• Beaver de Pesky!

    From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001.32 to Nicholas Boel on Sun Jul 23 23:50:28 2017
    Hey Nicholas!

    ----- '<Esc>:read !ls /tools/lib/modules/ /tools/boot/' starts
    /tools/boot/:
    bcm2710-rpi-3-b.dtb
    bcm2837-rpi-3-b.dtb
    kernel8.img

    /tools/lib/modules/:
    4.9.39-v8-arm64
    ----- '<Esc>:read !ls /tools/lib/modules/ /tools/boot/' ends

    The above is hot out of the raspi3 oven and now sitting on the window sill to cool.

    I need another microSD card for it but the very first attempt at a bootable toolchain (stage2) is ready whenever the time it right. Should be next weekend
    if things go according to plan.

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Future cybertoasts of note:
    2018-01-01 is 162 days from now and falls on a Monday.
    2024-11-05 is 2662 days from now and falls on a Tuesday.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.12(1)-release (arm-slackware-linux-gnueabi)
    * Origin: Pointy Stick Society - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001.32)
  • From Nicholas Boel@1:154/10 to Maurice Kinal on Sun Jul 23 20:58:16 2017
    Hello,

    On Mon, 24 Jul 2017 04:50:28 GMT, Maurice Kinal -> Nicholas Boel wrote:

    I need another microSD card for it but the very first attempt at a bootable toolchain (stage2) is ready whenever the time it right. Should be next weekend if things go according to plan.

    Nice work! If I get some free time here this week, I should have ArchlinuxARM booted up in an hour or so. All that compile time is for the birds when you can
    actually be using your machine instead. ;)

    Regards,
    Nick

    .... "Не знаю. Я здесь только работаю."

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/52
    * Origin: thePharcyde_ distribution system (1:154/10)
  • From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001 to Nicholas Boel on Mon Jul 24 02:49:10 2017
    Hey Nicholas!

    I should have ArchlinuxARM booted up in an hour or so.

    Is it a 64 bit version? I only could find ArchLinuxARM-rpi-3-latest in my searches for existing 64 bit raspi distributions and that one lacks gcc which is a deal breaker as far as I am concerned. Linux without gcc isn't worth booting up nevermind committing to a microSD card.

    All that compile time is for the birds

    Hm. That could explain why there are so many sitting on my window sill today.
    Stinkin' birds.

    when you can actually be using your machine instead

    Yes but compiling native systems *IS* the very first and main usage for any machine I have the pleasure of working with. Until someone comes up with something I will use I honestly don't see a stock distribution getting much use
    from me, which means that machines sit idle collecting dust, and that would be a terrible waste.

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Don't cry for me I have vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.12(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's Brain - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001)
  • From Nicholas Boel@1:154/10 to Maurice Kinal on Mon Jul 24 15:09:16 2017
    Hello,

    On Mon, 24 Jul 2017 07:49:10 GMT, Maurice Kinal -> Nicholas Boel wrote:

    I should have ArchlinuxARM booted up in an hour or so.

    Is it a 64 bit version?

    Of course it is. ;)

    I only could find ArchLinuxARM-rpi-3-latest in my searches for existing
    64 bit raspi distributions and that one lacks gcc which is a deal
    breaker as far as I am concerned. Linux without gcc isn't worth
    booting up nevermind committing to a microSD card.

    Not sure where you were searching, but this is the _only_ place I get anything ArchLinuxARM from:

    https://archlinuxarm.org/platforms/armv8/broadcom

    You can simplify that link back to platforms in order to see the list of all packages they supply.

    That package I believe is a supplied kernel and root filesystem *only*. Once you move your card to the raspi3, have networking going and login, you can continue to install gcc and friends, along with whatever else you may want.

    That may not be a great situation for someone without networking, but I don't run any of my computer hardware wireless. I use wireless for TVs, tablets, and phones.. that's about it.

    All that compile time is for the birds

    Hm. That could explain why there are so many sitting on my window sill today. Stinkin' birds.

