• Erratum... 1.

    From alexander koryagin@3:640/384 to Ardith Hinton on Sun Feb 11 19:27:23 2018
    Hi, Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 09.02.2018 15:16

    So many that I can detect Alexander having fits of frustration,
    based on the server's logfile entries.


    Hmm... I wondered why he hadn't said much here lately & thought it
    might be because of something I did. If he's writing up a storm
    with you, at least I know he's still alive & paying attention.

    I am still alive, although my mood is not very good. I read this area, although
    somehow I can't find good questions to ask. :)

    Note to Alexander: You are the person I count on to ask about the
    issues ten other people were wondering about but were too shy to
    ask....

    I have stretched my ears. ;)

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    ENGLISH_TUTOR 2018

    --- Paul's Win98SE VirtualBox
    * Origin: Quinn's Post - Maryborough, Queensland, OZ (3:640/384)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Paul Quinn on Fri Feb 9 22:16:51 2018
    Hi, Paul! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    I reckon you mean "faux pas".

    Yes. I was being inventive again. Usually it goes
    by the alternative 'fox paw', which I'm guessing you
    would have recognized straight up. I do this when
    I'm too lazy to check with Uncle Google for the
    genuine French.


    I have seen Fox News referred to as "Faux News" in other echoes... i.e. by writers who don't approve of the content. And I can see how "paw" is related to "[foot]step" because, when writers in Z2 forget to toggle a switch controlling the language of the salutation, I associate "skriev" or "schrieb" with "scribe" but won't guarantee I've spelled it exactly as written. What I had in mind was that our friends who are not native speakers of English & who have learned chiefly via reading might be confused by phonetic spellings.

    I think it must seem rather peculiar to folks from other countries that native speakers of English can get their minds around words like "cough" and "knife" and "sleigh" and "yacht" but balk at French, though. I wonder if there's still some lingering resentment against William of Normandy (1066 and All That). OTOH French was the international language of Europe... including Russia... for hundreds of years, and many educated Russians can read it. :-)



    Compleat (sic) with another misspelling, later regretted.


    Ah... I see you caught the ball & ran with it! Usage note for the benefit of other readers:

    1. "sic" is used to call attention to something, especially something which
    appears to be an error. What Paul & I are doing here is having fun with
    the language. I made a joke by misspelling a word, but flagged the word
    with "sic" & used the correct spelling later.

    2. "compleat" is a 16th-17th century spelling of "complete". Although it's
    rarely seen nowadays, it may still be used in a jocular manner.



    I've been making quite a few mistakes recently.


    I noticed a couple of minor spelling errors. WRT you & Alexander, however, I don't correct what I think you'll see for yourselves the next time you glance over what you've typed &/or somebody quotes it.

    If you've seen me putting upper &/or lower case letters where they don't belong recently, BTW, it's because I had to replace my old monitor with one which won't let me use the font I'm accustomed to... (sigh).



    So many that I can detect Alexander having fits
    of frustration, based on the server's logfile
    entries.


    Hmm... I wondered why he hadn't said much here lately & thought it might be because of something I did. If he's writing up a storm with you, at least I know he's still alive & paying attention.

    Note to Alexander: You are the person I count on to ask about the issues ten other people were wondering about but were too shy to ask.... ;-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to alexander koryagin on Mon Feb 12 20:36:46 2018
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    I am still alive, although my mood is not very good.
    I read this area, although somehow I can't find good
    questions to ask. :)


    Sounds like a case of the January blahs... a phenomenon well known to
    North Americans who live some distance from the Equator.

    Glad to hear from you, anyway. Thanks for checking in.... :-)



    Note to Alexander: You are the person I count on to
    ask about the issues ten other people were wondering
    about but were too shy to ask....

    I have stretched my ears. ;)


    Okay, here's an idea. In my next reply to Paul... i.e. the second of
    two parts, which I intend to post very soon... I surprised even myself by using
    "the" in a certain way. I'm developing a theory, if you're interested.... :-Q




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From alexander koryagin@3:640/384 to Ardith Hinton on Wed Feb 14 20:45:36 2018
    Hi, Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 12.02.2018 14:36
    about Erratum... 1..

    I am still alive, although my mood is not very good. I read this
    area, although somehow I can't find good
    questions to ask. :)

    Sounds like a case of the January blahs... a phenomenon well known
    to North Americans who live some distance from the Equator.

    Yes, maybe. Now we have frost and sun -- probably it will be nice to have a couple kilometers on skis and a red nose.

    Glad to hear from you, anyway. Thanks for checking in.... :-)

    Note to Alexander: You are the person I count on to ask about the
    issues ten other people were wondering about but were too shy to
    ask....
    I have stretched my ears. ;)

    Okay, here's an idea. In my next reply to Paul... i.e. the second
    of two parts, which I intend to post very soon... I surprised even
    myself by using "the" in a certain way. I'm developing a theory, if
    you're interested....: - Q

    Oh, English articles is my favourite subject. I still don't have a good map of this forest. ;=)

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    ENGLISH_TUTOR 2018

    --- Paul's Win98SE VirtualBox
    * Origin: Quinn's Post - Maryborough, Queensland, OZ (3:640/384)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to alexander koryagin on Tue Feb 20 14:12:27 2018
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    Sounds like a case of the January blahs... a
    phenomenon well known to North Americans who
    live some distance from the Equator.

