• Am I all set now? ;-)

    From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to All on Tue Jun 16 21:13:54 2020
    Hi, All!

    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    Hi ko@yahoo.com,

    ko@yahoo.com
    Someone on an unrecognized device attempted to sign in to your Yahoo
    account.
    This sign in attempt was made on:
    Device
    chrome, windows nt
    When
    June 15, 2020 12:59:14 PM PDT
    Where*
    Russia
    xx.xx.xx.xx (hidden)
    If this was you, you're all set!
    Didn't sign in recently?
    Review your account activity and remove the devices and apps that you
    don't recognize.
    https://login.yahoo.com/account/activity
    Thanks,
    Yahoo
    ----- The end of the citation -----

    If it was me "I am all set". Yes, it was me, so I am all set now.

    But what does "all set" mean in other words?

    PS: Besides, they wrote "was", not "were".

    Bye, All!
    Alexander Koryagin

    ---
    * Origin: nntps://news.fidonet.fi (2:221/6.0)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to Alexander Koryagin on Tue Jun 16 11:41:26 2020
    Hello Alexander,

    If it was me "I am all set". Yes, it was me, so I am all set now.

    But what does "all set" mean in other words?

    No action needed on your part.

    PS: Besides, they wrote "was", not "were".

    Yep, that seems correct in this case.

    I once got an email like that from gmail. Someone had logged in and changed the password. I was able to get gmail to send a code to my phone and get my account back.

    Ttyl :-),
    Al

    --- GoldED+/LNX
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Alan Ianson on Tue Jun 16 22:28:35 2020
    Hi, Alan! Recently you wrote in a message to Alexander Koryagin:

    If it was me "I am all set". Yes, it was me,
    so I am all set now.

    But what does "all set" mean in other words?

    No action needed on your part.


    My CANADIAN OXFORD says "ready to proceed". Either way, the idea is that if Alexander expresses no objection there shouldn't be any further drama.



    PS: Besides, they wrote "was", not "were".

    Yep, that seems correct in this case.


    I would say so. Perhaps Alexander is thinking of situations where a person is imagining e.g. how it might feel to be in somebody else's shoes. If money were no object I'd buy one of those fairy tale German castles & equip it with a pipe organ. In real life Yahoo wanted to ensure the person claiming to be Alexander was Alexander when he used different hardware &/or software. :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to Alan Ianson on Wed Jun 17 09:44:28 2020
    Hi, Alan Ianson! -> Alexander Koryagin
    I read your message from 16.06.2020 11:41

    If it was me "I am all set". Yes, it was me, so I am all
    set now.

    But what does "all set" mean in other words?

    No action needed on your part.

    PS: Besides, they wrote "was", not "were".

    Yep, that seems correct in this case.


    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    If this was you, you're all set!
    Didn't sign in recently?
    Review your account activity and remove the devices and apps that you
    don't recognize.
    ----- The end of the citation -----

    I just thought that the rule should follow from the rule "I was, you were, he was"...

    Bye, Alan!
    Alexander Koryagin
    english_tutor 2020

    ---
    * Origin: nntps://news.fidonet.fi (2:221/6.0)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Alexander Koryagin on Sat Jun 20 13:42:44 2020
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to Alan Ianson:

    If this was you, you're all set!

    I just thought that the rule should follow from the rule
    "I was, you were, he was"...


    Ah. While the use of "if" does add a layer of complexity here, the issue appears to be more about pattern recognition.

    When you knock on somebody's door & they ask "Who's there?" you can answer (formally) "It is I" or (informally) "It's me" as long as they know you well enough to recognize your voice. Although Yahoo can't hear your voice, it can use other means to let you know what's going on in case somebody is trying to impersonate you. If all is well, no reply is necessary.

    When I drop something in the kitchen & Dallas... who is in the next room... asks "Was that you?" he's doing much the same thing. He knows from my response whether or not to grab his cell phone & prepare to call 911. :-))

    Yahoo is using the sort of informal English native speakers tend to use with family & friends when Miss Stickler can't hear them. Another example may be seen &/or heard in one of our favourite short stories, THE DAY DAD MADE TOAST. When Dad asks Mom "Where are the big blue plates?" she replies "In the dishwasher." Robin Williams does quite a nice job with it on YouTube.... :-)

    In its entirety, Yahoo's message is a two-part question: "Somebody tried to gain access to your account using [blah blah]... was that you?" IMHO the response Yahoo anticipates is "Yes, it was me" or "No, it wasn't me". :-Q




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)