    Very possible! ;)

    when you can actually be using your machine instead

    Yes but compiling native systems *IS* the very first and main usage for any machine I have the pleasure of working with. Until someone comes up with something I will use I honestly don't see a stock distribution getting much use from me, which means that machines sit idle collecting dust, and that would be a terrible waste.

    In your case, I can see your point. However, I tend to find a use for all my hardware, and don't care to sit and compile things for a week or more before I can actually use it.

    Regards,
    Nick

    .... "Не знаю. Я здесь только работаю."

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/52
    * Origin: thePharcyde_ distribution system (1:154/10)
  • From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001.32 to Nicholas Boel on Mon Jul 24 21:33:36 2017
    Hey Nicholas!

    https://archlinuxarm.org/platforms/armv8/broadcom

    Exactly the same as here. Thank you for the confirmation.

    don't care to sit and compile things for a week or more before I
    can actually use it.

    Understood. This arm-slackware-linux-gnueabi is like that except it is 32 bit.
    It took me a day to build an arm64 stage2 enviroment plus a 64 bit kernel. We'll see how long the final stage3 takes once I nab another microSD card for it. I am in no rush.

    The true beauty is all the source is known as well as I never need to add additional bloat. Only the stuff I actually will use. I cannot say the same about any other OS.

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Future cybertoasts of note:
    2018-01-01 is 161 days from now and falls on a Monday.
    2024-11-05 is 2661 days from now and falls on a Tuesday.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.12(1)-release (arm-slackware-linux-gnueabi)
    * Origin: Pointy Stick Society - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001.32)
  • From Nicholas Boel@1:154/10 to Maurice Kinal on Mon Jul 24 20:44:50 2017
    Hello,

    On Tue, 25 Jul 2017 02:33:36 GMT, Maurice Kinal -> Nicholas Boel wrote:

    Exactly the same as here. Thank you for the confirmation.

    No problemo.

    Understood. This arm-slackware-linux-gnueabi is like that except it is
    32 bit. It took me a day to build an arm64 stage2 enviroment plus a 64 bit kernel. We'll see how long the final stage3 takes once I nab
    another microSD card for it. I am in no rush.

    Well, I followed the instructions and used the ArchLinuxARM-rpi-3-latest.tar.gz
    instead, and am now sitting at the console of my 64bit system. Only the base packages are installed, along with gcc and friends (yes, I had to install that afterwards), and terminus-font. Everything is configured for UTF-8 and my local
    timezone is set. That's enough for today. ;)

    [accession@flakjacket ~]$ uname -a
    Linux flakjacket 4.12.3-1-ARCH #1 SMP Fri Jul 21 21:02:07 MDT 2017 aarch64 GNU/Linux

    Obviously the kernel was installed before I switched over to my timezone, which
    is CDT. Not sure why the MDT was there as when I installed the kernel I was on UTC.. <shrug>

    The true beauty is all the source is known as well as I never need to
    add additional bloat. Only the stuff I actually will use. I cannot say the same about any other OS.

    While I agree with you on the bloat, I have the space. Whatever bloat was indeed installed wasn't all that much (core utilities and base packages). Looks
    like I'm sitting at about 1.2g of disk space used out of 128gb. I'll chalk that
    up as a win so far! ;)

    Regards,
    Nick

    .... "Не знаю. Я здесь только работаю."

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/52
    * Origin: thePharcyde_ distribution system (1:154/10)
  • From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001 to Nicholas Boel on Tue Jul 25 05:37:09 2017
    Hey Nicholas!

    Linux flakjacket 4.12.3-1-ARCH

    How did you manage that? I don't know enough about pacman to replicate that particular upgrade. When I tried it wouldn't update since the kernel modules weren't updated to match.

    While I agree with you on the bloat, I have the space.

