• Kin-dza-dza!

    From Denis Mosko@2:5064/54.1315 to All on Sat Oct 3 03:35:30 2020
    Kdd! is a 1986 Soviet sci-fi dystopian tragicomedy cult film released by the Mosfilm studio and directed by Georgiy Daneliya, with a story by Georgiy Daneliya and Revaz Gabriadze.

    Plot
    Kin-dza-dza! begins in 1980s Moscow. Vladimir Mashkov, aka Uncle Vova, a generic but gruff construction foreman is relaxing at home after a stressful day at work. His wife asks him to buy some groceries so Vova goes out to the nearest store. Standing right in the city centre on Kalinin Prospekt, a barefoot man dressed in a tattered coat appeals to anyone with a strange request: "Tell me the number of your planet in the tenture? Or least the number of your galaxy in the spiral?". Uncle Vova and a young Georgian student with a violin (The Violinist), stop and talk to the strange man. During a short conversation the stranger shows them a teleportation device - "traveler". Uncle Vova decides to test the veracity of the stranger's story and, despite the stranger's warnings, presses a random button on the device. Suddenly Uncle Vova and the Violinist find themselves transported to the planet "Pluke" in the "Kin-dza-dza" galaxy.

    The natives of the planet appear human, with deceptively primitive-looking technology and a barbaric culture, which satirically resembles that of humans. They are telepathic; the only spoken words normally used in their culture are "ku" (koo) and "kyu" (kyoo), the former stands for everything good, the latter being a swear word or stands for every bad thing. However, the Plukanians are able to quickly adapt to understand and speak Russian and Georgian. The society of Pluke is divided into two categories: Chatlanians and Patsaks. The difference is ascertained only by means of a small handheld device (visator), similar to flash drive in appearance; when pointed at a member of the Chatlanian group, an orange light on the device comes on; when pointed at a member of the Patsak group, a green light comes on. It is also noted that the social differences between Patsaks and Chatlanians are not constant: Pluke being a Chatlanian planet, so Chatlanians are privileged, and a system of rituals must be followed by the Patsaks to show flattery; but there are Patsak planets where Patsaks hold the upper hand and Chatlanians are subservient. The "visator" shows that Uncle Vova and the Violinist are Patsaks.

    The only group allowed to use weapons ("tranklucators") and enforce their will are the ecilops ("police" spelled backwards in Russian). Outside being a Patsak or Chatlanin, respect towards others is determined by the color of their pants; different shades require those of lower social standing to "ku" at them a predetermined number of times, displaying their submission. The nominal leader of the Plukanian society is Mr. P-Zh; everybody makes their best to display fervent worship to him and disrespect is severely punished; but, when encountered in person, P-Zh appears harmless and dumb. The fuel of Pluke is called luts and is made from water. All naturally present water has apparently been processed into luts, so drinking water is a valuable commodity (in fact, it can only be made from luts).

    A good deal of the plot is based on the fact that ordinary wooden matchsticks (ketse) (or, rather, the chemicals of the match head) are considered to be extremely valuable on Pluke. Uncle Vova and the Violinist meet two locals, Uef and Bi, who at various points either help or abandon the duo from Earth in their quest to return to Earth, which at various times involves repairing Uef and Bi's ship or raiding P-Zh's private compound.

    Uncle Vova and the Violinist finally encounter the man from the film's beginning, but he disappears, making it uncertain if he took them with him. The film then jumps back to the very beginning, as Uncle Vova heads outside however there is no man at the city center, where he runs into the Violinist, however they do not recognize each other. Suddenly, a passing tractor with an orange flashing light reminds them of the ecilops and they both reflexively squat and say, "ku!" as was required on Pluke. They immediately recognize each other. Uncle Vova, looking at the sky, hears the sound of a song performed by the Uef and Bi.

