• Re: Some news from Harry

    From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to mark lewis on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, mark lewis!
    I read your message from 26.02.2014 14:58

    ak>> -----Beginning of the citation-----
    ak>> Harry followed his gaze up the carefully tended front
    ak>> path and felt his heart sink. The front door was hanging
    ak>> off its hinges. -----The end of the citation-----
    ml>
    ak>> Why sink -- not sank?
    ml>
    ml> his heart is currently sinking... it had not sank yet and it
    ml> was not already sunk... yes, it is a tense thing... it was
    ml> happening in the present...

    In the present? Then, IMHO, it must be "sinks".

    Bye, mark!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2014
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    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to alexander koryagin on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    Brer alexander koryagin wrote to Brer mark lewis about Re: Some news from Harry:

    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, mark lewis!
    I read your message from 26.02.2014 14:58

    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    Harry followed his gaze up the carefully tended front
    path and felt his heart sink. The front door was hanging
    off its hinges. -----The end of the citation-----

    Why sink -- not sank?

    his heart is currently sinking... it had not sank yet and it
    was not already sunk... yes, it is a tense thing... it was
    happening in the present...

    In the present? Then, IMHO, it must be "sinks".

    That would apply if he had more than one heart. 'Sinks' is plural...


    R\%/itt - K5RXT

    "It is the fault of our science that it wants to explain all, and
    if it explain not, then it says there is nothing to explain."
    Bram Stoker (1847-1912)

    Thus, we have "Climate Change Science" - which isn't capable of
    explaining anything.


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.98
    * Origin: South-Texas Area Hub - Gulf Coast Backbone (1:387/22)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Ardith Hinton on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@newmail.ru>

    Hi, Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 28.02.2014 23:32
    about Some news from Harry.

    ak>> -----Beginning of the citation-----
    ak>> Harry followed his gaze up the carefully tended
    ak>> front path and felt his heart sink. The front door
    ak>> was hanging off its hinges.
    ak>> -----The end of the citation-----
    AH>
    ak>> Why sink -- not sank?

    AH> I reckon "sink" is an infinitive in this context.
    AH> I'll post more examples later.... :-)

    I perused my book on English Grammar and indeed I read about some exotic
    form of the Infinitive. If I translate the Russian term back into
    English it would probably sound like "The objective case with the
    Infinitive".

    Example:
    He wanted him to come.

    If "the objective with the Infinitive" is used after the verbs of
    feelings we don't use "to".

    Examples:
    1. I saw her enter the house. (I saw she had entered the house).
    2. We noticed the captain appear on the bridge.
    3. They saw the plane fly over the houses.


    There is also "The objective with participle":

    I saw him running.
    I heard her shouting.

    The difference between these two cases is that the Participle expresses
    an act in action, but the Infinitive expresses a completed action.

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2014
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From Chris Jacobs@2:5020/400 to alexander koryagin on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    Sink is here indeed not a present. It is an infinitive.

    Chris

    "alexander koryagin -> mark lewis" schreef in bericht news:595$ENGLISH_TUTOR@JamNNTPd...

    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@erec.ru>

    Hi, mark lewis!
    I read your message from 26.02.2014 14:58

    ak>> -----Beginning of the citation-----
    ak>> Harry followed his gaze up the carefully tended front
    ak>> path and felt his heart sink. The front door was hanging
    ak>> off its hinges. -----The end of the citation-----
    ml>
    ak>> Why sink -- not sank?
    ml>
    ml> his heart is currently sinking... it had not sank yet and it
    ml> was not already sunk... yes, it is a tense thing... it was
    ml> happening in the present...

    In the present? Then, IMHO, it must be "sinks".

    Bye, mark!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2014
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)
  • From alexander koryagin@2:5020/400 to Ardith Hinton on Fri Jul 6 22:01:02 2018
    From: alexander koryagin <koryagin@newmail.ru>

    Hi, Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 19.03.2014 00:20
    about Some news from Harry.

    ak>> If "the objective with the Infinitive" is used after the verbs of
    ak>> feelings we don't use "to".

    ak>> Examples:

    ak>> 1. I saw her enter the house. (I saw she had entered the house).

    ak>> 2. We noticed the captain appear on the bridge.

    ak>> 3. They saw the plane fly over the houses.


    AH> Although I'm not sure what you mean by "verbs of feelings", I
    AH> avoided anything which could be interpeted as a linking verb (AKA a
    AH> copula verb) when I was trying *to come up with* some examples...
    AH> which I do intend *to share*. At any rate I agree that the
    AH> infinitive is often used without "to".... :-)

    It is not enough for a teacher to just agree. She ought to invent a
    rule. ;) And in this case the attempt to introduce "the verbs of
    feeling" is IMHO laudable. Indeed: to see, to watch, to observe, to
    notice, to hear, to feel -- they can be grouped. You perceive things
    using your organs of feeling.

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    fido7.english-tutor 2014
    --- ifmail v.2.15dev5.4
    * Origin: NPO RUSnet InterNetNews site (2:5020/400)