    Same here but I hate wasting it for things that will never get used. Anyhow it
    is the same situation with slackwarearm which is 32 bit so I give Archlinux the
    edge simply because of the quantum leap to 64 bit. Now I'll try building a native aarch64-unknown-linux-gnu toolchain and see where that ends up. If that
    works out the next step will be to learn the bootloader so I can install a truly minimalized console based aarch64-unknown-linux-gnu without *ANY* of the bloat.

    Kids these days. :::sigh:::

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Don't cry for me I have vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.12(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's Brain - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001)
  • From Nicholas Boel@1:154/10 to Maurice Kinal on Tue Jul 25 15:29:34 2017
    Hello,

    On Tue, 25 Jul 2017 10:37:08 GMT, Maurice Kinal -> Nicholas Boel wrote:

    Linux flakjacket 4.12.3-1-ARCH

    How did you manage that? I don't know enough about pacman to replicate that particular upgrade. When I tried it wouldn't update since the
    kernel modules weren't updated to match.

    I just followed the instructions for the raspi3 (but instead of using ArchLinuxARM-rpi-2-latest.tar.gz I used ArchLinuxARM-rpi-3-latest.tar.gz). Exactly what the end of that page says if you want a 64bit system.

    Once you get to the last step where you insert the card into the raspi3, you login as root with password root. Change the root password, add a user and make
    sure to add them to the group 'wheel'. Then I deleted the default "alarm" user.
    Then just type "pacman -Syu" to upgrade the whole system to the latest packages. That gave me the latest kernel and compiled it during the upgrade. I just had to reboot afterwards.

    Easy peazy! ;)

    Same here but I hate wasting it for things that will never get used. Anyhow it is the same situation with slackwarearm which is 32 bit so I give Archlinux the edge simply because of the quantum leap to 64 bit.
    Now I'll try building a native aarch64-unknown-linux-gnu toolchain and
    see where that ends up. If that works out the next step will be to
    learn the bootloader so I can install a truly minimalized console based aarch64-unknown-linux-gnu without *ANY* of the bloat.

    You're going to make this a lot harder than it really is, aren't you? ;)

    If you follow the instructions, it's easy. Then you can simply do something like "pacman -S base" and "pacman -S core" to see what packages were indeed installed, and uninstall the ones you don't want/need (using "pacman -Rsu" or something similar). It would still be 10x faster than the way you're going about it, however, there's no optimizing the code and compiling yourself - which seems to be something you still enjoy.

    In that case, I don't blame you. Keep on keepin' on. I spent 10+ years compiling everything with Gentoo and FreeBSD only to eventually get tired of waiting, and waiting, and waiiiiiiting. ;)

    Regards,
    Nick

    .... "Не знаю. Я здесь только работаю."

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/52
    * Origin: thePharcyde_ distribution system (1:154/10)
  • From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001 to Nicholas Boel on Tue Jul 25 21:45:36 2017
    Hey Nicholas!

    Easy peazy!

    Only if you have a networked dhcp server to the outside world which I don't. I
    have to hack the wired networking scheme for ArchLinuxARM-rpi-3-latest prior to
    it's first boot to make the 'Easy peazy!' stuff work. I thought I could take care of all that post install but apparently I am missing something. Both my internetted machines are static IP addresses and the connection hardware doesn't do dhcpcd or anything like it. I have to take care of it at my end ...
    don't hold your breath. ;-)

    You're going to make this a lot harder than it really is, aren't
    you?

    I haven't decided yet. What I might do is use ArchLinuxARM-rpi-3-latest to build the first stage3 enviroment seeing it is so close to that given the 64 bit capabilities and it's gcc seems to think it is aarch64-unknown-linux-gnu which is what the stage2 enviroment slackwarearm managed to build. Using archlinux does save a few steps.

    I spent 10+ years compiling everything with Gentoo

    0 years with gentoo. At least a decade with slackware though. After that it more or less became a bastardized version of many different - and yet the same - sources in order to maintain a non-GUI enviroment, or at least the base system(s) never needed a GUI. Everytime I've bothered installing xorg and friends I never use it beyond testing that it does indeed work ... if I didn't screw it up that is.