    Cast (in order of appearance)
    Stanislav Lyubshin as Vladimir Nikolayevitch Mashkov ("Uncle Vova")
    Galina Daneliya-Yurkova as Lucya, Mashkov's wife
    Levan Gabriadze as Gedevan Alexandrovitch Alexidze ("Fiddler")
    Anatoli Serenko as the Barefoot Wanderer from Uzm
    Yury Yakovlev as Bi the Patsak, a wandering singer
    Yevgeny Leonov as Uef the Chatlanian, a wandering singer
    Igor Khan as the one-handed smuggler
    Alexander Litovkin as the gang leader
    Valentin Bukin as black-moustached ecilop in an egg-shaped pepelats, demonstrating how a tranklucator works
    Irina Shmelyova as Tsan, the cart driver (tachanka-driving woman, a wandering singer and dancer)
    Lev Perfilov as Kyrr, the dissident Chatlanian with a tranklucator
    Nina Ruslanova as Galina Borisovna, the vice-dean
    Yuri Voronkov as bearded Chatlanian, leader of the "Children of the Sun" sect (later seen in the subway train, pretending to be a Patsak)
    Olesya Ivanova as cage-banging white sectarian woman
    Lyudmila Solodenko as sand-throwing black sectarian girl
    Vitali Leonov as Shorty (from the sect)
    Nikolai Garo as Mr P-Zh
    Igor Bogolyubov as Mr P-Zh's Personal Patsak
    Victor Marenkov as Patsak, wearing a coil pipe for a mask and working as watchman
    Aleksandr Gorbachyov as grey-moustached elderly ecilop in an egg-shaped pepelats, who will want "40 chatles" and "immediately press the kappa" in a scene later
    Yelena Mashkova-Sulakadze as watchman's wife (redheaded Patsak woman in the trapdoor)
    Gennady B.Ivanov as black ecilop, guarding the underground communications Aleksandra Dorokhina as colossal Chatlanian woman, working as attendant in the subway station
    Victor Makhmutov as the red-headed Chatlanian
    Vladimir Fyodorov as Mr Yellow Pants
    Yelena Antonova as Mr Yellow Pants' girlfriend
    Tatyana Novitskaya as an employee in the planetarium
    Yuri Naumtsev as the judge
    Gennady Yalovich as secret agent
    Veronica Izotova as the gang leader's female Chatlanian slave, wearing a collar Vladimir Razumovsky as ecilop with muzzles
    Nina Ter-Osipian as Mr P-Zh's noble mother
    Harri Schweitz as Mr P-Zh's 1st bodyguard (bearded fatman)
    Valentin Golubenko as Mr P-Zh's 2nd bodyguard (long-nosed powerman)
    Oleg Matveyev as Mr P-Zh's 3rd bodyguard (young man wearing gloves)
    Olga Mashnaya as Dekont (from the planet Alpha)
    Georgiy Daneliya as Abradox (from the planet Alpha)
    Varvara Vladimirova as young Alphian mother
    Anya Andriyanova as little blonde Alphian girl
    Plukanian language
    Koo - All words, with the following exceptions:
    Kyu (pronounced kyew) - any profanity
    Ketseh (pronounced "keh-tseh", emphasis on the second syllable) - matches (or, rather, the chemicals ordinarily used on Earth for match heads)
    Chatl - a currency unit
    Tsak - a small bell worn on the nose to indicate the low social status of the wearer
    Tentura and Antitentura - two opposite parts of the Universe. Some planets and galaxies exist in Tentura and some (including Earth) in Antitentura
    Pepelats - an interplanetary spacecraft (from the Georgian word "pepela" for butterfly)
    Tsapa - a component for different machines. A big tsapa is a very important component for the pepelats. A small tsapa is a component for the gravitsapa; without the small tsapa, a gravitsapa will not work. Tsapa is similar to a very rusty screwnut
    Gravitsapa - a component for the pepelats which allows intergalactic travel (from 'gravity' + 'tsapa')
    Tranklucator - a weapon
    Visator - compact device, detects difference between Patsaks and Chatlanians Kappa - a button or lever
    Luts - the fuel used by the pepelats, it is made of water
    Chatlanin - being with a high social status (detected as "orange" on a Visator) Patsak - being with a low social status (detected as "green" on a Visator) Ecilop - a policeman ("police" spoken backwards)
    Etsikh - a box for prisoners; also the imprisonment in such box (as a penalty); also the Etsikh is a jail with many such boxes ("Etsikh" is from the Georgian word "tsikhe" for prison, castle). Etsikh with nails is a hard punishment.
    Release
    The movie has been released on DVD in Russia but has gained virtually no notice elsewhere, with the exception of Japan.[citation needed] This is largely due to the fact that there was no official release of the movie with English subtitles for a long time. While the movie was in the making, a censorship threat emerged due to the use of the word Ku (Koo) which sounded like the initials "K. U." of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the USSR at the time, K. U. Chernenko. Chernenko who assumed the leadership in 1984, died in 1985, and this removed the danger.[citation needed]

    In 2005 RUSCICO (Russian Cinema Council) released a version with Russian original sound and with English and French dubbing, It has also subtitles in English and other languages.[1]

