hand

    <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/on_the_other_hand>

    They say when he wants to swear at CIA he does it the
    Sheremetyevo bathroom holding the douche as a telephone handset.
    ;=)
    There are douche' bags in Russian bathrooms for men?

    You probably mean "shower head": <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shower#Shower_head>.

    A douche is something else: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douche>.


    Aleksej

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5--b20110320
    * Origin: (2:5020/1042.42)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to alexander koryagin on Thu Jul 5 09:36:34 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi!
    I read your message from 04.07.2013 09:22

    That was an awful paragraph I've ever written for years, probably I
    forgot to check it. ;=):

    No, it is just a joking description of the late stage of insanity
    when a person thinks he is been listened everywhere. ;=) Modern pop
    stars have another syndrome -- they thought they are shot even they
    are photographed even in their bathrooms. But they bothers not
    about their nakedness, but about their face to be look good on the
    photos. So they smile in their bathrooms. ;)

    must be:

    No, it is just a joking description of the late stage of insanity
    when a person thinks he has been listened everywhere. ;=) Modern pop
    stars have another syndrome -- they think they are photographed even in
    their bathrooms. But they don't bother about their nakedness, they
    bother how good their faces look on the photos. So they smile in their bathrooms. ;)

    Bye, alexander!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Aleksej Serdjukov on Thu Jul 5 10:07:40 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Aleksej Serdjukov!
    I read your message from 04.07.2013 23:57

    They say when he wants to swear at CIA he does it
    the Sheremetyevo bathroom holding the douche as a
    telephone handset. ;=)
    There are douche' bags in Russian bathrooms for men?

    You probably mean "shower head": ??<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shower#Shower_head>.

    probably "shower head" is correct -- it is very difficult to find the
    correct word knowing the Russian meaning only. ;)

    I meant this, that looks like a telephone handset: http://img.diytrade.com/cdimg/877704/8241196/0/1236753088/Shower_Head.jpg

    A douche is something else:
    <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douche>.

    It is a really tricky word. When I looked in Collins dictionary it said
    to me:

    douche [] 1) a stream of water or air directed onto the body surface or
    into a body cavity, for cleansing or medical purposes 2) the application
    of such a stream of water or air 3) an instrument, such as a special
    syringe, for applying a douche 4) to cleanse or treat or be cleansed or
    treated by means of a douche

    My goodness, I always thought that "directed onto the body surface" and
    "into a body cavity" is not the same. So, be careful when douching! ;=))

    Bye, Aleksej!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to alexander koryagin on Thu Jul 5 09:23:28 2018
    alexander koryagin wrote to Roy Witt:

    "There is a man in the street."

    This would be correct for someone who is actually in the street.
    There is also a correct way to say 'the man on the street' as a
    general term as a news reporter doing remote radio or TV
    broadcasting.

    I read in a dictionary that it is an American variant. The British
    say "in the street."

    I forget who it was or which morning TV program it was, but they
    featured 'the man on the street' way back in the 1960s... he
    interviewed the people on the street on a daily basis. They were
    actually on the sidewalk, outside the TV studio where the show was
    being broadcast.

    As for me, I like "on the street." I think that when the Americans modernized their English they understood that, in this case, the preposition "on" is much logical than British "in." Although, the tradition means much. For instance, IMO it is funny, that birds in
    America are still IN the tree, not ON the tree, although it would be
    quite logical. Even more logical than "on the street." ;-)

    When I go out to the field and do some bird hunting, the birds are usually
    in the trees, sitting on a limb. When I come along, self preservation
    moves them to spread their wings and leave the trees, landing on the
    ground. These birds are what we call Quail. They have a tendency to run
    rather than fly to escape the hunter...and they usually run up hill and
    fly down hill. Which frustrates a hunter even more than he already is.

    In Russia, our birds are ON trees, but mice are IN holes. Bark
    beetles live IN trees.