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Don't cry for me I have vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.12(1)-release (x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's Brain - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001)
  • From Nicholas Boel@1:154/10 to Maurice Kinal on Tue Jul 25 19:08:40 2017
    Hello,

    On Wed, 26 Jul 2017 02:45:36 GMT, Maurice Kinal -> Nicholas Boel wrote:

    Only if you have a networked dhcp server to the outside world which I don't. I have to hack the wired networking scheme for ArchLinuxARM-rpi-3-latest prior to it's first boot to make the 'Easy peazy!' stuff work.

    If you can use one of your static wired machines to create the microSD card (via usb card reader or whatever), then you should be able to get the base system up and running. Once you move the microSD card to the raspi, then you should be able to configure your networking first and foremost. After that, gcc
    and whatever else you need can be installed.

    don't hold your breath. ;-)

    I have a feeling you'll do just fine. ;)

    0 years with gentoo. At least a decade with slackware though. After

    Basically the same, except different package managers. Both can be a very basic
    install and build from source on top of it.

    at least the base system(s) never needed a GUI. Everytime I've bothered installing xorg and friends I never use it beyond testing that it does indeed work ... if I didn't screw it up that is.

    It has come a long way, and finally when they get things in better condition than it was, they move to another one (wayland or whatever it is). I would rather not even bother, especially on any kind of server machine.

    Regards,
    Nick

    .... "Не знаю. Я здесь только работаю."

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/52
    * Origin: thePharcyde_ distribution system (1:154/10)
  • From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001 to Nicholas Boel on Wed Jul 26 01:20:49 2017
    Hey Nicholas!

    If you can use one of your static wired machines to create the
    microSD card

    That is exactly what I am doing. The only machine free at the moment is the x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu host which is also doing all the fidonet and other development stuff, including taking care of it's needs, that I am working on. Speaking of which, both glibc-2.26 and gcc-7.2 are gearing up for releases in the next couple of weeks ... or so. Those are two of the top three needed and extremely desirable things as far as I am personally concerned, the other being
    kernel source. So the timing is a bit off as far as getting aarch64-unknown-linux-gnu to fly ... unless of course I nail it before both glibc-2.26 and gcc-7.2 are released. If not then it probably won't sit idle for too long.

    I have a feeling you'll do just fine.

    Heh, heh. That remains to be seen but I have a gut feeling you are probably right. So far things have been progressing faster than I thought it would.

    wayland or whatever it is

    Right. I played with that for a little while. I can see android people being interested in things like that.

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Don't cry for me I have vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.12(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's Brain - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001)
  • From Nicholas Boel@1:154/10 to Maurice Kinal on Tue Jul 25 20:47:24 2017
    Hello,

    On Wed, 26 Jul 2017 06:20:48 GMT, Maurice Kinal -> Nicholas Boel wrote:

    Speaking of which, both glibc-2.26 and gcc-7.2 are gearing up for
    releases in the next couple of weeks

    It seems you're already compiling everything, why not compile some more when they're out! ;)

    Heh, heh. That remains to be seen but I have a gut feeling you are probably right. So far things have been progressing faster than I
    thought it would.

    Keep me posted, especially if you go the aarch64 route. I'm interested in where
    you cut the cord and go back to compiling from source.

    wayland or whatever it is

    Right. I played with that for a little while. I can see android people being interested in things like that.

    Meh, overrated.

    Regards,
    Nick

    .... "Не знаю. Я здесь только работаю."

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/52
    * Origin: thePharcyde_ distribution system (1:154/10)
  • From Nicholas Boel@1:154/10 to Maurice Kinal on Tue Jul 25 20:49:28 2017
    Hello,

    On Wed, 26 Jul 2017 06:20:48 GMT, Maurice Kinal -> Nicholas Boel wrote:

    both glibc-2.26 and gcc-7.2 are
    By the way, I have to ask.. how long did glibc take to compile on the raspi3? Last time I compiled glibc on a single core CPU it took upwards of 8-10 hours.