    Since 2013, a digitally-restored Blu-ray Disc version is available.[2]

    The film is available with English subtitles on YouTube via Mosfilm [3]

    Critical response
    Thirty years after its original release, Little White Lies magazine described Kin-dza-dza! as "Mad Max meets Monty Python by way of Tarkovsky" and said it had remained relevant to audiences.[4] Russia Beyond agreed that the film was still well-loved by Russians in 2016.[5]

    On December 1, 2016, Google celebrated the 30th anniversary of Kin-Dza-Dza! with a Google Doodle.[6]

    Animated remake
    Main article: Ku! Kin-dza-dza
    In 2013, Daneliya released an animated remake of his film, named Ku! Kin-dza-dza! (Russian: Ку! Кин-дза-дза).[7] The animated version was based on the same plot, but targeted more towards children and the international audience. It had a budget of 140 million rubles.[8] Ku! Kin-dza-dza! won Best Animated Feature Film in the 2013 Asia Pacific Screen Awards.[9] The animated remake is mainly a traditionally-animated (hand-drawn animated) feature film with some computer animation in it

    References
    DVD disk "Kin-Dza-Dza" Archived 2007-06-26 at the Wayback Machine
    Кин-дза-дза! - на Blu-ray Disc
    Кин-дза-дза! on YouTube
    Blackledge, Joel (17 July 2016). "In praise of Kin-dza-dza! - the best sci-fi film you've never heard of". Little White Lies. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
    Ustian, Gennady (24 August 2016). "'Kin-dza-dza!': The Soviet sci-fi satire that has stood the test of time". Russia Beyond. Retrieved 11 April 2020.
    "30th Anniversary of Film "Kin-Dza-Dza!"". Google. 1 December 2016.
    Ку! Кин-дза-дза-дза - СМИ о фильме - Наше кино
    "Кина не будет?" ura.ru
    "Winners announced at the 7th Annual Asia Pacific Screen Awards". Asia Pacific Screen Awards. 12 December 2013.
    Further reading
    Smith, Michael Thomas (25 July 2017). "'Kyu': A Semantic Analysis of 'Kin Dza Dza!'". Quarterly Review of Film and Video. 34 (8): 765-774. doi:10.1080/10509208.2017.1347863.
    External links
    Kin-dza-dza! at AllMovie
    Kin-dza-dza! on IMDb
    vte
    Films directed by Georgiy Daneliya
    Walking the Streets of Moscow (1963)Thirty Three (1965)Don't Grieve (1969)Hopelessly Lost (1973).


    Denis
    --- GoldED+/W32-MINGW 1.1.5-b20120519 (Kubik 3.0)
    * Origin: В начале было слово. В конце будет ориджин. (2:5064/54.1315)
  • From Dallas Hinton@1:153/7715 to Denis Mosko on Fri Oct 2 23:05:15 2020
    Hi, Denis -- on Oct 03 2020 at 03:35, you wrote:

    Kdd! is a 1986 Soviet sci-fi dystopian tragicomedy cult film
    [...]
    (1969)Hopelessly Lost (1973).

    And you posted this because?



    Cheers... Dallas

    --- timEd/NT 1.30+
    * Origin: The BandMaster, Vancouver, CANADA (1:153/7715)
  • From Denis Mosko@2:5064/54.1315 to Dallas Hinton on Sat Oct 3 10:15:58 2020
    I did like this Movie.

    Hi, Denis -- on Oct 03 2020 at 03:35, you wrote:

    KDD! is a 1986 Soviet sci-fi dystopian tragicomedy cult film
    [...]
    (1969)Hopelessly Lost (1973).

    And you posted this because?



    Dallas?

    --- GoldED+/W32-MINGW 1.1.5-b20120519 (Kubik 3.0)
    * Origin: В начале было слово. В конце будет ориджин. (2:5064/54.1315)
  • From Dallas Hinton@1:153/7715 to Denis Mosko on Sat Oct 3 03:42:18 2020
    Hi, Denis -- on Oct 03 2020 at 10:15, you wrote:

    (1969)Hopelessly Lost (1973).

    And you posted this because?

    Dallas?

    A more correct way would be to ask, "Why did you post this?"



    Cheers... Dallas

    --- timEd/NT 1.30+
    * Origin: The BandMaster, Vancouver, CANADA (1:153/7715)
  • From Denis Mosko@2:5064/54.1315 to All on Sun Oct 4 06:46:34 2020
    I was know new word: riced. Give in metro package of little knifred vegetables, and they - riced. But on rice into packageт. They simply knifed to size of rices (in real they more bigger then rices).