    Gophers live underground in their nests.

    But look at the example at
    http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/square_2
    "She lives in Hanover Square." Can she live AT Hanover Square?

    Yes, she can live at 12 Hanover Square, which would be more
    specific than saying she lives in Hanover Square.

    Do you mean that I can't use "at" without mentioning her house
    number?

    Not at all. She lives on (or at) Hanover Square in (or at) #12...

    I repeat the question: Can she live AT Hanover Square? Is it
    a legitimate question?

    Generally speaking, she can live at someplace.

    <skipped>

    Russian rockets would be intercepted and destroyed by American
    satellites using rocket killer lasers from space.
    Can we have in Russia laser killers for the American satellites?
    ;)

    Probably... just as America has spy satelites looking in your
    bathroom window. 8^)
    As Snowden would said "look who's talking!" ;-)
    Apparently he's a smart guy, but he's not very smart! Know what I
    mean? 8^)

    Well, as any person he can be smart in a specific area, but be
    naive in some others. I think, he had hoped that he would stay in Hong-Kong. It has some autonomy from China, but it is not a communist country. From another side China provides the defense and controls Hong-Kong's foreign policy. Snowden could not be extradited without Chinese consent. Theoretically, Chinese Communist government must not allow Hong-Kong to extradite Snowen to the US. They are not friends, speaking mildly. He could hope on that, and that was the point that
    he revealed his secrets there, and open some information that the US
    spies widely in the Chinese cyberspace.

    And vice versa...

    Hong-Kong's authority appeared to be between two fires. As a
    Chinese territory it could not extradite Showden, but as a close the
    US' partner it could not grant him an asylum.

    We call that situation as 'being between a rock and a hard place'.

    Iceland has offered him a welcome there and there's no extradition
    treaty between them and the USA. In Iceland he'd be able to walk
    the streets without fear of being picked up and extradited. Now he
    just sits in a holding area while Putin thumbs his nose at Obama.

    In Russia, theoretically, Snowden would have the same freedom of movement.

    That Snowden is in a holding area, having been there for longer than it
    should take to move on, says that he's now a political pawn. However,
    Putin can't give him asylum because of the relationship between Russia and
    the USA...right now we have a stalemate.

    He is not the first spy nail between the US and Russia.

    That's right.

    There are many KGB traitors who have caused great damage to Russia
    when they sold top secrets to CIA, and they were given an asylum in
    the US.

    Perhaps they were disgruntled spys with a bone to pick with the KGB...

    The situation looks similar -- Russia has been wanting to
    suit them as criminals, but the US is not in the mood to extradite
    them. So, for Russia, Showden could be just a small revenge.

    We've been there before. Most, if not all, former KGB agents re-patriated
    to Russian seem to have disappeared.

    As for Putin's words, that "Snowden could stay in Russia on
    condition that he stops to cause damage to the US" -- all politicians
    are liars and hypocrites. IMHO, it was just a formal statement, and
    after that Putin's spokesman had said that Snowden would no be
    extradited in any case (because there is a death penalty in the US).

    Snowden's own publically spoken words convicted him before he was charged
    with any crimes. This is what I meant when I said he was a smart man, but
    not a very smart man.

    They say when he wants to swear at CIA he does it the Sheremetyevo
    bathroom holding the douche as a telephone handset. ;=)

    There are douche' bags in Russian bathrooms for men?

    No, it is just a joking description of the late stage of insanity
    when a person thinks he is been listened everywhere. ;=) Modern pop
    stars have another syndrome -- they thought they are shot even they
    are photographed even in their bathrooms. But they bothers not about
    their nakedness, but about their face to be look good on the photos.
    So they smile in their bathrooms. ;)

    I would call that a 'skunk eating (feces)' grin...caught 'red handed' in
    an embarrasing situation, what else can you do?