    Yes, maybe. Now we have frost and sun --


    Assuming from some of your earlier posts that you live in or around Moscow & that the prevailing wind comes from the Atlantic Ocean, I reckon the situation is comparable to what I know about the more northerly parts of BC & about the Canadian prairies. It's my guess that you don't have anywhere near the annual precipitation of Vancouver... where the rain clouds disgorge their contents as soon as they hit the mountains... but the snow hangs around until late spring. In our case, Mother Nature is making up for the absence of rain last summer & we've had little else since early November.

    Years ago, I enjoyed reading what Erma Bombeck & Peg Bracken had to say about housewifery. One or the other made a comment to the effect that it wasn't the cooking she minded so much as the dailiness. I don't mind rain so much as the dailiness whereas you may feel the same way about snow... [grin].



    probably it will be nice to have a couple kilometers
    on skis and a red nose.


    Yes, physical exercise is a known mood elevator. So is sunshine... especially if one can get outdoors during the daylight hours.

    There are many situations occurring at this time of year over which one has little or no control. As a university student, I well understood why the suicide rate tends to peak in mid-January. You get two weeks off... then you get five or six major assignments within two days. Others feel depressed when the bills start rolling in. The credit card company wants money. Every club or association you've ever belonged to wants money. You have to pay the deductible before your medical insurance kicks in. The city wants you to pay half the taxes they're planning to bill you next June. The list goes on & on ... but if you can play in the snow I'd suggest seizing the opportunity. :-)



    Oh, English articles is my favourite subject.


    Good! We won't run out of things to talk about any time soon. ;-)



    I still don't have a good map of this forest. ;=)


    The subject is complex... and I gather the use of articles is quite different in Russian. In English we sometimes say people can't see the woods for the trees, meaning they're so preoccupied with minor details that they're unable to grasp the big picture. OTOH maps also have their shortcomings, and there are times when it makes sense to follow the lay of the land.

    WRT articles, your asking about the use of articles in a particular context works for me. That way we can both study the woods a bit at a time & the sort of map you'd like will emerge as we put these bits together.... :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From alexander koryagin@3:640/384 to Ardith Hinton on Fri Feb 23 01:49:24 2018
    Hi, Ardith Hinton!
    I read your message from 20.02.2018 08:12
    about Erratum... 1..

    Sounds like a case of the January blahs... a phenomenon well known
    to North Americans who live some distance from the Equator.

    Yes, maybe. Now we have frost and sun --

    Assuming from some of your earlier posts that you live in or around
    Moscow & that the prevailing wind comes from the Atlantic Ocean, I
    reckon the situation is comparable to what I know about the more
    northerly parts of BC & about the Canadian prairies.

    A normal Moscow winter should be cold. Minus 10C is the norm. When winds go from the Atlantic Ocean we have thaws.

    It's my guess
    that you don't have anywhere near the annual precipitation of
    Vancouver... where the rain clouds disgorge their contents as soon
    as they hit the mountains... but the snow hangs around until late
    spring. In our case, Mother Nature is making up for the absence of
    rain last summer & we've had little else since early November.

    The near ocean gives a lot of snow, but it probably should also provide a mild winter, without heavy frosts.

    Years ago, I enjoyed reading what Erma Bombeck & Peg Bracken had to
    say about housewifery. One or the other made a comment to the
    effect that it wasn't the cooking she minded so much as the
    dailiness. I don't mind rain so much as the dailiness whereas you
    may feel the same way about snow... [grin].

    Change "snow" for "frost" and you will like snow dailiness. ;-) They say a human can be accustomed to anything but cold.

    probably it will be nice to have a couple kilometers on skis and a
    red nose.

    Yes, physical exercise is a known mood elevator. So is sunshine... especially if one can get outdoors during the daylight hours.

    There are many situations occurring at this time of year over which
    one has little or no control. As a university student, I well
    understood why the suicide rate tends to peak in mid-January. You
    get two weeks off... then you get five or six major assignments
    within two days. Others feel depressed when the bills start rolling
    <skipped>

    Especially hard are the bills sent by bad decisions of your life. It seems to me that a bad memory appears when it becomes a remedy. ;-)

    Oh, English articles is my favourite subject.
    Good! We won't run out of things to talk about any time soon. ;-)
    I still don't have a good map of this forest. ;=)

    The subject is complex... and I gather the use of articles is quite different in Russian. In English we sometimes say people can't see
    the woods for the trees, meaning they're so preoccupied with minor
    details that they're unable to grasp the big picture. OTOH maps
    also have their shortcomings, and there are times when it makes
    sense to follow the lay of the land.

    Another problem is that poor eyes don't allow to read much.

    WRT articles, your asking about the use of articles in a particular context works for me. That way we can both study the woods a bit at
    a time & the sort of map you'd like will emerge as we put these
    bits together.... :-)

    So may it be.

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    ENGLISH_TUTOR 2018

    --- Paul's Win98SE VirtualBox
    * Origin: Quinn's Post - Maryborough, Queensland, OZ (3:640/384)