    --- GoldED+/W32-MINGW 1.1.5-b20120519 (Kubik 3.0)
    * Origin: В начале было слово. В конце будет ориджин. (2:5064/54.1315)
  • From Mike Powell@1:2320/105 to DENIS MOSKO on Sun Oct 4 10:34:00 2020
    I was know new word: riced. Give in metro package of little knifred vegetables,
    and they - riced. But on rice into packageт. They simply knifed to size of rice
    s (in real they more bigger then rices).

    I have never heard of "riced" vegetables (unless they are mixed in with
    rice), but I have heard of "diced" vegetables. The description you supply makes me think they are "diced."

    Mike


    * SLMR 2.1a * Remember: 'i' before 'e', except in Budweiser
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Linux
    * Origin: capitolcityonline.net * Telnet/SSH:2022/HTTP (1:2320/105)
  • From Denis Mosko@2:5064/54.1315 to Mike Powell on Sun Oct 4 19:55:32 2020
    I was know new word: riced. Give in metro package of little knifred
    vegetables, and they - riced. But on rice into packageт. They simply
    knifed to size of rice s (in real they more bigger then rices).

    I have never heard of "riced" vegetables (unless they are mixed in
    with rice), but I have heard of "diced" vegetables. The description
    you supply makes me think they are "diced."
    Yes, Mike, yes!!!!!

    --- GoldED+/W32-MINGW 1.1.5-b20120519 (Kubik 3.0)
    * Origin: В начале было слово. В конце будет ориджин. (2:5064/54.1315)
  • From Denis Mosko@2:5064/54.1315 to All on Sun Oct 4 21:28:42 2020
    Vietnam is creating new legend: "Connecting East Africa"

    "In this one-off special, he joins forces with acclaimed engineer and inventor, Dr Jordan Nguyen, as he reveals how East Africa is undergoing a digital revolution, and how Tanzania is about to see its high-speed internet access transform overnight.

    In 2018, the number of people accessing the internet pushed past 4 billion. People, businesses, and devices have moved into a permanent state of hyper-connectivity. The way we go online to trade, work, travel, even socialise, has given rise to the digital economy - a digital economy that's worth over 3 trillion US dollars.

    Southeast Asia is now the world's third largest region for internet users - with more people online than the entire population of the US. And in Vietnam, more than half the country's population is online - allowing the former war-torn country to flourish in the new, digital economy. In turn, Vietnam has become an economic role model to many developing nations around the world.

    In East Africa, getting online is still largely out of reach to most people, and this plays a major role in stagnating regional economic development.

    However, the tide is turning.

    In Tanzania, a team of highly skilled engineers have traveled over 6000 miles from Vietnam, to take the lead in building a state of the art, fibre-optic telecommunications network. When complete, it could help revolutionise the economy of one of the poorest countries on earth.

    Futurist Australian-Vietnamese Dr Jordan Nguyen pulls back the curtain on how Vietnam is redefining the digital landscape across one of the poorest regions of the world, one internet user at a time. This is Vietnam: Connecting East Africa.
    ...."

    What is new?

    --- GoldED+/W32-MINGW 1.1.5-b20120519 (Kubik 3.0)
    * Origin: В начале было слово. В конце будет ориджин. (2:5064/54.1315)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Denis Mosko on Mon Oct 12 23:20:07 2020
    Hi, Denis! Adding to what Mike said in reply to your message:

    I was know new word: riced. Give in metro package
    of little knifred vegetables, and they - riced. But
    on rice into packageт. They simply knifed to size
    of rices (in real they more bigger then rices).


    In Canadian English we'd say the vegetables had been "diced" if they appeared to have been cut with a knife into small pieces. Typically the shape is +/- that of a sugar cube, but the pieces are somewhat smaller.

    To "rice" means to force some sort of food through a coarse strainer (AKA a sieve). Apparently that's the trendy way to make mashed potatoes these days, or so the folks selling "ricers" would have us believe.... :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Denis Mosko@2:5064/54.1315 to Ardith Hinton on Tue Oct 13 17:12:38 2020
    To "rice" means to force some sort of food through a coarse strainer (AKA a sieve). Apparently that's the trendy way to make
    mashed potatoes these days, or so the folks selling "ricers" would
    have us believe.... :-)
    I do not know ... (AKA a ...). Describe it, please from Your Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA!