    If you want your guests to be off, ask them for money. If you
    want them to stay, ask for advice.
    If you want your guests to leave, ask them for money. If you
    want them to stay, ask them for advice.
    I wonder, maybe "be off" is more rude, and therefore is more apt
    when it applied to annoying guests? ;)
    No, I think 'be off' is a British way of saying 'leave' in
    American English.
    I need something nasty. Maybe this: "If you want your guests to
    buzz off ask them for money...." ;)

    How about: If you want your unwanted guests to flee the party, tell
    them one of the drunken party-goers pissed in the punch bowl. Those
    who have been drinking the punch will be out of there with a
    flash...

    Well, as a rule guests are not unwanted. We say about our guests
    that stay very late, without thinking that the good time to leave had passed long ago. I remember as Winnie-the-Pooh was Rabbit's guest and
    got into a tight place. But all the Rabbit should have done was to
    ask the bear for some honey. ;-)

    I haven't read Winnie the Pooh, but having some kind of lubricant to help release someone caught in a tight place seems logical...


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.92
    * Origin: Lone-Star BBS - San Antonio, Texas - USA (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to alexander koryagin on Thu Jul 5 09:55:32 2018
    alexander koryagin wrote to Aleksej Serdjukov:

    They say when he wants to swear at CIA he does it
    the Sheremetyevo bathroom holding the douche as a
    telephone handset. ;=)
    There are douche' bags in Russian bathrooms for men?

    You probably mean "shower head":
    ??<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shower#Shower_head>.

    LOL!

    probably "shower head" is correct -- it is very difficult to find
    the correct word knowing the Russian meaning only. ;)

    I meant this, that looks like a telephone handset: http://img.diytrade.com/cdimg/877704/8241196/0/1236753088/Shower_Head
    .jpg

    A douche is something else:
    <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douche>.

    It is a really tricky word. When I looked in Collins dictionary it
    said to me:

    douche [] 1) a stream of water or air directed onto the body surface
    or into a body cavity, for cleansing or medical purposes 2) the application of such a stream of water or air 3) an instrument, such
    as a special syringe, for applying a douche 4) to cleanse or treat or
    be cleansed or treated by means of a douche

    This may help; Noun 1. douche - a small syringe with detachable
    nozzles douche - a small syringe with detachable
    nozzles; used for vaginal lavage and enemas

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/douche

    My goodness, I always thought that "directed onto the body surface"
    and "into a body cavity" is not the same. So, be careful when
    douching! ;=))

    Be even more careful when using the universal lavatory while flying on a commercial airplane. Never, ever push the ATR button.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.92
    * Origin: Lone-Star BBS - San Antonio, Texas - USA (1:387/22)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Roy Witt on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Roy Witt!
    I read your message from 05.07.2013 09:23

    Iceland has offered him a welcome there and there's no
    extradition treaty between them and the USA. In Iceland he'd be
    able to walk the streets without fear of being picked up and
    extradited. Now he just sits in a holding area while Putin thumbs
    his nose at Obama.

    In Russia, theoretically, Snowden would have the same freedom of
    movement.

    That Snowden is in a holding area, having been there for longer
    than it should take to move on, says that he's now a political
    pawn. However, Putin can't give him asylum because of the
    relationship between Russia and the USA... right now we have a
    stalemate.

    IMHO, some spy stories always happen between mighty powers. Just a
    year ago there was a big scandal when a Russian spying slumber network
    was betrayed by a stray KGB agent. May be you remember a smart Russian
    girl, Anna Chapman that was extradited to Russia during that scandal.
    Also I can remember an American guy jailed for spying for Israel. More
    of that - neither the US nor Russia cannot hinder Snowden's activity.
    His scandalous data is stored in a hidden place in the Internet, and he
    can open it at any moment if he feels himself in danger. Well it is
    blackmail, but Snowden has no other choice. His secrets are his the only weapon.

    <skipped>
    There are many KGB traitors who have caused great damage to Russia
    when they sold top secrets to CIA, and they were given asylum in
    the US.

