• i5-2430

    From MATTHEW MUNSON@VERT/IUTOPIA to All on Fri Mar 27 11:26:00 2020
    It seems I should give old technology a chance before it gets refurbished to a stranger to
    have. Should a laptop from 2011 be able to use a ssd drive that is 2.5 inch? It has 8gb of
    ram and it should be a good basic laptop for general use.
    ---
    wcQWK 8.0
  • From Gamgee@VERT/PALANT to MATTHEW MUNSON on Sat Mar 28 10:48:00 2020
    MATTHEW MUNSON wrote to All <=-

    It seems I should give old technology a chance before it gets
    refurbished to a stranger to have. Should a laptop from 2011 be
    able to use a ssd drive that is 2.5 inch? It has 8gb of ram and
    it should be a good basic laptop for general use. ---

    Yes, assuming it currently has a 2.5" SATA mechanical HD, the SSD
    drive will work fine. That would be an excellent laptop for
    general use.



    ... If it walks out of your refrigerator, let it go.
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    Synchronet Palantir BBS * palantirbbs.ddns.net * Pensacola, FL
  • From Tracker1@VERT/TRN to Gamgee on Sat Mar 28 12:06:19 2020
    On 3/28/2020 8:48 AM, Gamgee wrote:
    It seems I should give old technology a chance before it gets
    refurbished to a stranger to have. Should a laptop from 2011 be
    able to use a ssd drive that is 2.5 inch? It has 8gb of ram and
    it should be a good basic laptop for general use. ---

    Yes, assuming it currently has a 2.5" SATA mechanical HD, the SSD
    drive will work fine. That would be an excellent laptop for
    general use.

    Agreed... an SSD would make a night and day difference and 2011 means
    it's more likely to be accessible than more modern laptops for upgrades.
    Would also see if you can go to 16gb of ram if that's a reasonable
    upgrade, though 8gb should be fine for general use.

    Might also consider a lighter chromium or linux distro depending on your needs.

    --
    Michael J. Ryan
    tracker1 +o Roughneck BBS

    ---
    Synchronet Roughneck BBS - coming back 2/2/20
  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to MATTHEW MUNSON on Sat Mar 28 11:32:00 2020
    MATTHEW MUNSON wrote to All <=-

    It seems I should give old technology a chance before it gets
    refurbished to a stranger to have. Should a laptop from 2011 be able to use a ssd drive that is 2.5 inch? It has 8gb of ram and it should be a good basic laptop for general use.

    Most probably, depends on the laptop. What brand/model is it?

    Whether a 2011 laptop would make the most of a modern SSD drive depends on
    the laptop's SATA interface; some old Thinkpads used a SATA to PATA bridge, which limited the speed of the SATA interface throughput, but I think manufacturers were pretty much done by then and supporting SATA natively.

    Another option if cost is an issue is a hybrid SATA drive. I bought a lot of them for laptops back then, and they made a big difference. It's a SATA
    drive with a big (2-4GB) solid state cache. The drives boot up the same, but as they start caching data, the laptop pulls from the cache instead of the spinning drive and subsequent accesses are as flash speeds.




    ... The inconsistency principle
    --- MultiMail/XT v0.52
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  • From Weatherman@VERT/TLCBBS to MATTHEW MUNSON on Sat Mar 28 20:59:00 2020
    MATTHEW MUNSON wrote to All <=-

    @MSGID: <5E7EEECE.16588.dove-hlp@vert.synchro.net>
    It seems I should give old technology a chance before it gets
    refurbished to a stranger to have. Should a laptop from 2011 be able to use a ssd drive that is 2.5 inch? It has 8gb of ram and it should be a good basic laptop for general use. ---
    wcQWK 8.0

    If it was originally designed to use a 2.5" SATA hard drive then you should be able to drop a SATA SSD in with no trouble. As far as the BIOS is concerned, it's a mass storage device. It doesn't care if it's a platter drive or solid state. The actual drive interface has been housed on the drive itself since the beginning of the IDE days.

    -==*>Weatherman<*==-

    ... He does the work of 3 Men...Moe, Larry & Curly
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.49
    Synchronet The Lost Chord BBS - Cheyenne, WY
  • From Tracker1@VERT/TRN to poindexter FORTRAN on Sun Mar 29 01:34:09 2020
    On 3/28/2020 4:32 AM, poindexter FORTRAN wrote:
    Most probably, depends on the laptop. What brand/model is it?

    Whether a 2011 laptop would make the most of a modern SSD drive depends on the laptop's SATA interface; some old Thinkpads used a SATA to PATA bridge, which limited the speed of the SATA interface throughput, but I think manufacturers were pretty much done by then and supporting SATA natively.

    Even if it's a slower SATA2 interface, an SSD will just maximize that interface, likely a multiple faster than a spinning disk, especially one
    from that time period.

    Another option if cost is an issue is a hybrid SATA drive. I bought a lot of them for laptops back then, and they made a big difference. It's a SATA
    drive with a big (2-4GB) solid state cache. The drives boot up the same, but as they start caching data, the laptop pulls from the cache instead of the spinning drive and subsequent accesses are as flash speeds.

    Be experience was a bit different, I'd often fill/flush the SSD caching
    layer and it slowed like a rock.. performance was unreliable to say the least... these days an actual SSD isn't much more than a spinning laptop disk... you can get 1TB for around $100 or so.

    Okay, you can get laptop non-ssd's for half that... it's more than worth
    it still imho.

    --
    Michael J. Ryan
    tracker1 +o Roughneck BBS

    ---
    Synchronet Roughneck BBS - coming back 2/2/20
  • From MATTHEW MUNSON@VERT/IUTOPIA to POINDEXTER FORTRAN on Sun Mar 29 08:39:00 2020
    Most probably, depends on the laptop. What brand/model is it?

    Samsung RC512 laptop, it was a custom model for the Microsoft Store.

    ---
    wcQWK 8.0