• Favorite *nix IDE

    From Nightfox@DIGDIST/BATTLEST/FREEWAY to All on Fri Jan 22 15:14:00 2010
    So, for a poll, if you've done any significant software development in a *nix-style platform, have you used an IDE? And if so, what is your favorite IDE and why?

    I once had a software development job at a company that used Linux, and I ended up just using vi to write code and made use of gcc, g++, and gdb from the command prompt. I tried using KDevelop, but it didn't really seem to offer much of a better development experience. I know there are other IDEs available for Linux too (Eclipse, MonoDevelop, etc.) and am curious what other people have used. In Windows, I typically use Microsoft Visual Studio, and I think it provides great features for software development (good debugging functionality, IntelliSense, etc.). Apple's XCode seems fairly good too. I haven't yet used anything in Linux that I think compares to either of those, although I've heard that Eclipse is fairly good.

    One thing that frustrated me a little about Linux IDEs (and Linux tools in general) is the philosophy of making use of other software that already exists. That means that the things that suck about other software will still be there in other software that uses it. For instance, for debugging apps in Linux, I started to use DDD, but DDD is simply just a GUI wrapper for gdb, so what bugged me about gdb also bugged me in DDD; I felt that DDD was only marginally better.

    Nightfox

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  • From art@DIGDIST/BATTLEST/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Sat Jan 23 20:33:00 2010
    Re: Favorite *nix IDE
    By: Nightfox to All on Fri Jan 22 2010 15:14:15

    So, for a poll, if you've done any significant software development in a *nix-style platform, have you used an IDE? And if so, what is your favorite IDE and why?

    Hi Nightfox,

    Netbeans is one of my favorites for both Windows and *nix. Visual Studio is top of my list as you've said--it's a great IDE, however Netbeans comes pretty close. With its ability to handle ruby and rubygems for me it's pretty much the only IDE I work with in Linux.

    I have been known to do various work projects in vim (and cream-vim for windows, which I highly recommend), for a console editor, it's probably the top of its class. I've used motor as well in the past.

    I suppose that it all boils down to which language you use and for what purpose.

    Kind regards,
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  • From Nightfox@DIGDIST/BATTLEST/FREEWAY to art on Sat Jan 23 22:00:00 2010
    Re: Favorite *nix IDE
    By: art to Nightfox on Sat Jan 23 2010 20:33:38

    Netbeans is one of my favorites for both Windows and *nix. Visual Studio is of my list as you've said--it's a great IDE, however Netbeans comes pretty close. With its ability to handle ruby and rubygems for me it's pretty much only IDE I work with in Linux.

    I'll have to keep Netbeans in mind. :)

    I have been known to do various work projects in vim (and cream-vim for windows, which I highly recommend), for a console editor, it's probably the of its class. I've used motor as well in the past.

    I had a job interview earlier this year, and the company was all into Microsoft technologies.. When they saw I had Linux on my resume, the manager asked me what my favorite Linux editor is (maybe a loaded question), and when I said vi, they all groaned. hehe

    Nightfox

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  • From art@DIGDIST/BATTLEST/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Tue Jan 26 20:18:00 2010
    Re: Favorite *nix IDE
    By: Nightfox to art on Sat Jan 23 2010 22:00:05

    Hi Nightfox,

    I'll have to keep Netbeans in mind. :)

    Yes, excellent java support as well, which makes coding SBBS JSOM stuff a little bit easier on the eyes than what I was using (notepad.exe!).

    I had a job interview earlier this year, and the company was all into Microsoft
    technologies.. When they saw I had Linux on my resume, the manager asked me what my favorite Linux editor is (maybe a loaded question), and when I said vi,
    they all groaned. hehe

    I work for a Microsoft partner company, so I hear that. Mostly I can do and run whatever I want at work, which is great. But "whatever" does not include installing linux on my work kit! :) :(

    It's funny how the whole linux-vs-windows thing goes on, firstly at work, and secondly when I come home and I'm browsing the internet! At the end of the day I would like to think I'm well-versed in both OSes, it doesn't have to be one or the other with no room for middle ground. Unfortunately, that's the way most enterprise deployments work--they want an all-Microsoft environment for management.

    Personally at home, I've got everything from a Sparc Ultra 10 to Server 2008 R2 machines--and I've found each machine and OS to be good at doing at least one thing the others weren't... it's all about a mixed bag! At least in my humble opinion!