    Perhaps they were disgruntled spys with a bone to pick with the
    KGB...

    "with a bone to pick with the KGB..." - what does it mean?

    The situation looks similar -- Russia has been wanting to suit
    them as criminals, but the US is not in the mood to extradite
    them. So, for Russia, Showden could be just a small revenge.
    We've been there before. Most, if not all, former KGB agents
    re-patriated to Russian seem to have disappeared.

    Neither Russia nor the US have never repatriated traitors. That would
    be a bad sign for future traitors, won't it? ;-)) Can you give me at
    least one example when Russian KGB traitor was repatriated to Russia and disappeared there?

    As for Putin's words, that "Snowden could stay in Russia on
    condition that he stops to cause damage to the US" -- all
    politicians are liars and hypocrites. IMHO, it was just a formal
    statement, and after that Putin's spokesman had said that Snowden
    would no be extradited in any case (because there is a death
    penalty in the US).

    Snowden's own publically spoken words convicted him before he was
    charged with any crimes. This is what I meant when I said he was a
    smart man, but not a very smart man.

    If he behaves himself correctly his secrets will guard him. And
    probably the US will understand that it is better to leave him alone. If Snowden has not opened another secrets so far he has no intention to do
    it. He needs to keep something for his own safety. KGB also cannot get
    access to them -- it cannot even interrogate him, because Snowen has
    constant contacts with his friends (from Wikileaks, for instance).

    <skipped>
    Well, as a rule guests are not unwanted. We say about our guests
    that stay very late, without thinking that the good time to leave
    had passed long ago. I remember as Winnie-the-Pooh was Rabbit's
    guest and got into a tight place. But all the Rabbit should have
    done was to ask the bear for some honey. ;-)

    I haven't read Winnie the Pooh, but having some kind of lubricant
    to help release someone caught in a tight place seems logical...

    It depends on how much honey the bear ate before trying to get out
    from Rabbit's house hole. ;-) It had eaten too much then.

    Bye, Roy!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Roy Witt on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, Roy Witt!
    I read your message from 05.07.2013 09:55

    My goodness, I always thought that "directed onto the body
    surface" and "into a body cavity" is not the same. So, be
    careful when douching! ;=))

    Be even more careful when using the universal lavatory while
    flying on a commercial airplane. Never, ever push the ATR
    button.

    Do they install it in men's room, too?! ;-)

    Bye, Roy!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to alexander koryagin on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    alexander koryagin wrote to Roy Witt:

    <skipped>

    There are many KGB traitors who have caused great damage to Russia
    when they sold top secrets to CIA, and they were given asylum in
    the US.

    Perhaps they were disgruntled spys with a bone to pick with the
    KGB...

    "with a bone to pick with the KGB..." - what does it mean?

    "a bone to pick" or "pick a bone" is an English cliche' meaning that there
    is a controversy or a dispute that needs to be negotiated.

    The situation looks similar -- Russia has been wanting to suit
    them as criminals, but the US is not in the mood to extradite
    them. So, for Russia, Showden could be just a small revenge.
    We've been there before. Most, if not all, former KGB agents
    re-patriated to Russian seem to have disappeared.

    Neither Russia nor the US have never repatriated traitors. That
    would be a bad sign for future traitors, won't it? ;-))

    I wasn't talking about traitorus spys, I was talking about spys that have
    been caught and held in prison, then repatriated back to their home
    country. Check into USSR history and you can find an American U2 spy plane incident where it was shot down over the USSR and the pilot kept in prison
    and charged with spying, then returned to the USA through negotiations
    which included a prisoner exchange.

    Can you give me at least one example when Russian KGB traitor was repatriated to Russia and disappeared there?

    See above. Whether the KGB agent returned to the USSR was a traitor or not would be the opinion of the politburo or the KGB. However, with that said,
    I doubt that any KGB agents returned from the USA to the USSR would have
    been returned if there was any chance that they would be considered to be traitors.