    --- GoldED+/W32-MINGW 1.1.5-b20120519 (Kubik 3.0)
    * Origin: В начале было слово. В конце будет ориджин. (2:5064/54.1315)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Denis Mosko on Wed Oct 14 18:12:10 2020
    Hi, Denis! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    To "rice" means to force some sort of food through
    a coarse strainer (AKA a sieve).

    I do not know ... (AKA a ...).


    "AKA" is an abbreviation for "also known as". It's used in various situations where the same person, place, or thing is often identified by two or more different names. In this case "strainer" and "sieve" are synonymous. :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Denis Mosko@2:5064/54.1315 to Ardith Hinton on Thu Oct 15 05:18:42 2020
    Hi, Ardith!

    Ardith Hinton (1:153/716) => Denis Mosko, 14 oct 20@18.12

    To "rice" means to force some sort of food through
    a coarse strainer (AKA a sieve).
    I do not know ... (AKA a ...).
    "AKA" is an abbreviation for "also known as". It's used
    in various situations where the same person, place, or thing is often identified by two or more different names. In this case "strainer"
    and "sieve" are synonymous. :-)
    A.K.A. is an abbreviation for All Known As. It's used in various situations where the same thing is oftnen identified by 2 or more different names. But what is "strainer" and "sieve" (synonymous of what?..) ?

    --- GoldED+/W32-MINGW 1.1.5-b20120519 (Kubik 3.0)
    * Origin: В начале было слово. В конце будет ориджин. (2:5064/54.1315)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Denis Mosko on Thu Oct 15 22:32:29 2020
    Hi, Denis! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    "AKA" is an abbreviation for "also known as". It's used
    in various situations where the same person, place, or
    thing is often identified by two or more different names.
    In this case "strainer" and "sieve" are synonymous. :-)

    A.K.A. is an abbreviation


    According to my North American dictionaries it may be spelled a.k.a., aka, or AKA... but we don't use periods if the letters are capitalized.



    for All Known As.


    Careful! The substitution of "all" for "also" changes the meaning.



    But what is "strainer" and "sieve" (synonymous
    of what?..) ?


    In this example I'm referring to a container which has holes in it... the sort of thing you might use for rinsing fresh berries with water before you eat them. When my usual resources define "strainer" as "sieve" and vice versa, I'd say they regard these two words as synonyms (n.)... or as synonymous (adj.)
    *with each other*. Synonyms are words which have +/- the same meaning.... :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Denis Mosko@2:5064/54.1315 to Ardith Hinton on Fri Oct 16 09:17:50 2020
    A.K.A. is an abbreviation
    According to my North American dictionaries it may be
    spelled a.k.a., aka, or AKA... but we don't use periods if the letters
    are capitalized.
    for All Known As.
    Careful! The substitution of "all" for "also" changes the meaning.
    Is is synonyms?

    But what is "strainer" and "sieve" (synonymous
    of what?..) ?
    In this example I'm referring to a container which has holes
    in it... the sort of thing you might use for rinsing fresh berries
    with water before you eat them. When my usual resources define
    "strainer" as "sieve" and vice versa, I'd say they regard these two
    words as synonyms (n.)... or as synonymous (adj.) *with each other*. Synonyms are words which have +/- the same meaning.... :-)
    What is synonym of 2 of them?

    --- GoldED+/W32-MINGW 1.1.5-b20120519 (Kubik 3.0)
    * Origin: В начале было слово. В конце будет ориджин. (2:5064/54.1315)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Denis Mosko on Sun Oct 18 16:15:04 2020
    Hi, Denis! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    The substitution of "all" for "also" changes the
    meaning.

    Is is synonyms?


    No, "all" and "also" are not synonyms.

    Occasionally we can omit letters or entire words in English without changing the meaning. But "also" seems to be a contraction of "all so", i.e. the translation of a word from Old English. That's as brief as it gets. :-Q



    When my usual resources define "strainer" as "sieve"
    and vice versa, I'd say they regard these two words
    as synonyms (n.)... or as synonymous (adj.) *with each
    other*. Synonyms are words which have +/- the same
    meaning.... :-)

    What is synonym of 2 of them?


    It's often said there are no exact synonyms in English... and while the "rule" may have "exceptions", a pair like this is all I can come up with.