    Not. Worth. It.

    ;)

    Regards,
    Nick

    .... "Не знаю. Я здесь только работаю."

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/52
    * Origin: thePharcyde_ distribution system (1:154/10)
  • From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001 to Nicholas Boel on Wed Jul 26 01:55:22 2017
    Hey Nicholas!

    why not compile some more when they're out

    That is the plan.

    especially if you go the aarch64 route

    For sure. At the moment that is what is running on there thanks to archlinux.
    Also managed to install their aarch64-unknown-linux-gnu gcc/glibc packages (and
    friends) so when the new gcc/glibc sources are released I'll use this current install to benchmark.

    I'm interested in where you cut the cord and go back to compiling
    from source.

    I am betting it won't be long after the gcc/glibc releases.

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Don't cry for me I have vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.12(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's Brain - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001)
  • From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001 to Nicholas Boel on Wed Jul 26 02:02:28 2017
    Hey Nicholas!

    how long did glibc take to compile on the raspi3?

    I am not sure but I managed to do an entire stage1 from the slackwarearm install in a day. I'll let you know exactly how long when I compile the new release on the archlinux install.

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Don't cry for me I have vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.12(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's Brain - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001)
  • From Nicholas Boel@1:154/10 to Maurice Kinal on Tue Jul 25 21:21:22 2017
    Hello,

    On Wed, 26 Jul 2017 06:55:22 GMT, Maurice Kinal -> Nicholas Boel wrote:

    For sure. At the moment that is what is running on there thanks to archlinux. Also managed to install their aarch64-unknown-linux-gnu gcc/glibc packages (and friends) so when the new gcc/glibc sources are released I'll use this current install to benchmark.

    So I take it the networking was a breeze then?

    I am betting it won't be long after the gcc/glibc releases.

    Speaking of which, I just took a look at the LFS site, and it seems their latest stuff is dated back to February! How often do they update their "releases" (or books) if you want to call them that? Some of those packages listed in 8.0 (their latest) are fairly old. ;(
    I dunno. I took interest for a second. It faded fast though.

    Regards,
    Nick

    .... "Не знаю. Я здесь только работаю."

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/52
    * Origin: thePharcyde_ distribution system (1:154/10)
  • From Nicholas Boel@1:154/10 to Maurice Kinal on Tue Jul 25 21:22:40 2017
    Hello,

    On Wed, 26 Jul 2017 07:02:28 GMT, Maurice Kinal -> Nicholas Boel wrote:

    how long did glibc take to compile on the raspi3?

    I am not sure but I managed to do an entire stage1 from the slackwarearm install in a day. I'll let you know exactly how long when I compile the new release on the archlinux install.

    I can't hold my breath that long. ;)

    Regards,
    Nick

    .... "Не знаю. Я здесь только работаю."

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/52
    * Origin: thePharcyde_ distribution system (1:154/10)
  • From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001 to Nicholas Boel on Wed Jul 26 02:57:04 2017
    Hey Nicholas!

    So I take it the networking was a breeze then?

    Once I figured out the systemd method. I am still using systemv and have no desire for change in that particular direction. Now that it contacted the mothership and installed gcc and friends I don't think it'll be needed in the future but then again it might. If so then I'll probably set up something on the LAN to take care of those sorts of issues. We'll see.

    it seems their latest stuff is dated back to February

    Take a looksee in http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/lfs/downloads/development/ and http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/lfs/downloads/systemd/ for the latest and greatest documentation. They don't do so-called stable releases that often. I
    heard a rumour that a stable release is in the works but I'd bet they are waiting until the glibc and gcc releases are official and successfully compiled
    first. The development docs can also be read online which is handy.

    I don't have the inside track but that is my best guesstimation.