    As for Putin's words, that "Snowden could stay in Russia on
    condition that he stops to cause damage to the US" -- all
    politicians are liars and hypocrites. IMHO, it was just a formal
    statement, and after that Putin's spokesman had said that Snowden
    would no be extradited in any case (because there is a death
    penalty in the US).

    Snowden's own publically spoken words convicted him before he was
    charged with any crimes. This is what I meant when I said he was a
    smart man, but not a very smart man.

    If he behaves himself correctly his secrets will guard him. And probably the US will understand that it is better to leave him alone.

    He's tried to keep his information from being revealed, but that may not
    last, depending on who has that information now.

    If Snowden has not opened another secrets so far he has no intention
    to do it. He needs to keep something for his own safety. KGB also
    cannot get access to them -- it cannot even interrogate him, because Snowen has constant contacts with his friends (from Wikileaks, for instance).

    Yes...that helps him somewhat.

    <skipped>

    Well, as a rule guests are not unwanted. We say about our guests
    that stay very late, without thinking that the good time to leave
    had passed long ago. I remember as Winnie-the-Pooh was Rabbit's
    guest and got into a tight place. But all the Rabbit should have
    done was to ask the bear for some honey. ;-)

    I haven't read Winnie the Pooh, but having some kind of lubricant
    to help release someone caught in a tight place seems logical...

    It depends on how much honey the bear ate before trying to get out
    from Rabbit's house hole. ;-) It had eaten too much then.

    So his fat belly kept him from exiting the rabbit hole...I see...


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.92
    * Origin: Lone-Star BBS - San Antonio, Texas - USA (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to alexander koryagin on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    alexander koryagin wrote to Roy Witt:

    My goodness, I always thought that "directed onto the body
    surface" and "into a body cavity" is not the same. So, be
    careful when douching! ;=))

    Be even more careful when using the universal lavatory while
    flying on a commercial airplane. Never, ever push the ATR
    button.

    Do they install it in men's room, too?! ;-)

    Ummmm, I wasn't aware that there were seperate men/women's lavatories on airplanes. That shows you how long it has been since I last flew in a commercial jet. 8^) Suffice to say that if you're flying on such an
    aircraft that there wouldn't be any ATR buttons in the men's room.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.92
    * Origin: Lone-Star BBS - San Antonio, Texas - USA (1:387/22)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Roy Witt on Fri Jul 6 22:01:01 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@newmail.ru>

    Hi, Roy Witt!
    I read your message from 17.07.2013 11:36
    about some stuff.

    <skipped>
    Whether the KGB agent returned to the USSR was a traitor or not
    would be the opinion of the politburo or the KGB. However, with
    that said, I doubt that any KGB agents returned from the USA to the
    USSR would have been returned if there was any chance that they
    would be considered to be traitors.

    Naturally, when the USSR and the US made a captured spies exchange
    they didn't exchange traitors. They rescued only their valuable, staunch agents. Neither the USSR nor the US couldn't get back their traitors,
    because those people were valuable material for secret services.

    <skipped>
    If he behaves himself correctly his secrets will guard him. And
    probably the US will understand that it is better to leave him
    alone.

    He's tried to keep his information from being revealed, but that
    may not last, depending on who has that information now.

    This information is just a scandalous information which tells the
    world about methods of CIA and other similar organisations. Actually, it doesn't couse a technical damage. The US is trying to catch Snowden not
    because of his secrets, but because it wants to punish him. Punishment
    is the only reason. Snowden didn't deal with the US' secret agent
    network, he doesn't know American fixed-post spies across the world. All
    he knows is the CIA policy to create a great database in which every
    contact of every the US' citizen is fixed and stored. CIA knows all
    friends and partners of all Americans. It is rather humiliating, I agree
    with Snowden.

    Bye, Roy!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2013
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)