    Kind regs,
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  • From Nightfox@DIGDIST/BATTLEST/FREEWAY to art on Tue Jan 26 15:40:00 2010
    Re: Favorite *nix IDE
    By: art to Nightfox on Tue Jan 26 2010 20:18:34

    I'll have to keep Netbeans in mind. :)

    Yes, excellent java support as well, which makes coding SBBS JSOM stuff a little bit easier on the eyes than what I was using (notepad.exe!).

    I've been using Notepad2 to write my SBBS JSOM stuff. Notepad2 was written as a replacement for Windows Notepad, with many extra features, including syntax coloring for various programming languages, including JavaScript. I've gotten to like it as a quick & simple text editor for writing things like JavaScript scripts.

    I work for a Microsoft partner company, so I hear that. Mostly I can do and whatever I want at work, which is great. But "whatever" does not include installing linux on my work kit! :) :(

    I'm sorry to hear that. ;) I don't mind working in a company that uses Microsoft stuff (I do think they have good products), but what I don't particularly like is the "war" that Microsoft has against pretty much everyone else.

    It's funny how the whole linux-vs-windows thing goes on, firstly at work, an secondly when I come home and I'm browsing the internet! At the end of the d I would like to think I'm well-versed in both OSes, it doesn't have to be on or the other with no room for middle ground. Unfortunately, that's the way m enterprise deployments work--they want an all-Microsoft environment for management.

    I agree - And it seems that many companies aren't even open to considering alternative solutions and products. I've talked to some who go as far as not even trusting Linux - I had a job interview once at a place that used all Microsoft stuff, and the interviewer asked me what I thought of Linux. I said I genrally liked it, and he said he didn't trust Linux because since it's open-source, he thought that anyone could go into the Linux source code and put in a virus or otherwise malicious code. It's attitudes like that that I don't quite understand.. As a computer geek, I'm fairly computer-agnostic, and I like taking a look at anything and everything, from Windows to Linux to Apple/Macintosh, and pretty much anything else.

    Personally at home, I've got everything from a Sparc Ultra 10 to Server 2008 machines--and I've found each machine and OS to be good at doing at least on thing the others weren't... it's all about a mixed bag! At least in my humbl opinion!

    I agree with you there. :) I wouldn't mind tinkering with a Sparc machine; I've also heard that Amiga is planning to release a new computer this year, and it looks interesting.

    Nightfox

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  • From art@DIGDIST/BATTLEST/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Wed Jan 27 20:07:00 2010
    Re: Favorite *nix IDE
    By: Nightfox to art on Tue Jan 26 2010 15:40:36

    Hi Nightfox,

    I've been using Notepad2 to write my SBBS JSOM stuff. Notepad2 was written

    I've heard of N2 but not tried it out yet, I'll have to remember that one. Cream/win32 itself is fairly hefty as it is VIM + more, it actually takes longer than visual studio 2010 to load up on my machines(!)

    I'm sorry to hear that. ;) I don't mind working in a company that uses Microsoft stuff (I do think they have good products), but what I don't particularly like is the "war" that Microsoft has against pretty much everyone

    I agree with you there--Server 2008, Windows 7, and SQL 2008 for example are rock solid products. As a partner we do get access to beta products, and even the stuff like the Windows 7 Technical Preview was amazing (bear in mind that this was 6-12 months before even the Open Beta). Good quality software is being churned out (or bought out) by them, which in my opinion is a good thing. I couldn't imagine life without Microsoft SQL Server or Windows Server 2003 or 2008...

    I agree - And it seems that many companies aren't even open to considering alternative solutions and products. I've talked to some who go as far as

    I think to a degree it's a lot of "they use Microsoft, so we should too". There's also the legal departments who need a finger to point the blame when IT goes wrong; while you can get enterprise MySQL support, try to do the same for a smaller open source project and you're basically up shit creek -paddle.

    Microsoft is pretty much the only player with a long history and is on the edge of innovation (I'm probably opening up a huge can of worms by saying that...). Old classics like Cisco and Oracle are being replaced by a single vendor that does it all.

    open-source, he thought that anyone could go into the Linux source code and in a virus or otherwise malicious code. It's attitudes like that that I quite understand.. As a computer geek, I'm fairly computer-agnostic, and I

    Yep. We've all heard that before. Although to a degree, I agree with that philosophy. Why require someone to read source code before they can trust it? In fact, why would anyone apart from a programmer want to read source code at all? Non-geeks prefer binaries, in my experience.

    Versus buying a product from Microsoft, all those unknowns add up to a lot of time and risk very few companies I've come across are willing to accept that risk.

    I've also heard that Amiga is planning to release a new computer this year,

    Yeah I have seen that as well, looking forward to its release, although not sure if I'm going to purchase one!

    Kind regards,
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