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Don't cry for me I have vi.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.12(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Little Mikey's Brain - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001)
  • From Nicholas Boel@1:154/10 to Maurice Kinal on Wed Jul 26 17:03:12 2017
    Hello,

    On Wed, 26 Jul 2017 07:57:04 GMT, Maurice Kinal -> Nicholas Boel wrote:

    So I take it the networking was a breeze then?

    Once I figured out the systemd method.

    It's easy to learn, and once you force yourself to learn it it comes even easier as you go.

    When Archlinux decided to go systemd, I put my trust in their decision and went
    with it. I don't have any complaints. .service files are much smaller and easier to manage than sysvinit scripts, and things just seem a lot snappier as far as restarting things or stopping/starting, etc.

    I am still using systemv and have no desire for change in that
    particular direction.

    At this point it's only preference. Sysvinit is tried and true, and has worked for a long time. Systemd is new territory, so yeah, most people that are used to one way will continue to stick with it. It doesn't bother me either way and it's definitely not worth arguing about which is better. ;)

    Now that it contacted the mothership and installed gcc and friends I
    don't think it'll be needed in the future but then again it might.

    Who knows, you may be a convert and you don't even know it yet!

    If so then I'll probably set up something on the LAN to take care of
    those sorts of issues. We'll see.

    I go the "least amount of issues" route.

    http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/lfs/downloads/development/ and http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/lfs/downloads/systemd/ for the latest
    and greatest documentation.

    Thanks for the links. I never saw those when visiting the site directly, but then again I wasn't there long.

    I have had an interest in building my own system for quite awhile. Which is why
    I stuck with Gentoo for so long. But the way they changed things after Daniel Robbins left didn't keep me interested, and I wasn't going to start on the Funtoo train. Still, lots of dependencies pulled in and you end up with a bunch
    of crap you'll never use.

    I would have to figure out what I would actually want to build my own custom linux system for first, and go from there. Until I have that answer, I'll stick
    with Archlinux - since it seems to be the most reliable (for me), least amount of bloat until you start adding stuff you think you need, and their wiki is pretty dang good as well. Lots of great community support is also available.

    Regards,
    Nick

    .... "Не знаю. Я здесь только работаю."

    --- Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/52
    * Origin: thePharcyde_ distribution system (1:154/10)
  • From Maurice Kinal@1:153/7001.250 to Nicholas Boel on Wed Jul 26 22:12:33 2017
    Hey Nicholas!

    it's definitely not worth arguing about which is better

    Agreed. At the moment I have the best of both worlds albiet the slackwarearm requires a 64-bit cross compiler at the moment. I still have time to think about which way is best but I an leaning towards the one that will be independent of the internet. My neighbour wants to take it for a car ride and if the usb GPS dongle doesn't give any grief I am all for it. I found an addon
    card for both real time clock and DC/DC power supply that is locally manufactured (BC Robotics). That ought to fix the problem I currently have with the raspi3 (independence) as well as allowing to use a 12VDC battery for input when needed.

    Thanks for the links. I never saw those when visiting the site
    directly, but then again I wasn't there long.

    They don't make it easy to spot so I totally understand why you missed them.

    lots of dependencies pulled in and you end up with a bunch of crap
    you'll never use

    Exactly. That is what makes LFS so appealing.

    I'll stick with Archlinux - since it seems to be the most reliable
    (for me), least amount of bloat until you start adding stuff you
    think you need, and their wiki is pretty dang good as well.

    I've noticed that over the years. Their PKGBUILDs are well written and informative too, even if you don't use Archlinux. If I was to pick a distribution to get married to today it would likely be Archlinux.

    Life is good,
    Maurice

    ... Future cybertoasts of note:
    2018-01-01 is 159 days from now and falls on a Monday.
    2024-11-05 is 2659 days from now and falls on a Tuesday.
    --- GNU bash, version 4.4.12(1)-release (x86_64-silvermont-linux-gnu)
    * Origin: Pointy Stick Society - Ladysmith BC, Canada (1:153/7001.250)