• A pigeon simile... 1.

    From Anton Shepelev@2:221/6 to Ardith Hinton on Fri May 1 20:04:54 2020
    Ardith Hinton to Anton Shepelev:

    I'm reminded here of Jacqueline Susann's novel VALLEY
    OF THE DOLLS, where women in particular were given pills
    which may have made them feel better temporarily but
    which did not address the underlying problem(s).

    [A learner's question:]
    I never became friendly with this consturction: may have
    made. Does it mean "it is possible that they made"? If so,
    is it correct to use the present tense to describe events
    in a novel introduced in the past tense (were given)?

    It is possible [that] they made the users feel better temporarily... yes. Either way the events of the story are in
    the past tense, and whatever we write in the preamble has far
    more to do with our own reasoning processes.

    Thanks, I mean what you see (or the other way round).

    One of the things which may be confusing you here is an idiomatic
    use of "it". ;-)

    In "it is possible that..."? I have no problems with this dummy `it'
    that I wot of... If, however, you refer to the error I made in a
    tag quesion that you so kindly corrected in another post, that was
    just a mental misstep (here is another alliteration for you).

    While I don't know of any formal scientific studies on
    the topic I'd highly recommend Bernie Siegel's book LOVE,
    MEDICINE & MIRACLES. The author is an oncologist who noticed
    that some of his patients appeared to be doing better than
    expected, and made it his business to figure out why. Over the
    years I've noticed similar comments from various other front line
    workers as well.... :-)

    That is certainly interesting. Our minds are have stronger effect
    on our bodies than is usually thought, what with stigmae and the
    yogi. As a nurse told me during a regular medical inspection at the
    university, all illnesses are because of the nerves, and only one
    because of love :-)

    ---
    * Origin: nntps://news.fidonet.fi (2:221/6.0)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Anton Shepelev on Thu Apr 30 21:32:14 2020
    Hi, Anton! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    I'm reminded here of Jacqueline Susann's novel VALLEY
    OF THE DOLLS, where women in particular were given pills
    which may have made them feel better temporarily but
    which did not address the underlying problem(s).

    [A learner's question:]
    I never became friendly with this consturction: may have
    made. Does it mean "it is possible that they made"? If so,
    is it correct to use the present tense to describe events
    in a novel introduced in the past tense (were given)?


    It is possible [that] they made the users feel better temporarily... yes. Either way the events of the story are in the past tense, and whatever we write in the preamble has far more to do with our own reasoning processes. One of the things which may be confusing you here is an idiomatic use of "it". ;-)



    Recently I've heard that some folks have run afoul of the
    laws re practising medicine without a licence in advertisements
    for vitamin & mineral supplements, claiming they'll prevent
    or even cure COVID-19.

    Yeah, perfidious peddlers of lucrative lies.


    Nice alliteration... [chuckle].



    the results can't be guaranteed... and there is a lot of
    evidence suggesting that a person's spiritual beliefs &/or
    relationships with other people may help too.

    Scientific evidence? I wonder how and what they found out.


    While I don't know of any formal scientific studies on the topic I'd highly recommend Bernie Siegel's book LOVE, MEDICINE & MIRACLES. The author is an oncologist who noticed that some of his patients appeared to be doing better than expected, and made it his business to figure out why. Over the years I've noticed similar comments from various other front line workers as well.... :-)



    When I read his biography I see why this author may have
    found neither of the latter met his needs.... :-Q

    Bierice? Because he was so bitter?


    Apparently he had some doubts about religion... he divorced his wife ... then she & two of his children predeceased him, one by suicide. Perhaps he started out with a healthy skepticism which turned to bitterness later.... :-/




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)