    Since you are interested in cooking, however... the larger version, equipped with three or four legs & used to drain bulky food items like cooked spaghetti or fresh lettuce leaves, is known around here as a "colander". :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Denis Mosko@2:5064/54.1315 to Ardith Hinton on Mon Oct 19 05:30:30 2020
    Is it synonyms?
    No, "all" and "also" are not synonyms.
    Occasionally we can omit letters or entire words in English without changing the meaning. But "also" seems to be a contraction of "all so", i.e. the translation of a word from Old English. That's as brief as it gets. :-Q
    :-Q - what is from your mooth?

    When my usual resources define "strainer" as "sieve"
    and vice versa, I'd say they regard these two words
    as synonyms (n.)... or as synonymous (adj.)
    *with each other*. Synonyms are words which have +/- the same
    meaning.... :-)
    :-)

    What is synonym of 2 of them?
    It's often said there are no exact synonyms in English...
    and while the "rule" may have "exceptions", a pair like this is all I
    can come up with.
    :-( I do not know, Ardith.

    Since you are interested in cooking, however... the larger version, equipped with three or four legs & used to drain bulky food
    items like cooked spaghetti or fresh lettuce leaves, is known around
    here as a "colander". :-)
    Android Collaider? ;-)

    --- GoldED+/W32-MINGW 1.1.5-b20120519 (Kubik 3.0)
    * Origin: В начале было слово. В конце будет ориджин. (2:5064/54.1315)
  • From Denis Mosko@2:5064/54.1315 to Ardith Hinton on Wed Oct 21 06:32:36 2020
    Hi, Ardith!
    !/usr/bin/env python 3
    -*- coding: cp12512 -*-
    """ meaning Isis synonyms
    No, "all" and "also" are not synonyms.
    Occasionally we can omit letters or entire words in English without changing the meaning. But "also" seems to be a contraction of "all so", i.e. the translation of a word from Old English. That's as brief as it gets. :-Q
    What is synonym of 2 of them?
    It's often said there are no exact synonyms in English...
    and while the "rule" may have "exceptions", a pair like this is all I
    can come up with.
    from ...
    from ...
    def ...
    def ...
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
    def ...
    def clockface(radius):
    reset()
    pensize(7)
    for i in range(60):
    jump(radius)_ _if i % 5 == 0: fd(...
    ---
    * Origin: В начале было слово. В конце будет ориджин. (2:5064/54.1315)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Denis Mosko on Wed Oct 21 23:26:11 2020
    Hi, Denis! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    Occasionally we can omit letters or entire words
    in English without changing the meaning. But "also"
    seems to be a contraction of "all so", i.e. the
    translation of a word from Old English. That's as
    brief as it gets. :-Q

    :-Q - what is from your mooth?


    I use ":-Q" to indicate a "tongue-in-cheek" comment... i.e an ironic or facetious remark not to be taken too seriously. I have also seen ":-P" and other variations used where the author is limited to a standard keyboard. :-)



    It's often said there are no exact synonyms in English...
    and while the "rule" may have "exceptions", a pair like
    this is all I can come up with.

    :-( I do not know, Ardith.


    Not to worry. As we say in English... "Rome wasn't built in a day". UK/US pairs are mentioned from time to time, however, in this echo. :-)



    Since you are interested in cooking, however... the
    larger version, equipped with three or four legs &
    used to drain bulky food items like cooked spaghetti
    or fresh lettuce leaves, is known around here as a
    "colander". :-)

    Android Collaider? ;-)


    I reckon you may be onto something, but I don't understand what you mean by "Collaider". Are you thinking of "collide" [v.] as in "come together violently by force"? I know the vowel sounds in Russian are a bit different from what I'm used to, which is how I read your spelling of "mouth".... :-))




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Denis Mosko@2:5064/54.1315 to All on Sat Oct 24 05:18:58 2020
    Today we gonna examine some English proverbs and their Russian equivalents. Some of them are obvious, some are quite unexpected. Hope you will learn something new!

    1. It's better to be safe than sorry
    Literally: ...
    Russian equivalent: ...

    2. Still waters run deep

    3. Don't put all your eggs in one basket

    4. Don't bite the hand that feeds you

    5. Beggars can't be choosers

    6. Ignorance is bliss

    7. A picture is worth a thousand words

    Here are some unique English proverbs that don't have a Russian equivalent:
    - Suffering for a friend doubleth friendship

    - A volunteer is worth twenty pressed men

    - It's better to light a candle than curse the darkness

    Try to remember some of the proverbs and use them on our meetings!

    #around_Great_Britain
    --- GoldED+/W32-MINGW 1.1.5-b20120519 (Kubik 3.0)
    * Origin: В начале было слово. В конце будет ориджин. (2:5064/54.1315)